1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

  2. Click here to enter the drawing for your chance to win a Kizer Sheepdog & Ka-Bar Dozier Folding Hunter, , Bladeforums.com swag or memberships!

    Be sure to read the rules before entering, then help us decide next week's giveaway by hitting the poll in that thread! Entries close at midnight, Saturday August 10!

    Once the entries close, we'll live stream the drawing on Sunday, July 28 at 5PM Eastern. Tune in to our YouTube channel TheRealBladeForums for a chance to win bonus prizes!

    Questions? Comments? Post in the discussion thread here

Let's see some of man's best friend! A dog thread......

Discussion in 'Evans Knife and Tool' started by Brian.Evans, Mar 10, 2015.

  1. Brian.Evans

    Brian.Evans Registered Member

    Aug 20, 2011
    Enough knives for now. Let's see those four legged fiends, the stealer of covers, the hunting, hiking, running companions. The front porch sitters and back yard runners.

    I grew up with labs and I always thought they were the best dogs ever. But I think our family dog takes the cake. She's a boxer/pitt mix and she's about the perfect dog. We have five kids, including two that were baby babies when we got her. She has never snapped once at them or even gotten upset. She just takes it and retaliated with licks and snuggles. She's a hell of a dog and I don't know what we'll do when she's gone.

    This is Lexy.

    These were about two months after we got her. It was one of those nights, you know the kind. Sitting on the porch :/ a wooden rocker, perfect weather, glass of whiskey, dog beside you, playing with knives on your lap. Just a good night.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Sitting with the babies in a "tent." She wiggled her way right in there amongst the blankets and toys and kids. It was a pretty awesome tent, if I do say so myself.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    This is her favorite spot, on my wife's lap. She's getting fat now though, so it's harder. The dog, not my wife. Probably ought to make that clear, in case she figure out how to see these posts!
    [​IMG]


    So that's mine. Let's see yours.
     
  2. sheathmaker

    sheathmaker Custom Leather Sheaths Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    May 18, 2005
    This is "Elam". He's a pure bred rough coat Jack Russell. and he has been my shop partner for a long time.

    Paul
     
  3. Brian.Evans

    Brian.Evans Registered Member

    Aug 20, 2011
    Paul, I don't think your photo came through, unless it's just my phone messing up.
     
  4. sheathmaker

    sheathmaker Custom Leather Sheaths Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    May 18, 2005
    It was not your phone, it was me! It's there now.

    Paul
     
  5. Brian.Evans

    Brian.Evans Registered Member

    Aug 20, 2011
    I've never seen a rough coat JRT. Looks pretty neat. I'm assuming it's pretty wire-y?

    Does he like people or is he standoffish? I've been around both types of Jack Russels
     
  6. sheathmaker

    sheathmaker Custom Leather Sheaths Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    May 18, 2005
    His coat is just a slight bit wiry, but pretty soft. He loves, loves, loves the family, but is very protective beyond that.
    He loves to squirrel hunt (by himself) and chase them at every opportunity.

    Paul
     
  7. Matthew Gregory

    Matthew Gregory Chief Executive in charge of Entertainment Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jan 12, 2005
    I have a strong conviction that a dog should be sixty-five percent defender and thirty-five percent best friend, and my current boy is just that.

    [​IMG]

    Brokk was rescued from a sick bastard that 'intended to breed' him, leaving him chained outside to live in his own feces. When we got him, he was horribly malnourished and full of worms, even after the rescue organization had de-wormed him twice. When we took him for a 'test' walk with our previous dog to make sure he'd be accepted, it was early November and all the leaves had fallen from the trees in the park we brought them to. As soon as his feet hit the dried leaves, he froze in panic - he'd never experienced anything like it before, and you could see the fear in his eyes. We worked with him diligently for months, and just like most bullmastiffs, he's become the confident guardian he was meant to be. Unlike most bullmastiffs, however, he's indefatigable. His endurance for such a powerful dog is outrageous. The above photo was taken after I set out to determine what it would take to 'knock him down'. It was a hot summer day, and we did a five mile off-leash hike in the local forestry, followed by two miles of running in the neighborhood. I had nothing left to give, either, but managed to keep him going until we got home to the back deck, where I snapped this photo of him. He was done!!!!


    Here's a more recent shot, when the temps were at minus ten:

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Brian.Evans

    Brian.Evans Registered Member

    Aug 20, 2011
    Matt, I just told my wife today that I wanted a mastif for our next dog, or maybe even right now with this dog. One of my buddies has one and he is a great dog. Brokk looks like he's doing great now!
     
  9. jobasha11

    jobasha11

    Oct 9, 2013
    Matt,
    Our most recent dog was living similar to what yours was. It was malnourished and chained in a shed year round with a chain he could barely pull. He wouldn't bark or show any emotion for the first few days we had him. He's doing fine now and wont shut up!

    Ill get a pic up of him and my other dog later Brian.
     
  10. Matthew Gregory

    Matthew Gregory Chief Executive in charge of Entertainment Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jan 12, 2005
    Do your homework. I think most people get one, thinking they're just larger versions of dogs they've owned before, and this just isn't the case. They're incredibly primitive dogs, and many of the cues that would signify possible aggressive action isn't displayed. Where a shepherd, a Doberman or even a Pitbull with give you some posture, or even a bark or growl, these just react. Instantly. My last one was 160 pounds, and I've NEVER witnessed an animal that could move from a crouched position to fifteen feet away as fast. There's no warning.

    I'm not trying to dissuade anyone from getting one of these dogs, please understand. I just think people don't realize what they're getting into, and a dog this powerful that isn't properly controlled and trained is EXTREMELY dangerous. My dogs have always been the best family cuddlers, and are truly big teddy bears with my niece and nephew, but they will NOT accept what they perceive as an intruder, and will not give you an opportunity to interject if you aren't aware of the situation.
    Like I said before, 65/35. I agree fully with environment and training being critical to a dog's behavior, but that doesn't preclude the intent and purpose of the breeding, and instinct has a strong influence.
     

Share This Page