Modified Production Knives (traditional only)

JohnDF

Gold Member
Joined
May 14, 2018
Messages
19,264
20210412_082303_copy_1224x1632.jpg
That's awesome!
It improves that knife so much in my eyes.
 

waynorth

Dealer / Materials Provider
Joined
Nov 19, 2005
Messages
24,572
The older Sfilato is a traditional Italian design! The old one, living in an archive drawer, was a generous gift from Rachel in TX, and it inspired me to ask, and Rhidian to make, this modern day version of Bone and Carbon Steel!! I step back in time, into Italy, every time I pocket this knife!! :cool: Sfilato Comp 1.jpg
I see it's starting to acquire a worthy patina!!
r8shell r8shell
 

mrknife

Gold Member
Joined
May 9, 2010
Messages
6,230
The older Sfilato is a traditional Italian design! The old one, living in an archive drawer, was a generous gift from Rachel in TX, and it inspired me to ask, and Rhidian to make, this modern day version of Bone and Carbon Steel!! I step back in time, into Italy, every time I pocket this knife!! :cool: View attachment 1567575
I see it's starting to acquire a worthy patina!!
r8shell r8shell

I wish that knife had an end cap ;)
 

r8shell

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Jan 16, 2010
Messages
19,461
The older Sfilato is a traditional Italian design! The old one, living in an archive drawer, was a generous gift from Rachel in TX, and it inspired me to ask, and Rhidian to make, this modern day version of Bone and Carbon Steel!! I step back in time, into Italy, every time I pocket this knife!! :cool: View attachment 1567575
I see it's starting to acquire a worthy patina!!
r8shell r8shell

I wish that knife had an end cap ;)
o_O Surely you jest!
 

r8shell

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Jan 16, 2010
Messages
19,461
This one came out a little weird. There seems to be some odd porosity to the bone causing the ink to bleed under the surface, especially around the end of the tail. Disappointing, but I guess it fits a murky underwater theme. 🤔

iHI3Aca.jpg

WPk2jZ6.jpg
 
Joined
Apr 24, 2019
Messages
785
This one came out a little weird. There seems to be some odd porosity to the bone causing the ink to bleed under the surface, especially around the end of the tail. Disappointing, but I guess it fits a murky underwater theme. 🤔

iHI3Aca.jpg

WPk2jZ6.jpg
It looks great to me, but if you are concerned about it maybe you could add a squid or octopus and explain the ink clouds that way :D
Still impressive work - I’d be lucky if I managed to scratch my initials in it legibly…
 

euroken

Gold Member
Joined
Aug 28, 2014
Messages
1,315
This one came out a little weird. There seems to be some odd porosity to the bone causing the ink to bleed under the surface, especially around the end of the tail. Disappointing, but I guess it fits a murky underwater theme. 🤔

iHI3Aca.jpg

WPk2jZ6.jpg

That looks so natural to me and if you hadn't said anything, I would have thought it was a feature on the bone!
 

jsdistin

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
May 27, 2016
Messages
1,042
This one came out a little weird. There seems to be some odd porosity to the bone causing the ink to bleed under the surface, especially around the end of the tail. Disappointing, but I guess it fits a murky underwater theme. 🤔

iHI3Aca.jpg

WPk2jZ6.jpg
Looks amazing!
 

r8shell

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Jan 16, 2010
Messages
19,461
It looks great to me, but if you are concerned about it maybe you could add a squid or octopus and explain the ink clouds that way :D
I like that idea!
That looks so natural to me and if you hadn't said anything, I would have thought it was a feature on the bone!
I'm coming around to liking it on this knife (seahorses are freaky looking anyway) but I wouldn't want it on some designs. I wonder if there's a way to predict it. I usually apply wax to the bone to avoid every odd bit of grain taking the ink, and I may have forgotten to do that this time. 🤔
Looks amazing!
Thank You!
 

penguin9

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 23, 2019
Messages
43
This is my first attempt at putting a handle on a knife. It was a lot of fun and definitely won't be my last. The knife is a new Boker Trapper that comes as a skeleton, ready for someone like me. I'm a lot more comfortable and experienced working with wood than I am with metal, so I wanted to start out in my area of strength (ok, maybe not that strong, but better than nothing!).

Here's the knife as I received it:

zXq4nAfl.jpg

ozNrALVl.jpg


And here's how it came out:

ayIbGq6h.jpg


ktYFHkrh.jpg


wjLjtCih.jpg



I used some walnut that came from a tree in my back yard. It's not stabilized, but walnut should be ok as-is. It's finished with Danish oil and a bit of wax.

All in all I'm pretty happy with how it came out. It's certainly not to the level of quality as the other posts in this thread, but I will get better.

If I do another like this, I would take it apart and then pin the covers on. It looks kinda bare without them.

Also, it arrived with a nail-breaker pull on the primary blade. I intended to do something about it before I did the handles, but in my excitement I forgot all about it. Oh, well. I've flushed it out and oiled it several times, but the back spring is just too strong. I'm not sure how to fix that yet, but I'll come up with something...
 
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