Lets use those axes for what they were ment for.

dcpritch

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2018
Messages
470
One of the restored axes is a Collins cruiser which I hung with a hickory haft from the gents at Lamaca. I took it out today for a spin and it cuts like a dream! We had some wind knock down an old balsam tree and the Collins went through it like a hot knife through butter. Pic here after limbing, before I got to bucking the main trunk. Nice sunny day for work in the woods.
BD5A98FE-8E47-4B45-85E0-08BCF5435DF9.jpeg
 

dcpritch

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 28, 2018
Messages
470
I had a thought about fashioning my own hafts, but the number of axes and time required for so many (I don’t have a band saw to cut shapes, so it was going to be some really long sessions with a draw knife) made that prohibitive. Most of the handles I purchased from House Handle in Missouri - hand picked, no varnish, AA stock. Their prices are great buying direct - a local box store sells House Handles but I’ve never seen one there as good as the ones I purchased directly from House. I also like the octagonal hafts more than I expected and will get some different sizes next time I make an order.
 
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Oct 17, 2020
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Got out of the house today with temp at 34 F, and bucked some of this downed, still green shaggy bark hickory with a Council Tool boys axe (foreground). I've been working on this tree for a while with this axe, a Plumb 3_2 on a 32 " handle, and a Husqvarna multi purpose axe. Once I get back into the lower trunk, I intend to chainsaw some 4 foot sections with hopes of riving out some good handle blanks. This is over a 2 foot thick trunk, so look to get a bunch with good grain.
SwedeFP
esN1L5z.jpg
 
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Oct 17, 2020
Messages
58
I'll be sure to check with Quinton. I've messed around with some riving on a big limb for practice, and I've got a good older stave from another tree that looks like it's going to make a good boys axe handle for a TT Flint edge. Man, I love hickory-it has so many uses!
SwedeFP
 
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Apr 8, 2013
Messages
706
Did a little more work on this big tree that is down across my trail.

Man, this Buck 120 is a beast! It really did a number on this log!!!!



Just kidding - I didn't do that with the buck. (that joke was for @David Martin ) I used my 4lb Jersey on 27" straight handle. This is the axe I usually carry along when doing trail maintenance. I really like this head/handle combo.



This past summer I had cut a notch in this blowdown, mostly just for something to do, but also just to make some progress on it until I could get a crosscut up there. When I got to the middle of the log, water started dripping out of it. I didn't make my initial cut wide enough to get all the way through it. So today, on my way back by it, I thought I'd chip away at it a little more. I started about 6-8" past the original cut to widen it out some. Everything was going well until I got down towards the center of the log, which must be still holding moisture, except now its frozen solid of course. The axe was making a ringing sound when it started hitting the really icy wood, so I decided that I'd stop there and not risk chipping my bit or something. I'll go work on it some more when it thaws out.
 
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706
Finally finished chopping out the above log, I'll show the whole progression here.

The log is a big blow down that's across the trail I maintain.

The original plan was to wait until I got crosscut certified (certification was cancelled last year due to covid) and then go saw the log out. But then one day towards the end of summer I was up there with the axe (always have an axe!) and though we'll, I'm here, maybe I can take some out of it.



Then hunting season happened and I didn't get back up there again until January, but by then all the water in the middle of the log was frozen solid so I could only chop down a ways before I got into the icy wood so I just widened the notch a little This picture is taken from the opposite of the log as the first picture



Next time I went up I made a new notch to establish the total width of the area I wanted to remove - but again, could only go down so far as the middle was still frozen. I think this was march.



Then I went back in April and the log had finally thawed. I started out widening and deepening the original notch and then took some out of the middle





Finally last week I went up and finished it up with a double bit. I decided not to chop it all the way through. I thought it made kind of a neat step over, and has some character. It is in a wilderness area so leaving some step overs is encouraged - not supposed to be perfectly manicured.



So, all in all, I worked on it over 5 different trips and used 4 different axes on it. First one was 4lb Jersey with 31" bent handle, second was 4lb Jersey with 27" straight handle, third was 4lb dayton with 27" straight handle, and then a 4lb michigan double bit with a 29" handle. The notch is at least 36" wide and the log is almost 24" across. I tried to count the rings and I got close to 200 but I'm not sure how accurate I was as I was. The wood is some kind of oak - likely northern red, as that's the dominant oak up there, and at least the outside was VERY hard, but all my axes bit right into it and knocked out some nice big chips. you should see the ground all around it - its like mulched with big oak chips. A lot of wood came out of that log. I stood up and jumped on that little strap I left though and it didn't creak or crack at all, so I think it will hold for a while yet.

Oh, and I'm now crosscut certified also, but chopping is more fun
 
Joined
Jul 25, 2017
Messages
2,300
Finally finished chopping out the above log, I'll show the whole progression here.

The log is a big blow down that's across the trail I maintain.

The original plan was to wait until I got crosscut certified (certification was cancelled last year due to covid) and then go saw the log out. But then one day towards the end of summer I was up there with the axe (always have an axe!) and though we'll, I'm here, maybe I can take some out of it.



