Photos Smith and Wesson SW-830 military model Performance R.O.C-440 boot knife

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Mar 29, 2021
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Hey guys I have a Smith and Wesson SW-830 military model Performance R.O.C-440 boot knife made in the USA with the original box and sheath, but that's all I know about it. Won it in an auction for just little bit and would like to know anything about it. It's like nib the sheath even looks new and is marked made in the USA
 

CWL

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The baby smatchett! If you were hoping for it being a treasure, it isn't. Go ahead and abuse it because it isn't going to go up in value.
 
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Congratulations for winning the auction. It seems like you know the basics, what else are you wanting to find out? o_O
Thank you! I am wondering about the logo on the blade. It has the Smith and Wesson logo with Performance and R.O.C-440. What does this mean? It also has Smith and Wesson engraved on the other side.. The box reads SW-830 military model and the sheath has the Smith and Wesson logos that made in the USA. Do you have any idea when it was manufactured, and it's worth? It's NOS
 
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pretty sweet vintage 90's
has sort of an applegate look to it.
its a very capable wide wound channel tool
perhaps why it was marketed as the military model ?
oh, and btw as since the handle is symetrical,
that small hole acts as a finger sensory guide for indicating to the user the side which bares a knife's razor edge for orientation under complete conditions of steaithy darkness.
another was the police
think there was also a bowie with a different handle.
 
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Centermass

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First and foremost, you should refer to the Forum rules which prohibit soliciting knife values if you are a non-paying member.

That said, while photos would help a lot, I’m inclined to believe your knife is not super valuable in cash terms. ROC usually refers to Republic of China, most likely the country of manufacture. And 440 is gonna be the blade steel. 440 series stainless, probably 440A, a common material used in Chinese manufactured, generally lower quality knives (at least by modern standards). Just because Smith and Wesson is an American company, does not mean all their licensed products are American made. Many, many affordable, “tactical” style Smith and Wesson knives were imported under license by Taylor Corp and other companies but made in China.
 

K.O.D.

Sanity Not Included
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First and foremost, you should refer to the Forum rules which prohibit soliciting knife values if you are a non-paying member.

That said, while photos would help a lot, I’m inclined to believe your knife is not super valuable in cash terms. ROC usually refers to Republic of China, most likely the country of manufacture. And 440 is gonna be the blade steel. 440 series stainless, probably 440A, a common material used in Chinese manufactured, generally lower quality knives (at least by modern standards). Just because Smith and Wesson is an American company, does not mean all their licensed products are American made. Many, many affordable, “tactical” style Smith and Wesson knives were imported under license by Taylor Corp and other companies but made in China.

Just to clarify, Republic of China is Taiwan. Still, S&W knives are generally not much to write home about but are good enough for most people's tasks. Use it, don't expect it to be a collector item.
 
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The first production runs of this model (mid 1990s) had USA written on the blade. The latest models were made in China and have just the words "Smith & Wesson" on the ricasso. I was not aware until now but it appears that prior to China production, they were made in Taiwan (R.O.C.). The 440 obviously is the steel. This logo appears on SW folders as well. The sheaths that shipped with the ROC models were made in USA and clearly marked. Smith & Wesson back in the 80s offered some pretty decent knives, some they had made in Seki. However, after the brand name was sold to Taylor, S&W knife products went the way of some other big names.
Made in USA:
7yb3xu.jpg

Made in ROC (Taiwan)
V6M4ht.jpg

NX4fGT.jpg

Made in China:
OhFeah.jpg
 
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Mar 29, 2021
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I think just the sheath was made in the USA and knife in China.
No I really think this is a Performance Center knife with possibly Chinese 440 steel. It is the only one I've ever seen with this logo. The ones that are made in China say either China or made in China with no Smith and Wesson logo that says Performance as in Performance Center. This actually reads made in the USA for the Military on the solid blue and white box. It also reads on a sticker on the box Military model, this knife is Razor honed from the factory be careful. They're not kidding either. It's extremely sharp
 

CWL

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Dude, I hope you're trolling.
SW Performance Center tunes guns that come from their own factory, they don't outright manufacture anything themselves, let alone knives. I know because I have a 1980's 586 tuned by them.
Your knife came from Taiwan, hence the "R.O.C." and is never going to be worth more than what you paid for it. It certainly wasn't a military issue item.
 
