Rarest axe ever made?

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Hello. I was wondering if anyone knows what axe brand or line or maker is considered the rarest? Like very undocumented or super rare. Thanks.
 
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There are many very rare axes... Just off the top of my head 3 of them come to mind:
Findlay's Dadz Hatchetaxe
https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/1906-paper-ad-dadz-hatchetaxe-axe-1848003073
Pulaski Carter
https://archive.org/details/CarterAndCo1891/mode/2up
Warnock & Co
https://archive.org/details/WarnockEdgeTools1898/mode/2up
Hello. I was wondering if anyone knows what axe brand or line or maker is considered the rarest? Like very undocumented or super rare. Thanks.
 
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Square_peg

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There are way too many variables to answer this question. How many European makers went out of business 100s of years ago. Surely their axes are rare. 10s of 1000s of axes were one-offs made by an individual blacksmith. Each of these are one of a kind.

But I think you're asking what is the most valuable to collectors. At this time embossed axes in very good condition are a hot item. Lincoln axes always seem to draw a lot of interest. Any NOS paper label and manufacturer stamped axes will draw a lot of interest.
 

FortyTwoBlades

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Rarest ≠ most valuable or best known. Rarest would arguably be the very first axe ever made since there's only one and we have no way of finding it or knowing it was actually the very first. :D
 

FortyTwoBlades

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John King "President's Hunting Axes" are exceptionally rare. One of this sort was presented to Teddy Roosevelt as a gift, and the number known to exist is in the single digits.

20180719_125133_large.jpg
 
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There are many very rare axes... Just off the top of my head 3 of them come to mind:
Findlay's Dadz Hatchetaxe
https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/1906-paper-ad-dadz-hatchetaxe-axe-1848003073
Pulaski Carter
https://archive.org/details/CarterAndCo1891/mode/2up
Warnock & Co
https://archive.org/details/WarnockEdgeTools1898/mode/2up
I seen one of those Germantown hunters hatchets this weekend (in your first link). Great looking head. It was hanging up in a store as decoration complete with feathers and other pho pho refinements to make it look like a tomahawk. I think he wanted a buck fifty for it. It's still there.
 
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Those interested in the monetary value or rarity of an axe are my least favorite, those interested in using axes and hatchets and old tools for working wood and who are interested in history are my most favorite. I can't think of any good reason to be interested in the rarity or monetary value of an old tool.
 

Hickory n steel

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About 8 years ago at the local flea market this guy was selling a Plumb saddle cruiser in beautiful condition, like an idiot I scoffed at the $30 he wanted for it and passed 😔
I have never seen another since and am now starting to wonder if I'm remembering wrong.
I'm pretty sure, but because I've never seen another I have to wonder if it was just a Cruiser on a short handle.
Like a DB version of a house axe I suppose.

Come to think of it, the only time I've ever seen one of those was in the movie where the red fern grows.
I wonder if there ever was such a thing produced ?
 

Yankee Josh

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This is such a tough question to answer as has been said! The rarest is one we don't know about, naturally.
I think the rarest American axe pattern is probably, maybe, the Hoosier. Though there are other patterns I have never seen an example of, so the statement seems empty. See? Lol.
I'll share a few of the rarest axes I own.
I attached two Hoosiers. Hopefully you can view them. First post using the new format.
1Iq4PXh.jpg

Also you'll see a very clean Fulton Clipper etched axe. Made by Kelly, almost certainly in Alexandria, Indiana.
WxTNphz.jpg


And as was mentioned above a 2-1/2lb Jersey pattern. Lugged boys axes are very uncommon.
View attachment 1575906

However, this 4lb Isaiah Blood and its 1-1/4lb counterpart feel like the rarest axes I own. They were made
In the mid 1800's.
jNK1Cxb.jpg

6kEbP9A.jpg

RV0t6ct.jpg

I realize you didn't ask;
"What are the rarest axes you own"?
But I thought these would illustrate how even the "rarest" of axes can be in someone's collection, thereby disqualifying them from being the rarest axes. Ha.
I think hands down the rarest category are the new old stock axes. Paper labels, original paint, original haft and factory hang (if it's hung) etc. From the early 20th century and prior.
Similar to this Warren Axe & Tool Co fire axe;
jD3Hjfv.jpg

Now I'm remembering I should've shared my pioneer by Emerson Stevens.
Not nos by any means, but only 1 of 2 known to exist;
XbQmT1z.jpg

Okay I'll stop now. Haha.
So I suppose none of these can be considered the rarest, but they are rare indeed.
 
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Yankee Josh

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Ok so I am basiacly meaning if you could list some rare ones from about 1800 to today, like just a couple of very rare axe lines or brands. Not one offs.
I missed this comment before making my post. See the Bloods in my above post. You'll likely never see others like them!
But again even narrowed a little bit, it's still a very broad question. But a fun one. 😁
 

EngrSorenson

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Those interested in the monetary value or rarity of an axe are my least favorite, those interested in using axes and hatchets and old tools for working wood and who are interested in history are my most favorite. I can't think of any good reason to be interested in the rarity or monetary value of an old tool.

The Original Poster's question wasn't "What is Brent Halverson's favorite type of person?" or "What's a good reason to be interested in rare old tools?".
The OP might just be satisfying curiosity, and honestly, I'm glad he asked. Benjamin's contributed a real interesting one here. 👇👇👇

John King "President's Hunting Axes" are exceptionally rare. One of this sort was presented to Teddy Roosevelt as a gift, and the number known to exist is in the single digits.

20180719_125133_large.jpg

.
 
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