$700.00 on two Cutco knives???

Hickory n steel

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You guys do know they own KA-BAR right ?

My mom's aunt used to sell Cutco which my great grandmother bought and while my grandmother was her live in caretaker she said my great grandmother had been ripped off.

My aunt on the other hand has had her set for probably 20 years and has been perfectly happy with them.

Based on what I've heard I would probably much rather go with Rada cutlery, they're dirt cheap and they take a great edge in no time.
I would not be surprised if the steel is equal, and they're at least 1 /10th the cost.
 
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Indeed Kabar and Cutco are the same company and I always thought it was intentional that Kabar didn't advertise that fact. Cutco knives are at best decent only if compared to the average junk at a department store. They do carry a mystifying high secondary market value. I dislike them a great deal and I feel terrible for those poor souls that have paid full price for them, it is a scam and unlike Kirby vacuums are made of crap. While a Kirby vacuum is a horrid investment they are pretty decent vacuum cleaners especially for under $50, Cutco knives are barely worth 10% of what they cost originally.
 

jlauffer

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I've known people from the Cut Co company. The whole plan was/is to send college kids out selling them door to door. Even Cut Co will tell you this all falls apart after the kids sell their parents, grand parents and maybe a few close family and friends. For most sales drop to about zero in the days that follow but Cut Co has found there are always a few hard charging "salesmen" out there that will do well with the product. The knives aren't bad just over priced. Ethan Becker told me he thought their bread knife was the best one on the market.
My teenage son got 2 letters from Vector Marketing a month or so ago about summer jobs, but no mention of what the job actually was. Quick google search uncovered the link to CutCo and how it's basically a scam, as you have to buy a set of knives to use as your sales sample. Uhhh, no thanks.
 

tomsch

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Cutco knives are complete crap but I will say that I caved and bought a set of their kitchen shears and they are great! Still over priced but definitely something to check out.
 

3fifty7

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My mother in law got a complete set of Cutco pots, pans, and knives. $,$$$

I told my wife she didn’t buy the pots, pans, and knives she bought the salesman's story.
 
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Kulrich

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The Cutco kitchen knives are the most over rated and over priced kitchen knife on the market. They do have a loyal following, probably because people do not want to admit they got ripped off. I have sharpened some for people over the years, they take an ok edge. Now the older Cutco non-kitchen knives (including Alcas, they also made the Bowen knives and knives for Aurum etching) are good knives. This is also not to forget they own Ka-Bar as well. But the kitchen line is a marketing company, and that is something they have done well with. They have been able to sell a mediocre product for a premium price and convince buyers they made a great investment.
 
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Many years ago, just for fun, I had a Cutco rep come and demo their knives. She was very surprised when my knives cut better than some of the Cutco knives.
 

USMCPOP

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I have one or two small Cutco serrated knives I bought at Goodwill. One had a leather sheath. They were worth the ~ $2. I paid for each of them. Cheap steel, very nicely buffed, not worth much.
 
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I have a habit of rescuing kitchen knives from a thrift store I volunteer at(they don'tsell knives, so they're free to employees). Brought home a Cutco butcher knife with a weird contoured wood handle (it looks like a turd to me). I hated sharpening it. Seemed like the steel was very chippy. I'll take my recued Chicago Cutlery butcher knife any day.
 
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I think Cutco are 440A. I'll give a tip of the hat for high rust resistance. Not any harder to sharpen than any 440 variant. People bring them all the time and they are nothing special. Nothing I have seen to date is as chippy as Shuns
 

myu

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Cutco's best kitchen implements -- shears. They are the strongest, most resilient shears I've ever had. And their lifetime service is an amazing thing, there if you happen to make a mistake and abuse your scissors. Their knives are good too, depending upon which model you get. They have some real crap, but they have some gems too. I have one of their saber carving knives that is super sharp and holds its edge well.
 