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Actually the Performance center does manufacture and handmake many firearms and knives. They even hand fit them. I know because I took an extensive tour.
 
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I know 5his model wasn't personally issued because it's new old stock, but I never said it was issued to the military just that it reads military model on the box
 
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I really don't care what it's worth. I saw regular made in China SW-830's on Ebay go for anywhere from $95 to $135. I have several Blackie Collins designed Survival and bowie knives from the mid seventies with the box, paperwork, and sheath that are the more valuable knives and I'm not looking to sale these either. I just thought it was interesting, because it's the only one I've been able to find that appears to have the Performance Center logo on the blade, doesn't specifically say China on it, it does read made in USA and is the military model, that's all. I haven't run across another one and I have really been looking. It is perfectly balanced for throwing too. It's just a really nice knife, and I am trying to find out more about it, such as the date of manufacture
 

unwisefool

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I really don't care what it's worth. I saw regular made in China SW-830's on Ebay go for anywhere from $95 to $135. I have several Blackie Collins designed Survival and bowie knives from the mid seventies with the box, paperwork, and sheath that are the more valuable knives and I'm not looking to sale these either. I just thought it was interesting, because it's the only one I've been able to find that appears to have the Performance Center logo on the blade, doesn't specifically say China on it, it does read made in USA and is the military model, that's all. I haven't run across another one and I have really been looking. It is perfectly balanced for throwing too. It's just a really nice knife, and I am trying to find out more about it, such as the date of manufacture
Did you see the pictures posted above by Ken that seem to show the same branding that you are describing? ROC means it was made in Taiwan, not in the USA or at the Performance Center. It literally says on the blade where it was made. It doesn't have "China" printed on it because it says ROC.
 
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These were made from the 90's through the early 2000's. They say military because the were playing off the success of the Boker A/F knives that came before it, and were having success with military orders. The 820 was the Police model, it was a boot knife with an M-3 style spear point. The double edged smatchet was the 830 Military model. Other knives had similar names, but that's all they were, trade names.

I'm not sure if they changed steels, but the early ones were 440c, which was a top steel back then. Depending on retailer, they were $30-40 after discount usually.

They were good knives, they came out right after Taylor bought the brand, and was trying to compete with Schrade or Camillus rather than being a strictly budget brand. That didn't work out, and most of the line cheapened out after.

Edit - The earliest it could be is 97/98. These had the simple blue and white boxes.
 
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Joined
Mar 29, 2021
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Oh for some reason I didn't get notified of the post with pictures and explanations, or your post! Thank you so much for letting me know!
 
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Mar 29, 2021
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Did you see the pictures posted above by Ken that seem to show the same branding that you are describing? ROC means it was made in Taiwan, not in the USA or at the Performance Center. It literally says on the blade where it was made. It doesn't have "China" printed on it because it says ROC.
No I didn't get notified of it at all. But thank you Ken! Thank you don't letting me know!
 
Joined
Mar 29, 2021
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The first production runs of this model (mid 1990s) had USA written on the blade. The latest models were made in China and have just the words "Smith & Wesson" on the ricasso. I was not aware until now but it appears that prior to China production, they were made in Taiwan (R.O.C.). The 440 obviously is the steel. This logo appears on SW folders as well. The sheaths that shipped with the ROC models were made in USA and clearly marked. Smith & Wesson back in the 80s offered some pretty decent knives, some they had made in Seki. However, after the brand name was sold to Taylor, S&W knife products went the way of some other big names.
Made in USA:
7yb3xu.jpg

Made in ROC (Taiwan)
V6M4ht.jpg

NX4fGT.jpg

Made in China:
OhFeah.jpg
Thank you for the post, pictures, and information! I really appreciate it!
 
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