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Rough Rider & Related Slipjoints

Discussion in 'Traditional Folders and Fixed Blades' started by dalee100, Sep 10, 2008.

Tags:
  1. Lemmy Caution

    Lemmy Caution

    Aug 17, 2013
    I believe that hazy line is from their factory honing. Rough Rider Blades seem to usually be highly polished but their grinds are usually rather coarse. I suspect the haze is from buffing at a slightly lower grit than the rest of the blade polish. Make sense?
     
  2. FordRanger

    FordRanger

    221
    Mar 16, 2015
    That does make sense, as it does resemble a mirror finish that has had part of it "dulled." It certainly explains why it follows the edge line but does not change the actual geometry of the grind. Thanks!
     
  3. MarkPinTx

    MarkPinTx

    801
    Aug 21, 2003
    That would be my guess as well. I get kind of a similar effect from stropping.
     
  4. Pipeman

    Pipeman

    Dec 2, 2004
    I call it the RR Hamon line :D I have been noticing a different grind on some of the RR patterns,normally quite a course edge but in the newer three spring lockback canoe whittler it is a much finer grind BUT just as sharp as the toothy grind.

    Best regards

    Robin
     
  5. Captain O

    Captain O Banned BANNED

    Apr 14, 2015
    It seems that most of the forum members like the Rough Rider knife lineup. While I am enjoying the tapered, stiletto-type blade of my new Melon Tester (Toad Stabber) knife, I find myself wondering about the tempering of their 440A steel blades. Are they stout enough to peform daily cutting chores without having to resharpen it every time you turn around?

    Captain O
     
    Last edited: May 30, 2015
  6. supratentorial

    supratentorial

    Dec 19, 2006
    In my experience the blades are soft and easily become dented. But the soft steel is also easy to sharpen and can take a nice edge. They're decent knives at a low cost but I think the quality is often exaggerated.
     
  7. Mora2013

    Mora2013

    311
    Dec 1, 2013
    Does anyone have the Rough rider improved muskrat kb282? Does anyone know if there is a liner between the sheepfoot and clip blade?

    I'm also interested in the mini trapper pattern and was wondering if there was a liner between the two blades?
     
  8. oldmanrunning

    oldmanrunning Basic Member Basic Member

    Apr 22, 2013
    Just got this small stockman to keep my other RR company, i still can not believe what nice little knives they are for the price and with a bit of elbow grease the etching on the blade comes right off.

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Stareagle

    Stareagle

    41
    May 28, 2014
    oldmanrunning

    If you don't mind me asking how big is that small RR stockman? I've been looking at some small stockman knifes to expand my "coin pocket knife" collection and I think the RR model would do nicely but it would be nice to hear from someone who's actually handled one.
     
  10. Pipeman

    Pipeman

    Dec 2, 2004
    RR are heat treated to 58 rockwell which I believe is around max for 440a. I have never found that they dented or rolled with hard use and they can be stropped on your jeans and they come back very sharp indeed. I would put them up against Case any day in an out of the box cutting test and do it again after reprofiling both the case and RR. I've done it and the Case SS Lost badly.
    Here are a few pics of the newish canoe three spring lockback. The grind is quite different from the normal wide toothy edge, still cuts like a razor.
    Best regards

    Robin

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  11. supratentorial

    supratentorial

    Dec 19, 2006
    Is that value from the manufacturer or an independent test?

    It looks like there are uneven springs and a gap between the handle material and liner on the top right.

    Here's a comparison of one Rough Rider and a comparable pattern from Case. I have two examples of the Rough Rider 725 and both have the same faults. The spey blades on every Rough Rider sowbelly that I've seen also hit the liner hard.

