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ID/Value of two Japanese Swords

Discussion in 'Sword Discussion' started by WillB, Jan 21, 2019.

  1. WillB

    WillB Gold Member Gold Member

    210
    Feb 3, 2007
    These two swords were brought back WWII. They are owned by a friend of mine, and I am trying to help her ID and, ascertain value. I know swords like that can vary widely in value. Here are some pics. What would be next steps to get the needed info on these two swords?

    Unknown-1.jpeg Unknown-3.jpeg Unknown-4.jpeg Unknown-5.jpeg Unknown-6.jpeg Unknown-7.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2019
  2. WillB

    WillB Gold Member Gold Member

    210
    Feb 3, 2007
    No one has anything? A friend of mine said "If you are positive it's a legit WWII bring back, it will be a Type 95 NCO Shin Gunto (New Military Sword) most of which were made in 1935"
     
  3. Triton

    Triton Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 8, 2000
    I'm sure one of our katanaphiles will be along shortly. From Dr. Rich Stein's Japanese sword index:

    Prior to 1945, NCO shin-gunto, non-commissioned officers swords, have all metal tsukas (handles) made to resemble the traditionally cloth wrapped shin-gunto swords. The first model had an unpainted copper hilt. On later models the hilts were made of aluminum and painted to resemble the lacing (ito) on officer's shin-gunto swords. These swords will have serial numbers on their blades and are ALL machine made, without exception. The serial numbers are simple assembly or manufacturing numbers; they are not serial numbers of blades as issued to specific soldiers. If the sword is all original, the serial numbers on the blade, tsuba, saya and all other parts should match.

    Some full blade shots of the other sword would probably be helpful as well.
     
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  4. WillB

    WillB Gold Member Gold Member

    210
    Feb 3, 2007
    Oddly, I saw no numbers or markings on the blades on casual inspection. I will tell her to take additional pics of the blades. Thanx
     
  5. Triton

    Triton Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 8, 2000
    That is interesting. Maybe not all of them were marked or maybe this one is a reproduction although I cannot imagine anyone reproducing these.
     
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  6. WillB

    WillB Gold Member Gold Member

    210
    Feb 3, 2007
    If they were reproduced it was during the war, which does not make a lot of sense. The women who owns them is mid 70s and said her father returned with them after WWII and left them to her.
     
  7. WillB

    WillB Gold Member Gold Member

    210
    Feb 3, 2007
    No more sword SMEs ?
     
  8. Triton

    Triton Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 8, 2000
    There are various Japanese sword fora as well where you may have more luck. I think that one is called the Nihonto forum. The one is obviously a gunto (machine made low quality sword) the other I am unsure of without better pictures and even then I'm no expert on Japanese swords. Other than that I'm sure one of our experts will be along (they say patience is a virtue... :) )
     
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  9. SouthernComfort

    SouthernComfort

    427
    Dec 8, 2011
    Hi, Sorry to say there is not enough information provided to help you. In order to know anything about the blade we must first see the blade.

    Even the photo of the silver handle is not full length, therefore who can say if is a type 1 or 2 variant. Likely type 2, but ?? Never seen the sarute ana filled that way.

    Regarding the first sword there are no photos of the blade. The photos shown tell me nothing about it.

    The one photo of the second sword is not enough to gather anything more than it is long and pointy and probably either a shin gunto or NCO sword. ??

    You need to provide photos which are in focus and cover the entire blade. That means a full length shot of the bare blade (no habaki), in focus close ups of the tang (both sides), close ups of any inscriptions on the tang or anywhere else, close ups of the tip (yes, in focus).

    Notice my reiteration of the words in focus. Posting out of focus photos is a waste of time.
     
    WillB likes this.
  10. WillB

    WillB Gold Member Gold Member

    210
    Feb 3, 2007
    Much appreciated. I will work on the above if she wants to pursue it.
     
  11. sliceofaloha

    sliceofaloha Gold Member Gold Member

    210
    Oct 4, 2018
    I have one with the basic “tsuba”, both of those tsuba seem a cut above basic, not sure if they are period correct.

    This is what I am calling the basic tsuba:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. SouthernComfort

    SouthernComfort

    427
    Dec 8, 2011
    Neither of his tsuba are military or gunto versions. It is not uncommon to find mis-matched koshirae such as these. GI's were known put anything that would fit on them, as they didn't know better or care. The unscrupulous Japanese did the same thing post war to sell to tourists who didn't know better.
     
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