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Great Eastern 38s Farmers Jack

Discussion in 'Traditional Folders and Fixed Blades' started by glocktenman, Jul 30, 2016.

  1. blademan 13

    blademan 13 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 25, 2000
    I agree with the favorable comments above concerning the absolute utility this knife offers. I carry one everyday in a horizontal slip sheath for ease of access. Just a great knife that you have to try for awhile and make up your own mind. Beauty is definitely in the eye of the beholder
    [​IMG]
     
  2. Kitten Party

    Kitten Party

    Jun 9, 2014
    The more I look at these the more I realize I need to have one. .. let the hunt begin.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I527 using Tapatalk
     
  3. Will Power

    Will Power

    Jan 18, 2007
    Here's my latest which I was very lucky to be able to get from Jamie on the Exchange, thanks mate! I always though Camel Bone was the preserve of Northwoods GECs but fortunately not. This is my first Camel and I'm very impressed with the colour and character, nice thicker slabs which I think is very important on a single-spring or single-blade knife. Very nicely turned out knife indeed and Jamie put a fine edge on the blades, that's a bonus too as GEC edges are usually dullish.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. pmew

    pmew

    Oct 2, 2011
    Although not a northwoods it is a bohn - but it's a good bohn indeed! :)


    - Paul
     
  5. blademan 13

    blademan 13 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 25, 2000
    Will,

    My pleasure, for sure. It was indeed a fine knife, just had too many examples to choose from. Can't keep them all as they say...

    I hope it serves you well and with the brass liners and n/s bolsters it may just well add some variety to your 38's!
     
  6. wlfryjr

    wlfryjr Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 20, 2011
    I have once said,I believe these working knives were developed for the gardener and pruner that was a "cut above" the common gardener. Maybe for an Earl of Wharncliffe or some other noble gardener that wanted a knife of use, but beautifully constructed.

    She could work all day and still be lovely in the evening.
     
  7. Will Power

    Will Power

    Jan 18, 2007
    It's a fascinating idea Lyle. Not only a different pattern and beautifully put together, but also immensely practical. The other day I was cutting a long mixed hedge at the country place that gives on to a field. Had to negotiate a ditch and some rough grass where I've seen snakes several times (I am not a fan of them:eek::barf: ) before I could start cutting. No machinery for me, I prefer a lightweight pair of sharp shears, and as the hedge is not out of control, shears work best. For removing suckers or long plants growing in the hedge the Lick Creek worked flawlessly, the small Hawk is the man for these type of tasks, effortless. At the end of it a nice job and having a beautiful knife in your pocket that's made its contribution, is contentment of the right sort!

    Would be excellent to find out more about its origins, maybe somebody will unearth an old catalogue that sheds light on it or from an early c20th gardening book such as the English were keen on? We wait and hope.

    In the meantime, another run of Lick Creeks with some choice Stag on it or an appropriate synthetic would be just the job to tide us over:D

    Many thanks, Will
     
  8. pertinux

    pertinux

    Feb 1, 2012
    Sometimes our brains forget to explain to us what we already know. Ahem:

    [​IMG]

    (Currently, Bohn/KSF is the catalyzing camel connection, not "Northwoods" exclusively.)

    ;)

    What a beauty!

    Lyle's Farmer's Jack was my "Knife of 2015," as seen here.

    The cut to the chase, from the post linked above:

    :D

    ~ P.
     
  9. wlfryjr

    wlfryjr Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 20, 2011
    You guys make me smile.

    Will ,I have a reprint of an 1885 Wostenholm catalog( their first of such,although stated their business predated that century) and standing out beautifully among the other pruners was the farmers jack.( I still wonder where Levine got that term). Earliest dated catalog cut,I have seen them listed in the "town patterns"book, I expect was earlier,but I haven't seen those Town patterns dated.

    It was simply listed as and with the other pruning knives,peach pruners and the more robust bladed common pruners.It was amazing to see the various widths of the pruning blades.

    It was on Plate 1,first among their listings. There are 14 different styles of pruners,this excludes their budding and grafting knives. All are the single bladed hawkbills we are accustomed to,except the farmers jack and one pruner included a saw blade.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2016
  10. glocktenman

    glocktenman Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    These are super. I'm going to start looking for one to keep.
     
