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Farm Life

Discussion in 'Buck Knives' started by David Martin, Apr 24, 2016.

  1. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    The second one. Even wet and with chicken material on my hands the handle on this 110 stays very secure. DM
    cutChicken110.jpg
     
  2. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    I got a bonus on both of them, an egg. The egg from the first hen had a nice hard shell. The egg from the 2nd hen, not so. It had a
    soft leather shell which I doubt would have hardened. Look closely at the 2 livers. They are not the right color or form. Their filter
    is used up, making them more susceptible to sickness.
    This 110 worked well. Having stropped it to remove prior burrs it's edge is now more refined than 'as original'. Thus, it struggled some to cut the anal vent. (think cutting small wet intestines) Other than this I didn't note much change in it's performance. So, consider this in your sharpening strategy. Something about the clip point blade I like is it's ability to navigate in narrow places. Such as cleaning the lungs out between the ribs. I will reverse the edge (edge up now) and use the point to dig between the ribs
    to peel out this organ. This really works well. Whereas a drop point will struggle to remove this as it's point is wider. They both have their place. I noticed it's edge now has some burrs I need to remove to restore it to a good cutting blade. Thanks, DM
    edited: for a good liver look at post 853.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2019
    jbmonkey likes this.
  3. st8yd

    st8yd Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 6, 2009
    I figured that had to be the liver but it sure dont look right.
    As im sure you have, ive cleaned them when they were full of eggs tapering down in size to near nothing, neat how quickly they develop.
     
    jbmonkey likes this.
  4. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Yes, I agree.
    I've thought about what manner I'll go about bringing this 110's edge back to good condition and I'll do it the way st8yd suggests.
    I'll give it a few light stokes on a steel, edge leading and look at the edge. This steel has some very fine lateral lines on it. I guess it was hard for the camera to read these. DM
    steeling110.jpg
     
    sassafrassdogs3, pjsjr and jbmonkey like this.
  5. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Ok, I've had a chance to do some stroking on the steel. With some stroking 6-8 passes per side the edge cannot cut up a tomato or slice open a stalk of Ritz crackers. After 12-16 more passes it will open a stalk of Ritz crackers. I gave it 10-12 more passes and it is not much improved, it will cut paper and open Ritz crackers. I cannot feel burrs but the edge looks mangled, miss aligned using a 8X headset. It might could struggle through one more chicken to finish my shift but it really
    needs some stone work. I'm going to use a back honing method on my fine India stone with mineral oil. I'm trying to utilize methods with minimal metal removed, keeping knife longevity in mind. DM
    edited: So, my estimates from post 882 were pretty accurate.
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2019
    redcanoe and jbmonkey like this.
  6. cudgee

    cudgee Gold Member Gold Member

    799
    May 13, 2019
    Really interesting thread.
     
  7. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Ok, I got Buck's red micarta 110 back honed. The format I use is; apply oil to the stone maybe 10 drops and smooth this in. Then back hone one side using light pressure until a tiny burr is felt on the opposite side. Flip it over and back hone the other side in the same manner. Now
    the burr is felt on the other side. Now I use a edge leading light stoke and get most of this burr off. Flip it over and doing the other
    side in the same manner. Just going after burr removal. Once you've done both sides some burr will remain, do that area using edge leading very light push strokes until all felt burrs are gone. It should slice copy paper even newspaper now. This took me about 7-8 mins..
    I think steeling does not remove much if any metal. Stropping on plain leather as well. Stropping on leather with slurry applied does remove minimal metal particles. Back honing will remove half of what a full sharpening removes. Good luck & thanks, DM
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2019
    Don W, lonestar1979, jbmonkey and 2 others like this.
  8. st8yd

    st8yd Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 6, 2009
    I have two steels, a cheap one with course grooves that came in a kitchen set we got 25+ yrs ago. The other i got working along side a butcher that he recomended it is smooth and he told me to use sand paper lengthwise. I like my cheap one best. However i have not ever looked at my results under magnification. If it cuts the peach fuzz on my arm it is typically good enough for me.
     
