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Enuff is Enuff

Discussion in 'Spyderco' started by whetrock, Dec 11, 2012.

  1. Jake Bauer

    Jake Bauer

    Sep 19, 2007
    With the Enuff price tag at just over $100? No way. I was hoping to see the price on it be around $60-70. I saw an early price on the new street bowie around $90. If that's the case I'll be all over one.
     
  2. The Deacon

    The Deacon

    Apr 27, 2003
    I realize it depends on what the max allowable length in a given location is, and that it may be more than 2.5" but,FWIW, the catalog lists the blade lengths of all three versions of the Enuff as 2.75" and the edge lengths at 2.54", so I'm not sure where folks are getting 2.5" from.
     
  3. Sithus1966

    Sithus1966

    Jan 24, 2008
    Sheepfoot is like a miniature Jumpmaster. Blade lengths in the catalog are correct. Comparison shots with a few popular blades.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]
     
  4. whetrock

    whetrock

    Nov 13, 2010
    While I'm not within the demographic intended for the H1 Enuff, for some individuals (commercial fisherman, divers and Kayakers etc.) this could be a godsend. I'd be more apt to purchase the clip point myself, I for one have had excellent luck with Spyderco VG-10. It resist corrosion and has more than serviceable edge retention. The blade is a tad bit short though, and 3 or 3.5 inches or so would suite me a bit better, however that's not the aim of this particular knife. I feel like it's intended to be a sufficient, minimalist fixed blade that isn't too terribly skimpy, and sports a decent set of scales from the factory as well as a nice belt sheath.
     
  5. The Deacon

    The Deacon

    Apr 27, 2003
    Sal has said, on more than one occasion, that serrated H-1 outperformed any other steel they've CATRA tested in terms of edge retention. So, even if total immunity to rust is not a major plus, if someone is in the market for a serrated blade, and H-1 is available, there's still good reason to choose it. I understand that's not the case with you, just wanted you to be aware that the demographics for serrated H-1 are broader than you may think.
     
  6. whetrock

    whetrock

    Nov 13, 2010
    Yeah I've got a FS H1 Ladybug, that will hold an edge almost indefinitely, H1 paired with serrations, is a killer combo (I guess it has to do with the mechanical hardening process), I'm not for certain though if I really need a fully serrated fixed blade at this moment. I might in the future sometime, but then again I'm rethinking serrations in general, and might go for one or something similar.
     
  7. rshives

    rshives

    33
    Feb 29, 2008
    I just got back from SFO where I picked up the sheepsfoot Enuff. Very cool little knife. I have an ATR and an Endura in spyderedge and this length blade will be perfect. I'll mainly use it while on my motorcycle in case I have to cut fabric quickly, however it just feathered an old folded up paper statement I had laying around. I think I'll really like it.
     
  8. Butch

    Butch Gold Member Gold Member

    232
    Nov 25, 2003
    The sheepsfoot is my favorite blade shape for a utility/work knife. I would like to see it available with a plain edge.
     
  9. ISKski

    ISKski

    990
    Apr 11, 2011
    Exactly
     
  10. Sal Glesser

    Sal Glesser Moderator Moderator

    Dec 27, 1998
    I appreicate the thoughts. The knife was designed to be a small heavy duty outdoor model. I believe that the 4mm thickness better serves the design function of the model than a thinner blade.

    sal
     
  11. Gary W. Graley

    Gary W. Graley “Imagination is more important than knowledge" Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Mar 2, 1999
    On the leaf shaped one, what's the thickness at the shoulder of the edge bevel? just curious as to how thin they were flat ground down to, having a thicker spine isn't a killer only if they were ground down enough, I guess you could always get them reground by someone like Tom K or similar guys that are offering that service...
    G2
     
  12. Sal Glesser

    Sal Glesser Moderator Moderator

    Dec 27, 1998
    Hi G2,

    About .025 at the shoulder.

    sal
     
  13. Gary W. Graley

    Gary W. Graley “Imagination is more important than knowledge" Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Mar 2, 1999
    Thanks Sal, I'll pick one up !!
    G2
     
  14. upnorth

    upnorth

    Nov 25, 2006
    Regardless, still too short. Tempting though.
     
  15. Wharn

    Wharn Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2011
    Mine just came in the mail today. I really am loving this one right out of the box and am going to take it on a day hike tomorrow. It fits in my hand perfectly and is nice and light. I was surprised how thick the blade is. It does, however, have a slight rattle in the sheath but I am not worried about it falling out or anything. I really hope the sheepsfoot model is made in H1.
     
  16. yablanowitz

    yablanowitz

    Apr 14, 2006
    I must be getting really old, because that makes absolutely no sense to me.
     
  17. Sal Glesser

    Sal Glesser Moderator Moderator

    Dec 27, 1998
    Hi Jack,

    My concern was to avoid bending or breaking the blade. The handle is quite stout and in my opinion, twisting and prying will surely happen when using the knife. Those activities more easily damage a thinner stock, especially when flat ground.

    sal
     
  18. yablanowitz

    yablanowitz

    Apr 14, 2006
    Like I said, I must be getting really old. One, if my father had seen me twisting or prying with a knife, he'd have slapped me on the back of the head and said "Idiot, that's not a crowbar!" And two, the thicker the blade is, the more likely it is to bind in the cut, so the more likely you are to end up twisting or prying to get it out. Self-fulfilling prophecy.
     
  19. Gary W. Graley

    Gary W. Graley “Imagination is more important than knowledge" Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Mar 2, 1999
    hehe, I'm getting older every day as well, but my take on this blade is it makes it a bit tougher than say a paring knife, while a paring knife is an exceptional cutter it's not one I'd take and use in a lot of every day cutting chores, being a bit too thin, so this takes some of the worry about harming a smaller blade in tougher situations, you might not literally be prying like with a crowbar but you may do something that might do harm to a thinner blade, but, I'll see how mine is when it arrives next week and report back...
    G2
     
  20. Sal Glesser

    Sal Glesser Moderator Moderator

    Dec 27, 1998
    Not all of our customers are as "old" as you are :p ....nor as knife knowledgable. I expect quite a few of these to make it into the outdoor, watersport, survival, rescue, military and diving markets. Some even for SD. Those customers tend to be tough on a knife. Cuting sheetrock is hard on the edge, but your experience keeps the blades intact.

    sal
     

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