Introduction/advice on CAK

Discussion in 'Himalayan Imports' started by Amko, Jun 19, 2017.

  1. Amko

    Amko

    485
    Jun 15, 2017
    Mr Azar, anything more than my 16.5 inch CAK would be overkill. At 31 oz. mine is just about all the CAK I can handle...
     
  2. ndoghouse

    ndoghouse

    Aug 26, 2010
    You might be surprised? If you ever get a chance to play with an 18" 0r better you could be very hungry for them bigger chips! It has been known to happen:) I love my 20" ers.
    Enjoy everything in between tho!
     
    George Azar likes this.
  3. Amko

    Amko

    485
    Jun 15, 2017
    ndog, I do have a twenty inch Shree Paanch Chirra (General) (5 Fullers, hardest to forge and craft, 5 X riveted full tang handle ) from another reputed khukuri maker in Kathmandu, Khukuri House. At 45 oz. it calls for two handed use.

    That magnum CAK is obviously even more humongous, so given that 20" is my outer limit, I can only admire it as a work of art, which it no doubt is.

    Mr Azar, how are you enjoying it? Thanks for saving me from that magnum CAK...
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2017
  4. Amko

    Amko

    485
    Jun 15, 2017
    Isn't there an easier way to put a convex grind on a CAK, say by using a diamond stone (think EZ-Lap CD4…) or a simple butchers steel (which is currently handy)?
     
  5. ndoghouse

    ndoghouse

    Aug 26, 2010
    Ive used the edge of my flat DMT diamond stones to touch up the recurve part and the belly you can use the flat part just like any knife. Doing the recurve part is probably doing more burnishing than actual sharpening but it works for me. A steel works just fine too. I have one of them ceramic JA Henkels "steels" (piece of crap btw. It chips too easily). A regular steel will work fine. Sharpie the edge so you can see where your sharpening. Theres usually plenty enough slop in ones sharpening technique that you will end up with a convex edge anyway. Just be light with it.
     
  6. Amko

    Amko

    485
    Jun 15, 2017
    Thanks for your input ndog.

    Ever used the chakmaks to touch up the edge of your khukuris? If yes, do you use the chakmak edge or the flat side as you stroke?
     
  7. ndoghouse

    ndoghouse

    Aug 26, 2010
    Dang! I went to go get my CAK and show ya but this lil fella wasnt lettin me havin it?

    [​IMG]

    Maybe he'll put it down and ill show ya tomorrow?

    Use the Chak to flatten or burnish the edge back into place. Dont try to "cut" it like one of them cheap carbide kitchen sharpening wheel things. If you get good enough and your Chak happens to be hard enough you might attempt to cut metal with it but not generally recommended. Id peen it or pound it out flat before Id cut it out. Just my preference. Dress the edge till it performs. If you aint shaving with it then it dont need to shave.
     
    Amko likes this.
  8. Amko

    Amko

    485
    Jun 15, 2017
    Seriously cute troll, if that's the word!

    Guess you use the chakmak edge to burnish?

    How's this to put an edge on a Khukuri or will it destroy a convex grind:

    https://www.radacutlery.com/best/kitchen-knives/quick-edge-knife-sharpener

    Then again I guess I'll just stay with the sharpening steel and focus on improving technique with a non HI Khukuri. I'm trying not to scratch the blade while I sharpen, basically.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2017
  9. H A W K

    H A W K

    31
    Jun 21, 2017
    I am far from an expert on sharpening, but it looks to my eye that the Rada sharpener in the link would put a concave edge on the knife, rather than convex.
     
  10. Bawanna

    Bawanna Moderator Moderator

    Dec 19, 2012
    Ditto that for me. I wouldn't use it. I used to be good at sharpening but I've lost the touch I guess.

    I use the fine sandpaper mouse pad method most of the time.

    If you scratch the blade, something you mentioned you were trying to avoid, just go to finer paper until you remove the scratches.
    The sharpie NDog mentions often helps keep you where you want to be and not scratching where you don't want to be.

    I try not to overthink it. They sharpen them on rocks over in Nepal.
     
  11. Amko

    Amko

    485
    Jun 15, 2017
    Thanks gentlemen. Duly noted.
     
  12. Amko

    Amko

    485
    Jun 15, 2017
    1. Have a broad brown leather belt on a hook. Maybe I could use that as a strop but I have no backing wood or buffing compound at present.

    2. Have a butchers steel. I could use it to hone the edge.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2017
  13. ndoghouse

    ndoghouse

    Aug 26, 2010
    Exactly:thumbsup:

    Amko: That thing you showed in the link is exactly what im saying NOT to use. It is made for knives you get at the dollar store for $3 and when the edge gets so messed up you cant do anything with it throw it away. Its quick alright. It will quickly destroy a convex edge by definition because it is a concave sharpener. Id stick with the sandpaper or butchers steel if thats all you have access to. I do prefer ceramic rods and diamond stones tho. I use all kinds of stones and such on mine anyway just depends on what day it is and where I last left them:D
     
    George Azar likes this.
  14. Amko

    Amko

    485
    Jun 15, 2017
    I tried the sucker (already had it from before) on an older non HI Khukuri and the edge is shaving sharp...how do I re profile to a convex edge? Use the steel?

    What's the deal with concave edges...do they not stay sharp for long?
     
  15. NapalmCheese

    NapalmCheese

    548
    Aug 24, 2006
    How do you reprofile? By sharpening your blade on something abrasive and yielding, like a mousepad covered in sandpaper.

    What's the deal with concave edges? A hollow ground edge has less metal behind he actual edge, this makes them less strong, but more slicey. Likewise it makes them less useful for certain things like chopping wood.
     
  16. Amko

    Amko

    485
    Jun 15, 2017
    Thanks NapalmCheese...how do you cover a mousepad over sandpaper ;)
     
  17. Amko

    Amko

    485
    Jun 15, 2017
  18. NapalmCheese

    NapalmCheese

    548
    Aug 24, 2006
    I just lay it on top. You can also tape it down, but that usually doesn't last for very long.
     
  19. Bookie

    Bookie

    Mar 25, 2014
    The World's Bestest Curved Spine is honed down to .5 micron. That's 60,000 grit. One does not ever thumb the blade to see if it's sharp. If that happens, you will find that you have just sacrificed yourself to Kali. I use water stones and a lot of elbow grease to get it down that fine....and start with 100 grit.
     
    Amko likes this.
  20. Bawanna

    Bawanna Moderator Moderator

    Dec 19, 2012
    Worlds Bestest???? Blasphemy!
     

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