Pocket Blades

Discussion in 'Redmeadow Knives & T.Knotts Knives' started by Redmeadow Knives, Jan 3, 2020.

  1. Crazy Canuck

    Crazy Canuck Singing along with the voices in my head Gold Member

    Nov 24, 2013
    <-- Noob leather hobbyist...

    If you have one available, a drill press is your best friend for the holes, especially with that many layers. Mark them out first, then drill away. You can have yourself a nice bourbon with the time saved ;)
     
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  2. Belloc

    Belloc Gold Member Gold Member

    117
    Nov 10, 2018
    Hey Mike, yeah I've seen the drill press used in the videos, and I do have one, but I was thinking it'd be cool to have the diamond shaped holes. John seems to have them in his, so I'm not sure how he did it. I'm wondering if my stitching chisels are for smaller needles or something, because you can't see the holes at all in my completed sheath (see pic - I had a close-up, but it says it's too large to upload). In any case, thanks for the tip - I certainly may do that next time.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Redmeadow Knives

    Redmeadow Knives John Conner Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 29, 2010
    That looks great Embry, very clean. If you're just starting out with leather, that's damn nice work.

    You mentioned the diamonds, are you using a stitching/lacing chisel? The diamond chisels are pretty nice, ai think I use 3mm's.

    It's a pain in the arse but each time I glue a layer together, I run a needle through eah hole to make sure things are still lined up. Redressing the holes with the punch after its glued up and right before stitching helps those lines stay clean afterwards. I use to wet them when I stitched because I thought it would help the needle but that was a horrible idea and I ended up with a lot of wrinkles.

    I don't wrap the knife, I put a little bit of mineral oil on the ricasso and afterwards polish out any patina that occurs on the blade. Wrapping it is a pain and always seemed like it created more work than anything to me.

    I dunk the while thing inside and out. Here's a picture of one directly after wet forming, you can see how wet it still is. A little bit of mothers polish took it off in no time. The pattern is probably from me giving it small twists to open up the blade cavity.
    20200316_171749-01.jpeg
     
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  4. Redmeadow Knives

    Redmeadow Knives John Conner Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 29, 2010
    Oh, and a drill press works great for the welt and any other inner pieces.

    I struggle with leather work but if you guys have any questions about what tools I use for things just let me know and I'll take a picture. One thing that helped me was going into a Tandy store and actually handling all of the tools. They'll also let you test them out. An hour in their store is worth a year of website searches. You can see how big the needles are, the spacing on punches, etc.. The nearest one on Montana is over 5 hours away but I was able to go to one in Texas last year. My leather game has drastically improved since then. Between that amd quality leather, you cant go wrong.

    As far as needles go, I use harness needles with a very small eye. I'm not sure what size but I'll try to find my order info. Off the top of my head I want to say the brand is John or Johnson, I'll find it and get back to you.

    Another thing I forgot to mention is that when I glue up it looks like a pincushion. I use needles every few holes to line things up so when I connect the pieces, things are true.

    Hope this rambling helps
     
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  5. Redmeadow Knives

    Redmeadow Knives John Conner Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 29, 2010
    Cowbells etched and ready to epoxy.
    20200331_085814-01.jpeg
     
  6. jlauffer

    jlauffer Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 11, 2016
    Can't wait to see the burlap finished...might have to get another one of these!:D
     
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  7. Redmeadow Knives

    Redmeadow Knives John Conner Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 29, 2010
    Judging by the way the fronts of the scales finished out, I think it's going to be pretty cool.

    Glad you like yours, I think the price is right and they're really a nice little knife.
     
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  8. Redmeadow Knives

    Redmeadow Knives John Conner Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 29, 2010
    Got enough pocket blades thermal cycled for the Dibs and then some.

    20200331_120520-01.jpeg
     
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  9. Belloc

    Belloc Gold Member Gold Member

    117
    Nov 10, 2018
    Thanks, John. Yeah, I think all the stray marks I made helped hide the half dozen times I punched the needle through outside of the holes...

    Yes, I'm using diamond-shaped stitching chisels, 5mm, I believe. I saw one guy making a pouch sheath who glued on the welt, punched holes with a chisel through both layers, glued the other unpunched side to the two punched sides, then used an awl or fid to punch through the already punched layers and on through that third, unpunched layer, right before he stitched. This seemed like an interesting approach that would eliminate a lot of the misalignment problems with less futzing around. Of course, that was 3 layers, not 4, but might still work. I found an Osborne fid on Amazon for $7, so worth a try.

    I did put a needle at each corner when I glued the layers together - your pincushion approach would have lined things up a lot better.

    I guess the wrapping would work ok with looser pouch sheaths, or things that you construct differently, like an axe sheath. This was way too tight for wrapping. Your method makes sense, and it never would have occurred to me to just buff out the knife.

    Your idea of going to the store is a very good one, and there's a store less than half an hour from here. I went once last year for some rawhide strips for one of my boys, but haven't been back since I started playing with this stuff. I'll definitely check it out.