Then hunting season happened and I didn't get back up there again until January, but by then all the water in the middle of the log was frozen solid so I could only chop down a ways before I got into the icy wood so I just widened the notch a little This picture is taken from the opposite of the log as the first picture



Next time I went up I made a new notch to establish the total width of the area I wanted to remove - but again, could only go down so far as the middle was still frozen. I think this was march.



Then I went back in April and the log had finally thawed. I started out widening and deepening the original notch and then took some out of the middle





Finally last week I went up and finished it up with a double bit. I decided not to chop it all the way through. I thought it made kind of a neat step over, and has some character. It is in a wilderness area so leaving some step overs is encouraged - not supposed to be perfectly manicured.



So, all in all, I worked on it over 5 different trips and used 4 different axes on it. First one was 4lb Jersey with 31" bent handle, second was 4lb Jersey with 27" straight handle, third was 4lb dayton with 27" straight handle, and then a 4lb michigan double bit with a 29" handle. The notch is at least 36" wide and the log is almost 24" across. I tried to count the rings and I got close to 200 but I'm not sure how accurate I was as I was. The wood is some kind of oak - likely northern red, as that's the dominant oak up there, and at least the outside was VERY hard, but all my axes bit right into it and knocked out some nice big chips. you should see the ground all around it - its like mulched with big oak chips. A lot of wood came out of that log. I stood up and jumped on that little strap I left though and it didn't creak or crack at all, so I think it will hold for a while yet.

Oh, and I'm now crosscut certified also, but chopping is more fun

Strong work!

Shoot me another email, I have been behind one eight ball after another since the start of this year.
I am sure we can figure out the leather together :D
 
Joined
Apr 8, 2013
Messages
706
I was hiking up a trail yesterday and found this hemlock tree across it. It had recently fallen and the tree was still alive (most have died around here and the rest are pretty sick right now from the wooly adelgid).



Luckily I had my axe with me (of course), so I went to work on it.

I made an initial notch and then kept widening and deepening the notch one layer at a time



although I started one layer that I didnt end up needing as I was able to get all the way through with the previous layer





The axe was my 4lb Flint edge Jersey on a 27" straight link handle. It's the axe I always take with me on the trail as it fits good in my pack





The log was about 13 inches across - Buck 120 is 12" long for scale.



one more for good measure

 

Square_peg

Basic Member
Joined
Feb 1, 2012
Messages
13,074
I was hiking up a trail yesterday and found this hemlock tree across it. It had recently fallen and the tree was still alive (most have died around here and the rest are pretty sick right now from the wooly adelgid).



Luckily I had my axe with me (of course), so I went to work on it.

I made an initial notch and then kept widening and deepening the notch one layer at a time



although I started one layer that I didnt end up needing as I was able to get all the way through with the previous layer





The axe was my 4lb Flint edge Jersey on a 27" straight link handle. It's the axe I always take with me on the trail as it fits good in my pack





The log was about 13 inches across - Buck 120 is 12" long for scale.



one more for good measure


Nice work!

With the hemlock dying I'm assuming you must be in the Northwest.
 
Joined
Apr 8, 2013
Messages
706
that's the first tictok video i've ever watched. I'm sure it will also be the last.

I bet the bit of that "axe" looks pretty good now since they likely chopped right into the driveway once they made it through that little tree

I like the claw hammer on hatchet technique. That's some advanced level axemanship right there.
 
Joined
Feb 4, 2005
Messages
262
Finally finished chopping out the above log, I'll show the whole progression here.

The log is a big blow down that's across the trail I maintain.

The original plan was to wait until I got crosscut certified (certification was cancelled last year due to covid) and then go saw the log out. But then one day towards the end of summer I was up there with the axe (always have an axe!) and though we'll, I'm here, maybe I can take some out of it.



Then hunting season happened and I didn't get back up there again until January, but by then all the water in the middle of the log was frozen solid so I could only chop down a ways before I got into the icy wood so I just widened the notch a little This picture is taken from the opposite of the log as the first picture



Next time I went up I made a new notch to establish the total width of the area I wanted to remove - but again, could only go down so far as the middle was still frozen. I think this was march.



Then I went back in April and the log had finally thawed. I started out widening and deepening the original notch and then took some out of the middle





Finally last week I went up and finished it up with a double bit. I decided not to chop it all the way through. I thought it made kind of a neat step over, and has some character. It is in a wilderness area so leaving some step overs is encouraged - not supposed to be perfectly manicured.



So, all in all, I worked on it over 5 different trips and used 4 different axes on it. First one was 4lb Jersey with 31" bent handle, second was 4lb Jersey with 27" straight handle, third was 4lb dayton with 27" straight handle, and then a 4lb michigan double bit with a 29" handle. The notch is at least 36" wide and the log is almost 24" across. I tried to count the rings and I got close to 200 but I'm not sure how accurate I was as I was. The wood is some kind of oak - likely northern red, as that's the dominant oak up there, and at least the outside was VERY hard, but all my axes bit right into it and knocked out some nice big chips. you should see the ground all around it - its like mulched with big oak chips. A lot of wood came out of that log. I stood up and jumped on that little strap I left though and it didn't creak or crack at all, so I think it will hold for a while yet.

Oh, and I'm now crosscut certified also, but chopping is more fun
Are you a member of a trail club?
 
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