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I think Cutco are 440A. I'll give a tip of the hat for high rust resistance. Not any harder to sharpen than any 440 variant. People bring them all the time and they are nothing special. Nothing I have seen to date is as chippy as Shuns
I’ve noticed my Shun chef knife is as easy to chip as a dang ceramic knife. I have three Shun knives, and while not bad, I will likely not buy another unless I found it at a giveaway price. And you would have to pay me to take a Cutco.
 

FoxMacLeod2501

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I've known people from the Cut Co company. The whole plan was/is to send college kids out selling them door to door. Even Cut Co will tell you this all falls apart after the kids sell their parents, grand parents and maybe a few close family and friends. For most sales drop to about zero in the days that follow but Cut Co has found there are always a few hard charging "salesmen" out there that will do well with the product. The knives aren't bad just over priced. Ethan Becker told me he thought their bread knife was the best one on the market.
Yeah the big bread knife is solid. Plus, as anyone who works with hand tools for a living might be aware, only part of the price is what happens prior to your purchase: R&D/engineering, overhead, production/manufacturing, sales... But that's mostly the extent of what anyone considers when thinking about the cost and value of a purchase... if they even know the difference between the two concepts.

I own a lot of tools and equipment from the major tool trucks you see around, Mac, Matco, Snap-On. A big part of what I happily pay for, when buying from them, is the value of what the company does and after the point of purchase. I can find a wrench that'll do 98% of what the Snap-On one does, and it'll cost a lot less. But *I* have to go do that. As a mechanic, I don't have to even go anywhere to find it. Truck shows up, and there it is. It's made here in the USA, and if it ever breaks, they'll give me a new one. I don't have to fill out a form, or go to the post office; I give it to the rep, I get a new wrench. My time is not free any other time of the day, and I'm happy to pay extra for not having to use my time for that.

Now, for less crucial stuff, I'm fine with something inexpensive, if it's not so cheap as to be unsafe or difficult to use. I try to choose wisely in my battles with my wallet.

Anyway, on to CutCo. My lady's mother bought one, maybe about 30 years back, from what she says, as well as those kitchen shears you can cut a penny in half with. I believe that a close friend was trying to raise money for something, and that she would probably have never bought them, otherwise. Honestly, I'm a bit of a blade snob at this point, but... They're not bad. The shears are really good, actually. The bread knife gets used a few times every week or two. It's not hard for a serrated knife to cut for a long time... But the ones on this bread knife have been sharp for two years now. I realize this isn't exactly impressive, but it is a totally competent blade for bread.

To this day, over a quarter-century later, on top of the years of use, she can redeem even more value from the price she paid on purchase. If either of them dull or break, she'll send them to CutCo and get 'em back in sharp, working, order. If they can't fix or sharpen, they'll send a replacement. She just had both the knife and the shears sharpened a couple summers back. A solid argument could be made that these items were well worth the price. By the way, she doesn't remember how much they were, but she remembered they "were not cheap!"

Personally, I would generally be happier with high-carbon Japanese kitchen cutlery. It has character. I know how to take care of it, and I *enjoy* taking care of it.

I despise pyramid schemes. They're an assault on the poor and the optimistic, taking fully the advantage of human vulnerability to the fallacies of sunk cost and confirmation bias. They dangle a carrot, get you up on that treadmill, and slowly crank it up as they bleed you dry.

Sometimes though, these scam operations actually sell good stuff. A few, from what I've heard, are even known for it. Apparently most people in HerbaLife join it just so they can buy product at the discount rate. Amsoil lubricants, for another example, operate a terrible hellscape of a pyramid-shaped business model, where almost every Amsoil vendor operates at a net loss... But it is a good product. I'd call it the opposite of believing something is good because it is expensive and has a name. It probably is, but these are things best judged on their own merits.

If it's important to the end-user to only buy something one time, they'll soon come to understand that adds to the price. Whether or not price and value line up in a favorable way is different depending on who's making that decision.
 
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