  11. glocktenman

    glocktenman Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Well, I have looked most all of these over that I can. I saw a few new ones that have micarta, wood and camel bone handles. The two I seem to come back to are the Lick Creek jigged antique yellow pick bone and the smooth ivory bone. It's odd that these two knife handles are so different yet both appeal to me. One with smooth bone and one with jigged bone. I think it maybe the long bar shield on them that is attracting me. The newer ones have a similar bar with some fancy ends but they just don't do it for me for some reason. LOL. There is one with a Tidioute shield, dark blue jigged bone and no etch on the blade. But, no joy on that one either for me. The Orchard Gems with the diamond shield are very nice looking and there's even one with similar jigged bone like the antique yellow pick bone on the Lick Creek but I'm more attracted to the long bar shield on the Lick Creeks ones. Maybe its the etching too that is pulling me toward the Lick Creek. Maybe it's the idea and history behind it. I saw in the other thread on these 38s where the design for the Orchard Gem came from as far as the diamond shield.

    Lyle, was there a similar knife in the past that you based the long bar shield on you're design for the Lick Creek 38 models? I may have missed it in the other thread if it's pictured there. This is becoming a bit torturous to try to pick one I prefer. However, I'm working in the right direction.
     
  12. Old Hunter

    Old Hunter Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 12, 2012
    A most satisfying knife - thanks again Lyle for bringing this pattern back to life. OH

    [​IMG]
     
  13. blademan 13

    blademan 13 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 25, 2000
    Glocktenman,

    Here is to hoping the blue bone may grow on you. While not the most beautiful of the #38's, she is still quite attractive ;). Definitely something to hold you over until something fancier can be had. Just let me know if you want a test drive, more than willing to send her your way:thumbup:
    [​IMG]
     
  14. glocktenman

    glocktenman Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Jamie,

    Thanks for your kind and generous offer. I'll PM you.
     
  15. glocktenman

    glocktenman Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Lyle, was there a similar knife in the past that you based the long bar shield on you're design for the Lick Creek 38 models? I may have missed it in the other thread if it's pictured there. This is becoming a bit torturous to try to pick one I prefer. However, I'm working in the right direction.
     
  16. wlfryjr

    wlfryjr Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 20, 2011
    Yes Randy,about half or more had the bar shield , Wostenholm's might have been the biggest influence, but there was a lot to look at. I think aesthetically it compliments the frame best.

    It's simplicity draws a focus on the whole,not of it's own,but it does appeal to the eye in contrast to the curves.

    If I had got my order for the boys knives in time, I would have appealed for a small bar shield on mine. I'm thinking about making it a signature of what I SFO.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2016
  17. wlfryjr

    wlfryjr Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 20, 2011
    Examples:

    [​IMG]
    Top to bottom: Utica, Cutsure, Enderes, Crown, A Jordan, H A Dreer

    [​IMG]
    All Wostenholms

    [​IMG]
    Wibert,Adolph Blaich,Camillus,Utica UTK,Challenge

    [​IMG]
    Valley Forge?( This might be Wostenholm),Remington,Schrade( made for Peter Henderson Co NY)Valley Forge

    There's more Randy.Seems a standard ,unless they used their Co. shield
     
  18. wlfryjr

    wlfryjr Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 20, 2011
    Thanks OH(Bruce?), I'm guessing from AAPK remembrances,and thanks to Bill Howard.
     
  19. PNWJimbo

    PNWJimbo

    711
    Sep 29, 2015
    So, I bought these two (47 and 38) together. Taking them out of their tubes, I was blown away by them both, but the 38 the real beauty. The jigging in mine has really continuous lines that feel amazing under the finger. The brazilian rosewood is such a rich color, and that beaver shield is just 100% awesome (IMO) :cool::thumbup: When you have the secondary blade out, the hawkbill fills the inside of your palm, leaving the perfect amount of room for your index finger to come down on top of it for an incredible grip. This knife is perfect, and I can't wait to make a deal with someone who wants to get rid of their whittler :p

    (if the blade seems weird or has spots its just a little mineral oil I put on because this one has been sitting in the tube... that big ass 47 was too tempting to play with first :rolleyes: If I were to go back and only purchase one of these though, it would be the 38. But since I've already patnia'd the 47... guess I gotta keep them both :D
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    You can find the unboxing video I did here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yewm5mvUzgs
     
  20. glocktenman

    glocktenman Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 20, 2008
    Cool looking beaver tail with the wood handles.
     

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