    Yeah, I think I may have used needles that were too big. I tried to research it carefully, but I must have gotten it wrong. Several places people complained about having trouble getting the thread through the eye of the needle, and I could have easily put the tips of two 1mm threads through at the same time. Ordered some smaller ones last night. I think you're referring to John James needles - they and C.S. Osborne seem to be the most common quality brands.

    Anyway, thanks for the rambling thoughts - super helpful to learn from your experience. I'm enjoying this a lot - it's fun to finish a project in a day or two instead of a month or two, and to have something useful at the end of it.
     
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  10. Redmeadow Knives

    Redmeadow Knives John Conner Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 29, 2010
    You're right, it is John James. I'll try to find which size, the small eye is so much easier to pull through than the standard Tandys that you could stick your finger in!

    When it comes to punching holes, a wing divider can come on handy. I punch the front piece first amd then the back. As I punch the back, I use the divider to measure the distance every 5 holes or so and make sure they are the same spacing as the holes in the front piece. It's a pain in the ass but it works well and keeps things lined up. I still end up using needle nose pliers to pull a few through.

    I'm self taught (a fancy way of saying I don't have a clue what I'm doing, completely winging it, and too cheap to take a proper course) and am sure there are easier ways to do things but I haven't found them yet.

    I hope some of that helps, it's hard to find good info that's detailed enough to learn from.
     
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  11. Belloc

    Belloc Gold Member Gold Member

    117
    Nov 10, 2018
    Thanks, yeah, the size could be useful. It doesn't help that there are several sizing systems for the needles - I think JJ uses a different one from Osborne, and JJ in the US is different from JJ in England. Etc., etc...

    Wing dividers! I had seen those in a couple of videos and looked for them a time or two, but couldn't remember what they were called. I'll look again.

    I'm not self-taught, I've watched videos! Seriously though, I've probably watched 10 people make a sheath, and every one does it differently. Different tools, different methods, different order of operations. I guess everybody eventually settles into something they're comfortable with (or can live with, anyway). Still helps to see what the options are.
     
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  12. SpyderPhreak

    SpyderPhreak Rocketman for hire Platinum Member

    Apr 13, 2004
    The Bone Linen turned out awesome!!! :thumbsup: :cool: Awesome works as always John! Congrats Sheldon, you got another nice Cowbell!!! :D

    Hey, I see mine!!! :D :p

    ETA - I actually see TWO of mine! :cool:
     
  13. Redmeadow Knives

    Redmeadow Knives John Conner Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 29, 2010
    Quick update on things.

    @trevitrace and @CoryMc epoxy is curing on your handles, they'll be ready to shape in the morning:thumbsup:

    @greatscoot and @SpyderPhreak you guys are up on deck. In addition to the options in the Pocket Blade info thread, I have some Blue Denim micarta also.

    Jared I have your material and know right handed, let me know the sheath you want, if it's a pocket clip, let me know which pocket. For example Left side, Front Pocket is what I would use as a right hander, I'll configure it however you want.

    Scott (damn I hope that's right) you wanted a pocket slip oif I'm not mistaken. Let me know if you have any questions as far as the handle materials.

    @gunspease let me know your pocket pick, I'm gonna work that in this go around:thumbsup:

    Two more things real quick.

    If you guys need out of your Dibs, just say the word. We can either pull it or postpone it, I'm easy peasy and completely understand.

    Also, I had mentioned a deluxe model outside of the Dibs when we started these, just doing one randomly, not available for order. Something with exotic wood, liners, fancy sheath, a handle material cowbell, etc. If you have any ideas on that let me know. Maybe a raffle or something like that would be fun.

    Thanks everybody.
     
  14. SpyderPhreak

    SpyderPhreak Rocketman for hire Platinum Member

    Apr 13, 2004
    John, let me think about the sheath. That's a good question, and honestly I haven't really thought about it yet.
     
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  15. gunspease

    gunspease Gold Member Gold Member

    529
    Nov 9, 2002
    Good to see them coming out quicker as these are handy little knives. Left front pocket please.
     
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  16. Redmeadow Knives

    Redmeadow Knives John Conner Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 29, 2010
  17. Redmeadow Knives

    Redmeadow Knives John Conner Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 29, 2010
    Another grit up, I'll contour the rest with files and sandpaper. Looking forward to this Burlap to pop.
    20200403_110925-01.jpeg
     
  18. SpyderPhreak

    SpyderPhreak Rocketman for hire Platinum Member

    Apr 13, 2004
    Shadetree's burlap micarta is nice stuff! :cool: I have some in a denim blue color on a Fiddleback. :D
     
  19. greatscoot

    greatscoot Heavens to Murgatroyd! Platinum Member

    Jul 21, 2012
    Scott is correct. If possible a clip for front right pocket would be most excellent. Give me a day or two to decide on handle material.

    Thanks
     
  20. Redmeadow Knives

    Redmeadow Knives John Conner Moderator Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 29, 2010
    Sounds good Scott, no rush and let me know if you have any questions. (Got your email, I'll get back to you today)
     

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