Schrade 152OT Sharpfinger

Codger_64

Moderator
Joined
Oct 8, 2004
Messages
59,496
I see people, collectors and users, frequently lament that the genuine U.S.A. made Schrade Sharpfingers are hard to find and overly expensive if found at all, I tend to disagree for several reasons.

First, if one knows what to look for to identify them, and looks in the right places, there are plenty available in every condition imaginable from relic to lightly used to new in the box.

Second the cost vs. value. If I take the original MSRP of $14 in 1973 and do inflation calculations to today's dollars, that same MSRP would be $82.05 in 2020. The disconnect it seems is when comparing modern import copies sale prices which is apples and oranges. Reversing the MSRP on the copies from today's dollars to 1973, we find a knife that would have sold back then for $4.74.

Third, apparent rarity and availability today. For many years I and others have repeated the information given by former employees of Schrade that the Sharpfinger was the most produced fixed blade made by the company, taking the statement as gospel without any real proof of the claim. So I decided to check the actual reported end of year production figures available, 1973-2002. Thirty years of the thirty two years it was produced.

The survey was complicated and time consuming as the report format changed several times over the years. Often special orders were obscured by product numbers specific to major customers where the pattern itself is not spelled out. Additionally seconds, remainders and reprocessed products aren't specified.

I did my survey in three ten year tranches. 1973 - 1982, 1983 - 1992, 1993 - 2002. Beginning with 1973, the first mention of the 152OT in production reports with 9,533 pieces shipped (Baer called this 'filing the pipeline') the final combined production tally of the 152OT base knife for those thirty years was 3,118,099 knives shipped. This does not count varients such as the scrimshaws, Uncle Henrys or other limited or special editions. Those add another approximate quarter of a million pieces of the pattern.

As the pattern is uncomplicated in construction, resistant to wear and damage under normal use and quite impervious to destruction, a good percentage of those approximate 3 1/2 million knives survive today circulating in and out of the market. Retail prices vary from one venue to the next and even seasonally. So I am reluctant to pin down prices such as one finds in popular price guides. Each buyer has his/her own criteria for determining what is a reasonable price to pay considering all factors.
 

Codger_64

Moderator
Joined
Oct 8, 2004
Messages
59,496
First new Sharpfinger of the new year? If I have this one identified correctly it was issued for Ducks Unlimited in 1994 with 100 pieces produced.


 
Last edited:

Codger_64

Moderator
Joined
Oct 8, 2004
Messages
59,496
This knife handle design was subsequently adapted for several state chapter issues such as this one for Missouri with art added to the pile side and changed blade etch.


 

Codger_64

Moderator
Joined
Oct 8, 2004
Messages
59,496
Another recent Ducks Unlimited Sharpfinger. Wood covers, antique bronze coined duck head shield, DU blade etch, branded sheath. Date currently unknown.


ETA: Identified as from the 2004 Ducks Unlimited Flyway set.

 
Last edited:
Joined
Apr 8, 2013
Messages
673
Another recent Ducks Unlimited Sharpfinger. Wood covers, antique bronze coined duck head shield, DU blade etch, branded sheath. Date currently unknown.



oh wow, a wood handle. don't think I've seen a sharpfinger with wood scales. neat.
 

Codger_64

Moderator
Joined
Oct 8, 2004
Messages
59,496
oh wow, a wood handle. don't think I've seen a sharpfinger with wood scales. neat.
There were several made at different times with different woods. This one appears to be honey stained oak.

I have three or four in birdseye maple. And of course some in light oak. If I have the right order proposal sheet, this one was offered to Ducks Unlimited in a three knife package with a matching LB-7 and an 877UH knife in August of 1991.

And there were 100th anniversary Sharpfingers in Birdseye maple (BEM) in 2004. Of course several other issues in between like the U.S. Tobacco Skoal/Copenhagen outdoors knives of 1995.



Beware of the wood handled knives with small rivets. They were finished in Asia after the plant closed and should not have the collector value of factory finished knives, IMHO. But would still be good users as the blades themselves were finished in the U.S.A. factory except for final edging.
 
Last edited:

Codger_64

Moderator
Joined
Oct 8, 2004
Messages
59,496
The 158OT guthook was introduced in 1988 and also made it's Scrimshaw debut as the 518SC in the HK88 dealer hunting knife display set. This one used Giorgianni art of an eagle in flight and had a "Limited Edition" blade etch. I'll try to find a better photo of the art before this one arrives.



Here is the flyer of that bonus offer from 1988.

 

Codger_64

Moderator
Joined
Oct 8, 2004
Messages
59,496
In my research I found that the eagle artwork stamped on the 1988 HK88 502SC bonus knife was recycled from the 1983 509SC (156OT pattern) Scrimshaw set knife. As you can see, it is much more finely detailed than the pictures above show.

 

Codger_64

Moderator
Joined
Oct 8, 2004
Messages
59,496
Here's a simple custom order blade etch on the standard 152OT knife. It was likely a co-operative sales promotional item for customers. "Complements of Rheem Mfg. And Frederick Trading Co."




Founded in 1934 in Frederick, Maryland, Frederick Trading Co., described as a closely held hardware distributor. In 1998 Memphis-based Orgill, Inc., founded in 1847, executed a letter of intent to purchase the assets including distribution facilities in several states.
Orgill has operations in 27 states, in Canada and more than 50 other foreign countries .