     
  12. kootenay joe

    kootenay joe Banned BANNED

    Jan 30, 2015
    Jake, re uneven springs on the RR: do you mean that center locking spring looks to be a fraction higher than the spring on either side ?
    I have a few RR Stock knives and none have blade rub leaving marks, but i do not have a 725. I wonder if all, or most, of the 725's show this degree of rub. Would be interesting to see more 725's posted.
    kj
     
  13. wazu013

    wazu013 Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 14, 2011
    Here's one that has a few bells and whistles.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  14. Pipeman

    Pipeman

    Dec 2, 2004
    The springs are even and flush, that gap is just a darker line in the bone. I have a few GECs that hit the back spring :D I'm not really comparing RRs fit and finish to Case however for the money they are always close IMO and I have handled well over 1000 RRs. My point was really that they come sharper than Case knives and from my comparisons they get sharper. To be totally honest, IF I had a new Case, A new GEC and new RR and NEEDED a sharp knife in an emergency situation, I would always pick the RR. Great entry level knife, great for comparing patterns which of course leads to GEC addiction :D
    Oh, BTW, the rockwell of 58 came both from RR (a smokey mountain guy) and by a number of outside tests. I think there may be comments in this thread from early on,it was the big question at the time. According to Bernard Levine, 440a will rockwell to within one point of 440c with proper heat treat.

    Have a great day

    Best regards

    Robin
     
  15. wazu013

    wazu013 Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 14, 2011
    Here's some comparison pics of a $10 RR scout with some older USA made scouts.
    [​IMG]
    Case Tested era
    [​IMG]

    Case XX era
    [​IMG]
    Kabar
    [​IMG]
    Camillus
    [​IMG]
     
  16. oldmanrunning

    oldmanrunning Basic Member Basic Member

    Apr 22, 2013
    Hi Stareagle, i am waiting for a Case small stockman from the States , so i bought this from H-H to be going on with, as you will see from the photo it is closer in size to the Case medium stockman. It is a bit larger than i was expecting and as a coin pocket knife OK but i prefer a Peanut as i find this RR Stockman has a way of getting wedged in.
    The Case small stockman hopefully should arrive this week, i will post comparison photos then.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. supratentorial

    supratentorial

    Dec 19, 2006
    Thanks Robin. I'm going to reply to both of you at the same time since there's some overlap... and I'm a bit lazy. ;) I was looking at the shadows between the springs. I don't have the knife in hand so it was more of a question than a statement. But in my experience, the Rough Rider knives have gaps and uneven springs, gaps between the handle material and the liners, etc. The blade rub seems to be a common problem on the 725 and the sowbellies. On the 725, I can actually see the sheepfoot blade move if I let the clip blade fall shut. Stock knives and whittlers are always a bit tricky, especially when the blades are crinked. I give Rough Rider points for the lockback, especially on an $8-10 knife. I'm not going to be super critical at that price point. But I think that's why the "quality" gets exaggerated. The faults are there. I could go through this thread and find a lot of faults but it would not be polite... it wouldn't be particularly fun either. Since Robin posted a photo as an example for this discussion, I made a few comments that I normally would not make about someone's new baby. It's a lot more fun to enjoy the knives than to focus on the faults. But I think it's important to keep it all in perspective. I think they're fun knives in lots of interesting patterns but they are inexpensive knives in more ways than just the price. I can change the profile on these knives with a few passes on ceramic stones. To me, that suggests it's pretty soft.
     
  18. wazu013

    wazu013 Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 14, 2011
    What I think the RR's do is give you a chance to buy some discontinued or otherwise expensive patterns to use and beat the crap out of without the cost. I have their half hawk and their scout for that reason.
    [​IMG]
    Red bone Case xx era - RR scout
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 31, 2015
  19. supratentorial

    supratentorial

    Dec 19, 2006
    I agree. They also have quite a few old patterns that are uncommon and some that are not produced by any other company... lockback whittlers and trappers and sowbellies, multi-blades with a LOT of blades, a stockman with a spey blade primary, a stockman with a cap lifter and screwdriver, etc.
     
  20. Dadpool

    Dadpool Gold Member Gold Member

    May 18, 2015
    Neat! I've never seen a Rough Rider with that kind of filework.

     

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