  9. cudgee

    cudgee Gold Member Gold Member

    799
    May 13, 2019
    Like your simplicity, if your knife is sharp enough to do what you need, that is all you need. A lot of people over complicate sharpening. "If it works for you, stick to it"
     
  10. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Some additional tips I've noticed on keeping this 110's blade tuned: you can sharpen it on a fine India and it responds well to this stone type.
    The end burr is more difficult to remove on this type stone and those burrs (feel for the curl) that will come up after a few days use. I tried to remove them on a X fine diamond and found that to be too fine. The fine diamond worked better and a fine SiC stone
    worked really well. The SiC stone I use is a 400 grit made by the Carborundum Co. from the 1960's but any fine SiC stone will likely do a good job. I use a little mineral oil on the stone and it usually takes 4 passes on each side of the blade. Push the edge, flip the blade over and give it another short pass (maybe a 2" push on those areas). Flip the blade and give it the same amount of pass on the stone using a light touch. After 4 flips of the blade, the burr will be gone. Here's a photo of the results. This is freezer
    paper it is cutting. All nice clean cuts, smooth, no hesitation, over comes wrinkles and no paper fibers left on the blade after cutting. A good utility edge. DM
    micarta110A.jpg
     
  11. tiguy7

    tiguy7 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 25, 2008
    AF9E9B9D-61FC-4B88-9C0B-86387A20DB19.jpeg The problem is the 420HC steel. When I use a freshly sharpened 420HC blade to filet grapefruit, it is good for 2 grapefruit. When I use a BuckCote blade for the same task, it will do an 18 lb. bag.
     
    sassafrassdogs3, Makael and jbmonkey like this.
  12. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Yep, different steel, sharpened different. I would think the 420 steel could do more grapefruit than that. I'll buy some and look into that. They sure look nice the way you peeled them. But yes a BuckCote blade will do a lot more. DM
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2019
  13. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    On your grapefruit you used the knife to help peel the outer skin? That was all you used the knife for? Making sure I know exactly
    how to duplicate you work. DM
     
  14. tiguy7

    tiguy7 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 25, 2008
    6E50305E-34DA-4CB2-8DD7-9984BCD8969C.jpeg 8B3CDE4F-862B-4D9B-AC27-BC345AE64506.jpeg 64897D46-3E36-49B6-BE5E-171AA460C346.jpeg Cone the top and bottom making sure that the end of each section is exposed. Then remove the remaining skin. This is the part that dulls the lesser steels. Cut down to the center along the edge of a section and spread the crack. Turn the knife over and slit the apex of a section opposite the crack. Pull the 2 halves apart.
    Find a section that has no membrane on one side. Starting at the section apex, put the edge of the blade under it and pop it out. This only works if you remove membrane or meat from center to outside of sphere. Slit another apex, remove the membrane on one side, and pop the meat out.
    This works on oranges, lemons, and limes. This operation impresses the ladies much more than whittling.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2019
  15. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Ok, thanks. I'll bet it impresses them. Good job. DM
     
  16. st8yd

    st8yd Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 6, 2009
    Got to use the 536 this afternoon on a little pig, may have found a new favorite. Also put my new 121 and 898 to use.
    Buck 536 p.jpeg Resized_20190721_164139.jpeg
     
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  17. onionfan

    onionfan

    263
    Nov 29, 2008
    How do the autos handle getting bloody etc? I like the look of that 898 and the 110 autos are calling my name but didn't know how clean up was for one. Especially the 110.
     
  18. Old Hunter

    Old Hunter Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 12, 2012
    David, I enjoy following this thread - translates well to pheasant and wild turkey. OH
     
  19. st8yd

    st8yd Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 6, 2009
    Don't know, it didn't get very dirty. Ya I like both the 898 and the 110 auto.
     
    onionfan likes this.
  20. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    st8yd, that's good to know.
    OH, thanks. Just try to avoid forcing it thru bones. DM
     
    Old Hunter likes this.

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