1959 catalog.
 
Joined
May 19, 2008
Messages
7
Hi Codger I hope you are well, at the moment I'm isolating as have coronovirus, so I was looking for interesting posts to follow , this one by far has been my favourite, so much info and so many great looking 152's , thanks for all your hard work writing this up .
 

Codger_64

Moderator
Joined
Oct 8, 2004
Messages
59,496
Hi Codger I hope you are well, at the moment I'm isolating as have coronovirus, so I was looking for interesting posts to follow , this one by far has been my favourite, so much info and so many great looking 152's , thanks for all your hard work writing this up .
I myself have been isolated since October of last year. Except for emergency visits to the local hospital and regular visits by nurses here at home.

I am glad that people are finding my research presented here useful and entertaining. As one might surmise, I have narrowed my collecting and research down to this one pattern and it's two siblings. And yet the variety found is still seemingly endless.

I'm sorry that forum program changes and off site photo hosting services have eliminated many of the images I have posted over the years. I am working on replacing some of them as I can. In addition to updating with new knife variants found. Please do post pictures of your if you can. Even if they are just good faithful users.

And welcome to the forum!
 

Codger_64

Moderator
Joined
Oct 8, 2004
Messages
59,496
Today's arrival, another 152OT made for outfitter L.L. Bean. This one is a catch and release as I will be sending it to a rancher friend in Oklahoma for his use or collection. I already have one or two of them.



The text logo stamped shield is the only custom feature they ordered in 1988. Records show a total of 788 pieces shipped.
 
Joined
May 19, 2008
Messages
7
I myself have been isolated since October of last year. Except for emergency visits to the local hospital and regular visits by nurses here at home.

I am glad that people are finding my research presented here useful and entertaining. As one might surmise, I have narrowed my collecting and research down to this one pattern and it's two siblings. And yet the variety found is still seemingly endless.

I'm sorry that forum program changes and off site photo hosting services have eliminated many of the images I have posted over the years. I am working on replacing some of them as I can. In addition to updating with new knife variants found. Please do post pictures of your if you can. Even if they are just good faithful users.

And welcome to the forum!

Thanks Mike , sadly U.S made knives are hard to get hold of in the uk , especially old ones, but it's great reading these informative posts , thanks for the welcome, I've actually been a member since 2008 but I mainly lurk and gather info lol , sorry to hear about your troubles mate, not been great times for many of us , take care and plz carry on with this great collection.

Regards
Paul (ZED)
 
Joined
Apr 8, 2013
Messages
673
Yes, I appreciate all the information recorded in this forum for future data mining.

I've never understood why on some forums, people get bent out of shape if you resurrect an old thread to add information to it. I always think about who in the future might find and use that information, and not worry so much about whether anyone happens to be interested in it right this second.
 
Joined
Jan 9, 2021
Messages
215
Not a very pretty example but here's mine. One of the scales was broken when I got it so I replaced them with cherry wood scales.

50841807028_18b0b8b1ee_b.jpg
 

Codger_64

Moderator
Joined
Oct 8, 2004
Messages
59,496
Not a very pretty example but here's mine. One of the scales was broken when I got it so I replaced them with cherry wood scales.

50841807028_18b0b8b1ee_b.jpg
Nothing wrong with replacing damaged scales to keep one functional. And it appears that you did a good job on that one! I see that it is a 502SC tang stamp, a Scrimshaw originally. Thanks for showing us yours!

Over the years I have picked up several orphans and absolute relics. Even the worst of them can be salvaged for use with a little effort. The simple design, durable materials and ease of assembly pretty much assured this. A tipped blade, pin cracked or campfire melted cover, heavy weathering from years on the ground or in the creek. A production of more than 3 1/2 million knives over thirty years assures that there will still be a good supply into the future for those who look for one.

Here is one of my "relic" Sharpfingers. Someone found this one after it being dropped outdoors by the owner, lost for quite some time apparently. I have no plans to repair it but it wouldn't take much more than dressing the edge to make it fully field functional again.

 
Last edited:
Joined
May 19, 2008
Messages
7
Nothing wrong with replacing damaged scales to keep one functional. And it appears that you did a good job on that one! I see that it is a 502SC tang stamp, a Scrimshaw originally. Thanks for showing us yours!

Over the years I have picked up several orphans and absolute relics. Even the worst of them can be salvaged for use with a little effort. The simple design, durable materials and ease of assembly pretty much assured this. A tipped blade, pin cracked or campfire melted cover, heavy weathering from years on the ground or in the creek. A production of more than 3 1/2 million knives over thirty years assures that there will still be a good supply into the future for those who look for one.

Here is one of my "relic" Sharpfingers. Someone found this one after it being dropped outdoors by the owner, lost for quite some time apparently. I have no plans to repair it but it wouldn't take much more than dressing the edge to make it fully field functional again.

I love how faded the scales are on this one Mike .
 

Codger_64

Moderator
Joined
Oct 8, 2004
Messages
59,496
Here is one of the few I have ever seen with broken covers.



Here is one I just found. I've never seen cracks like this one before. Quite odd I do say!

 
Last edited:
Native XF ad, Below bottom BC
Top