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How To Shapton Pro #320 Splash-n-Go ... clean it off or just add more water?

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by At1Rest, Jul 9, 2019.

  1. At1Rest

    At1Rest

    88
    Apr 11, 2019
    Hi there,
    I'm just getting started with a new Shapton Pro 320 grit stone.
    Last night when reprofiling the main blade of a Bear MGC midsize stockman I was getting a fairly thick build up of ?!?!? ... what to call it ... mud? slurry? ... and wanted to ask about it.

    It seemed like a good idea to spray it clean occasionally so that's what I was doing.
    Maybe it would be better to just add some water without totally cleaning it off?

    How do you do it?

    Thanks!
     
  2. sickpuppy1

    sickpuppy1 Basic Member Basic Member

    406
    Sep 27, 2018
    That slurry can scratch the surface your not trying to sharpen, so rinse it off and resume with a clean stone
     
    At1Rest likes this.
  3. At1Rest

    At1Rest

    88
    Apr 11, 2019
    ahhh ... never thought of that.

    Thank you!
     
  4. eKretz

    eKretz

    930
    Aug 30, 2009
    I always remove it also. In addition to the above it seems to slow down cutting considerably if allowed to build up too much.
     
    At1Rest likes this.
  5. At1Rest

    At1Rest

    88
    Apr 11, 2019
    Thanks eKretz
     
  6. Mr.Wizard

    Mr.Wizard

    351
    Feb 28, 2015
    Mud can either slow down or speed up grinding; three body abrasion (loose particles) is slower, but the mud also continually refreshes the surface of the stone, and if the stone otherwise tends to glaze or clog this can actually keep it cutting faster.
     
    willc likes this.
  7. At1Rest

    At1Rest

    88
    Apr 11, 2019
    Mr. Wizard - Thanks for the input.
    You're probably speaking in general terms and possibly about other stones?

    Glazing or clogging, so far, seems impossible with this 320 grit Shapton pro.
    I've got an old Windex spray bottle of water and it cleans off really quick.
    Just a couple of squirts while angling it one edge down into the bucket on the floor and it's back to looking fresh.
     
  8. Mr.Wizard

    Mr.Wizard

    351
    Feb 28, 2015
    @At1Rest Yes, generically. I have never used a Shapton stone.
     
    At1Rest likes this.
  9. Wowbagger

    Wowbagger Basic Member Basic Member

    Sep 20, 2015
    A few thoughts (keeping in mind I am ALL ABOUT my nice Shapton Pro bench stones) :
    Burrfection found the Shapton Glass 320 to be vastly superior to the Pro stone.


    I think for reprofiling I would go much more coarse such as the Shapton Pro 120 (which Ricky is super enthusiastic about . . . as am I).

    Yes in any case wash the heck out of them stones when trying to take off significant amounts of metal. I wash mine under the running kitchen faucet while I am sharpening . . . even scrubbing them with the rust erasers, a nagura stone or clean the stone by "flattening" / conditioning on a diamond plate.
     
    At1Rest likes this.
  10. eKretz

    eKretz

    930
    Aug 30, 2009
    Yes, slurry is composed of grit and binder particles that have come loose from the stone. I actually read the original question as asking about swarf, or steel particles removed from the item being sharpened. Those tend to clog the hone and slow it down. I must have been in a hurry.

    It is absolutely correct that loose grit particles - or slurry, or mud if you will - normally speeds up the cutting but also leaves a worse finish and coarser edge. It is rare in my experience that cutting speed actually slows with a slurry, though it does happen under certain circumstances.
     
    At1Rest likes this.
  11. At1Rest

    At1Rest

    88
    Apr 11, 2019
    Thanks for the input Wowbanger.
    I did see that video before I bought the pro, Ricky is really cool, but I found a good deal on the pro so I went with that.
    My first coarse stone purchase was an Edge Pro 220 Grit and I just wanted something close to that and much wider and slightly less coarse so that was an other reason.
    I did most of the material removal on that stockman blade I mentioned above with an 8" Nicholson single cut file so that went pretty fast.

    I also have a belt sander, old school, horizontal 4" x 36" belts, and I yesterday I did a lot of material removal with that loaded with a 220 grit belt
    on a Leatherman Wave+ serrated blade, end goal to make it kind of a lambs foot.
    I got it down to where it needed to be and even started the bevels, but got to the point where I was feeling I didn't have enough control so I stopped and now the next step will be the Shapton 320.

    The Shapton 320 is probably a long way from needing to be flattened, but I did flatten the Edge Pro 220 a few weeks ago on an 18" ceramic tile with SiC powder and that worked great.
    I'll remember the diamond plate if it ever gets dished.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2019
  12. At1Rest

    At1Rest

    88
    Apr 11, 2019
    Well, you might be right about it being "swarf" that I was seeing.
    I've not enough experience to know exactly what it was.
    The steel of that stockman isn't really tough stuff so I don't imagine that it was beating up the stone very much.
    Light grey in color when on the stone and darker grey/black when washed off into the bucket.

    End result of this thread is "yes, wash it off" so thank you!
     
  13. At1Rest

    At1Rest

    88
    Apr 11, 2019
    Thanks for the tip on the #120.
    I got one and I like it a lot.
     

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