For display purposes only?

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Nov 21, 2020
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I bought two old, rusty, crusty dha-looking swords off the internet. It's entirely possible that they were never really meant to be used to cut stuff (there is no mechanical connection between the tang and handle; I removed one handle that felt loose and added heavy duty epoxy, and I think the blades are mild steel) but that didn't stop me from sharpening them and cutting stuff with them anyway. They turned out to be a lot of fun, even if they were only meant for display.
 

Triton

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As I recall the way you fixed it is how Dha are put together. I.e no mechanical connection, just some serious glue. Having said that these look like pretty sketchy Dha from Anyirak or similar, ( I owned one myself once) so I echo the comments to be careful.
 
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Nice cutting .

Might want to get a full suit of armor for your girl assistant . ;)

I do like the Thai style , but only have the Cold Steel Thai Machete .

Not really great for a sword but plenty strong built machete with a great, extra-long , two hand handle . :cool::thumbsup:

 
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Nice cutting .

Might want to get a full suit of armor for your girl assistant . ;)

I do like the Thai style , but only have the Cold Steel Thai Machete .

Not really great for a sword but plenty strong built machete with a great, extra-long , two hand handle . :cool::thumbsup:

I really like two handed action myself. I'm a fan of the Condor Makara; Yoshimi looked awesome but was a disappointment IRL. The CS Thai looks like a lot of bang for the buck
 
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As I recall the way you fixed it is how Dha are put together. I.e no mechanical connection, just some serious glue. Having said that these look like pretty sketchy Dha from Anyirak or similar, ( I owned one myself once) so I echo the comments to be careful.
These things were definitely in need of some refurbishment before I started in with them. I'm glad I thought to shore up the connection (and by "shore up", I mean jerking the shaky feeling handle completely off, buffing the residue off the tang, cleaning out the hole and re-seating with the industrial strength loc tite) because now I'm having horrible images of an unsecured blade flying off and impaling my daughter....ahhhhh! I'm a terrible dad.
 

David Mary

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These things were definitely in need of some refurbishment before I started in with them. I'm glad I thought to shore up the connection (and by "shore up", I mean jerking the shaky feeling handle completely off, buffing the residue off the tang, cleaning out the hole and re-seating with the industrial strength loc tite) because now I'm having horrible images of an unsecured blade flying off and impaling my daughter....ahhhhh! I'm a terrible dad.

You took all the right steps. The only thing I would say you could have done differently, perhaps, is a little more slicing motion while trying to cut the standing paper. ;)

By the way, do I see a Spyderco Bow River in a custom sheath on your hip? If so, how do you like the knife?
 
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Just wanted to mention not all historical swords that were used in wars had peened tangs or riveted handle constructions. Many swords from the middle east and India had only pitch tar (basically a glue) holding the tang inside the handle. Many Talwars and similar swords that saw actual war were only held together by pitch. This goes for daggers as well like the Jambiya and Khanjar, sometimes only a tiny portion of the tang went into the hilt.
They were all fully functional.
 

Triton

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Just wanted to mention not all historical swords that were used in wars had peened tangs or riveted handle constructions. Many swords from the middle east and India had only pitch tar (basically a glue) holding the tang inside the handle. Many Talwars and similar swords that saw actual war were only held together by pitch. This goes for daggers as well like the Jambiya and Khanjar, sometimes only a tiny portion of the tang went into the hilt.
They were all fully functional.
Burmese and Thai Dha have similar construction.
 
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Burmese and Thai Dha have similar construction.
There's quite a few swords and daggers with this type of construction through the middle east and parts of Asia. It was the norm in india through most of their history, until the 19th century when they began to introduce peened tangs.
 

Triton

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There's quite a few swords and daggers with this type of construction through the middle east and parts of Asia. It was the norm in india through most of their history, until the 19th century when they began to introduce peened tangs.
Interesting, I did not know that.
 
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Interesting, I did not know that.
Some people who are experienced collectors of Indian antique arms believe that the introduction of peened tangs in Indian swords was due to British influence in the 1800's. Because all old Talwars pre dating the late 1800's have pitch glue hilt constructions. It's only after the late 1800's and early 1900's we begin to see peened tang construction making it's way into Talwar hilts.
 
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