1. Click here to enter the drawing for your chance to win an Ontario Knives Spec Plus SP8 Machete Survival Knife & Ka-Bar Dozier Folding Hunter, , Bladeforums.com swag or memberships!

    Be sure to read the rules before entering, then help us decide next week's giveaway by hitting the poll in that thread! Entries close at midnight, Saturday Sept 7!

    Once the entries close, we'll live stream the drawing on Sunday, Sept 8 at 5PM Eastern. Tune in to our YouTube channel TheRealBladeForums for a chance to win bonus prizes!

    Questions? Comments? Post in the discussion thread here

It followed me home (Part 2)

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Steve Tall, Jun 12, 2014.

  1. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Amos: “Pa ses wee need ta take tha waall dewn”

    Elijah: “Aye, it needs sem holz med”

    Amos: “Raight, weel, don’t just ständ there, go fetch ma tha Holzaxt!”
     
  2. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    LoL. It’s hard to convey how big it is.
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Hairy Clipper

    Hairy Clipper Basic Member Basic Member

    199
    Feb 28, 2009
    I have not seen one of those in my lifetime. I wonder if the big poll was an after thought addition to the first one or two? Needs more mass to split better? Gosh, now that we have it stuck, what should we do? I think a big bowl of Wheaties and a pound or two of bacon would be needed to start the day off with if a fellow was intending to swing that all day! I am a bit curious what book page 74 is from? It seems I have always been drawn to unique things, perhaps that is why axes and logging tools in general have kept my interest, there certainly is variety. Your Holzaxt is very cool and a nice find!
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2019
    Fmont, A17, ithinkverydeeply and 2 others like this.
  4. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    That’s from Tom Lamond's(the yesteryear tools guy) Axes and Associated Hand Tools. It’s a great resource!
     
    Hairy Clipper, Fmont and Agent_H like this.
  5. Hairy Clipper

    Hairy Clipper Basic Member Basic Member

    199
    Feb 28, 2009
    Thank you for the title and author! I am afraid I read so much I married a librarian.
     
    Fmont, A17, Agent_H and 2 others like this.
  6. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    Mar 2, 2013
    I can't quite picture the mechanics of using the poll extension to pry the bit free, but ok, maybe there's a special kind of lever companion that goes with it, or you just use your can't hook, better than stressing the handle for sure. The beak on the bit is an intentional & functional element useful for hooking a billet and pulling it in. And it looks like the bit's also welded on.

    The decorative stamping, composed of standard elements - crescents and flowers/fruit , the smids initials in the center- is in fact derived from the christian cross rather than the Tree of Life or Yggdrasil, similar ideas, the one predating the other. Just goes to show the Christians and Pagans were friends. The Tree of Life is a different composition though of which there are two versions common on axes, the barren and the fruitful or maybe it's the male and the female representation. In this stamp you show from AH we can see clearly the central cross and the repetition of the three stars representative of the godhead. It's my guess, 'cause I never saw it written down anywhere but I like to think the crescent's symbolic for the sky where Heaven's supposedly located and those three characters reside. You will typically see the cross and ToL/Y symbols together but obviously space here is limited.

    Which reminds me of something very coincidental and timely. Just yesterday I randomly grabbed one axe from the rack to do some work and it happened to be also a small axe. This one has only space for an abbreviated ToL/Y on it.[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2019
    Square_peg, Trailsawyer, A17 and 4 others like this.
  7. Fmont

    Fmont Gold Member Gold Member

    856
    Apr 20, 2017
    I had no idea how big that thing is until i saw it next to the beer can :D:D

    Very, very cool.
     
  8. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    Mar 2, 2013
    Why can't I get this to "play"?
     
  9. Fmont

    Fmont Gold Member Gold Member

    856
    Apr 20, 2017
    That's the sign behind the axe, I'm afraid
     
  10. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    Mar 2, 2013
    Oh.;)
     
  11. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    Thanks for all the great insights Ernest! Sorry about the optical illusion.
    The poll is so wide where that protrusion is that it’s easy to get something under the edge of it. A hammer, prybar or any such thing would do, certainly a purpose made lever. I hooked it with back of a 1 1/5lb cross peen hammer for a demonstration, it worked.

    And yes Fmont that beer is almost hidden behind it in that photo, I had to try to leave a little poking out, it is a monster!
     
    Square_peg and Fmont like this.
  12. jblyttle

    jblyttle Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2014
  13. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    Leave it to @Agent_H to have a key to these marks. The likeness of the christian symbols in 35 & 36 is striking! And to your point about the blending of these cultures. The same axe of agentH’s has another mark on it that does look to be one of the Yggdrasil trees.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2019
  14. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Symbol #42 “against witches” is especially useful and quite specific.

    I like to think there should be an arrow pointing to Midgard with the text, “You are here” lol.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    There probably were many versions and representations of Pagan/Christian symbolism arrived at over time and regions.

    I don’t really know what the markings are with certainty but those styles of symbols interest me- that and they obviously imbue axes with supernatural qualities.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2019
  15. Fmont

    Fmont Gold Member Gold Member

    856
    Apr 20, 2017
    This is an aside, but at one point I had the runes for "giant hail" painted on one of my shotguns. Lol.
     
  16. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    Mar 2, 2013
    It's rare to see mythical symbolism on Scandinavian axes, at least the functional working tools. I've seen it once with the life, sun, star symbol like figure 7 & 8 on an old timmerbila. For the most part they keep it pretty secular limited to the smids personal sign sometimes a year inscribed That's why I don't really get the association with the Norse mythic symbols. In as far as you encounter them on axes there the reference is to the German , or let's say central Europe versions. So if the stamps pictured from the axe of AH are Scandinavian they are simply copied from probably German examples, just like that one Baltic guy does on some of his new made axes.
    Here are some more standard ToL and cross symbols just to establish the pattern[​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2019
  17. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Beautiful axe Ernest.
    I acquired the breitbeil from a man in The Netherlands and don’t know where it was made. I assumed somewhere between there and Austria and not Scandinavia.

    I’m enjoying the conversation about the markings. Tree of a Life symbolism seems to have been a bit pan-cultural.
     
  18. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    That makes sense and the Deutsch- Pennsylvanian culture my axe is from are not Dutch of course but rather from (Deutschland) Germany, Switzerland, and Austria.
    [​IMG]
     
    Fmont, Yankee Josh, A17 and 2 others like this.
  19. Fmont

    Fmont Gold Member Gold Member

    856
    Apr 20, 2017
    This is reminding me of Germanic hexes that became Americana. I think this board is where I learned of them. There's so much cultural exchange from migrations, both ancient and the era of the New World, that ideas travelled and morphed in really interesting ways. Hard to tease apart, but makes it all the more interesting.
     
  20. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    Mar 2, 2013
    I think this particular axe is a good example and if I call it a bit of a mutt it shouldn't be taken as an offense, just that it is no thorough bread. There are definitely recognizable elements though nothing in pure form, almost as if it's the product of someones vague and distant memories. Just the skewed angle of the decorative element for one thing.
    Anything Dutch would predate the other European influence by a couple hundred years and be truly rare and exceptional. I have heard of two Dutch timber framing tools existing in the USA associated with the earliest settlements in the New York area which before it was called New York was called New Amsterdam, Brooklyn being the Anglicization of Brukelen, a small village south of Amsterdam where the rich merchants had their weekend country houses.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2019

Share This Page