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What Did You Sharpen Today?

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by marbat, Aug 21, 2015.

  1. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    740
    Mar 2, 2013
    I like those old slicks and even the one, Square_peg, which someone has tried their best to modify.
    The bark spud I'm using, (an old Christmas tree lives on in its handle) does have certain parallels, but also obvious deviations.
    [​IMG]
     
    jake pogg, Trailsawyer and Agent_H like this.
  2. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    There is another class of chisels related to slicks but designed to be hammered hard. These are solid steel framing chisels. They share this property with slicks...

    Struck with a drilling hammer or similar these chisels cut very fast. I use them for building trail structures, puncheon bridges and the like.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The 1-1/4" slick is a Craftsman. The heavy 2" slick is one I forged out of an old crowbar. The day I made it I had been working on a puncheon bridge I realized I needed a good heavy all steel slick. I forged it out quick and dirty and gave it a heat treat. It has served me well for the past 6 years.
     
  3. A17

    A17

    232
    Jan 9, 2018
    Since we're on the subject of these, can someone ID this one? I got it with 72 other tools (some of them being rare) for free. I asked if the owner wanted to sell a toolbox full of rusty tools that I noticed sitting near a garbage can. A couple days later, I got told "I can't accept any money for those rusty old tools, just take them". Notice the ˜ shape of the slick. Kinda odd, isn't it? You can see the lamination line on the slick's edge. The slick is partially buried by the front of the jack plane in the upper left hand corner of the mass photo. Its amazing what you can get for free if you offer to pay. So far I've gotten 73 cabinetry and timber framing tools, 5 axe heads + a machete and a bucket full of tools, and finally, access to a box of hammer heads and a barrel that has some nos handles in it. Ok, I'm done rambling.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Square_peg likes this.
  4. Brian Rust

    Brian Rust

    433
    Nov 14, 2017
    Wow what a score! That spoke shave and scraper are awesome!!! Good for you!! And a scraper plane and a router plane!! Gosh. If you want some handles made let me know!
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2018
  5. Brian Rust

    Brian Rust

    433
    Nov 14, 2017
    [​IMG]

    This thread motivated me to turn a new handle for this chisel. It’s two inches. Slick or just 2” chisel? It has a small chip on the edge and I need to clean it up. I’m not sure if my skill level is there yet.... I have a sharpening guide but idk if that would work. Do I just keep the same angle and take it back past the chip? Seems like that would be a big undertaking.

    The handle did not turn out like I wanted though. I had 10” piece of oak and thought it was enough but I will have to make another one.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2018
    junkenstien, Square_peg and garry3 like this.
  6. garry3

    garry3

    Sep 11, 2012
    That last picture there looks like some James Swan chisels I have seen.
     
  7. jake pogg

    jake pogg

    645
    Dec 20, 2015
    Brian,for what it's worth,here's what i do:
    (admittedly "quick&dirty"...).
    Keeping the same angle,advance the bevel into the bench-grinder wheel(slow-speed one if available,or a roller of up-ended belt-sander,and whatever it is-cool frequently not letting it get so hot as your fingers holding it get uncomfortable,or it boiling droplets of coolant water on blade).
    Make sure it feeds very SQUARE(clamp a guide onto whatever if in doubt of your ability to do so).
    You don't have to take that(in essence a hollow-grind)clear to the very edge.Stop a 1/16" short.
    What that'll do is give you a clear,easily felt 2-point reference(edge and the opposite end of the bevel),and also save time and your abrasives,removing the center part of the bevel that causes the tool to rock on the abrasive.
    Now you can carry on and take the chip out on,say,400 or even less if you prefer,and then go up in grit to whatever you'd be happy with.
    Stones,if you got'em,And have the capacity to dress them flat,or simply sandpaper contact-glued to a straight surface of your choice.

    Cool handle,i like that.From your photo is hard to say what type of chisel it is,or how you mean to use it.(actually looks like a millwright chisel,not that it matters).
    But if this is to be driven with a mallet,you'd probably want a cylindical part milled on the last inch or so of the end,and a ferrule(section of a copper pipe et c.)stuck on there.
     
    Trailsawyer and garry3 like this.
  8. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    ^^^
    Very good advice! That's an easy way to put a good sharp edge on an old chisel.
     
  9. Brian Rust

    Brian Rust

    433
    Nov 14, 2017
    That’s for the jake I appreciate it. And it is a KeenKutter. It had a very short oval shaped handle with a iron ferrule on it. It just didn’t look proportioned correct at all. And it was dry rotted basically. I will most likely make a longer handle and use a ferrule with it.
     
  10. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Or alternately, carve a hardwood handle for it plus a couple of heavy crude softer wood mallets/mauls. Beat the tar out of a throw-away maul and grab the next one. Green wood is fine for this purpose.

    A wooden maul need not be this refined.
    [​IMG]
     
  11. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    740
    Mar 2, 2013
    It's a great thread when it motivates its readers to action, that's all I can say. Well, it's not really all I can say. Without pretending to know a thing about it, I guess the chisel was made with some intention, maybe lost now, or difficult to track down - except for Steve Tall - but some clues may exits if we look. The socket is striking to me, so small in proportion and with that knuckle or reinforcement at the opening, in a way a contradiction but maybe not. If the volume of the socket is reduced like that, the lateral strength on the handle that gets stuck in it is also cut down. We can say this is not a chisel made for prying, or much anyway. The thickening at the rim could be a way to increase the bearing surface and absorb direct blows so One conclusion could be, adding on the description of the original handle as ferruled and short, that it is primarily for chopping, the internal contradiction being that chopping is associated most of the time with prying. I don't know it but rather than being the chisel of the framing carpenter working and jointing timbers I guess this ones place is at the bench of the finish carpenter, so good for window frames, doors and jambs etc... relatively light work but on a large format. Still I'm bothered by this rim reinforcement because the notion of a bearing surface there really does not go well at all with a socket mounting. Always, and integral to the socket mounting is a space of free movement where the tung of the handle exits the socket to accommodate re-wedging of the handle as it shrinks - and expands. (Implied in this is that the tung will not bottom out at the end of its socket as the wood dries out, contracts and the handle re-seats tight a bit further down.)
    With a handle like that, as it now stands, it looks like a pairing tool, the narrowing through the middle providing some resistance as it gets pushed forward, round at the end for a comfortable grip, really, just the opposite of what you could expect on a tool for chopping where, for a good grip the handle would swell through the middle a bit to fill the palm of the holder's hand and then be reinforced at the top to reduce fraying and a split.
    I would like to show my framing chisel, the design I think is so ideal, the span of my grip covering the self-seating wood section and more, the end sturdy to handle the heavy blows from my hammer. Really, such a logical configuration and example of how form follows function, serving both in the end.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    Mar 31, 2016
    hand crank grinder is my choice but ultimately it's whacha got on hand
     
    Brian Rust and Ernest DuBois like this.
  13. Steve Tall

    Steve Tall

    Aug 28, 2010
    These catalog pages show James Swan slicks and chisels. The slicks range from 2-1/2 to 4 inches, while the "socket framing chisels" include sizes from 2 to 3 inches. The "beveled back" slicks (10" blade length) are said to be for heavy work, while the "oval back" slicks (9" blade length) are for light work. The blade length for the socket framing chisels is 8", and these likewise have the option of bevel back or oval back.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2018
    Agent_H, crbnSteeladdict and garry3 like this.
  14. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    740
    Mar 2, 2013
    Look at the neat closure between socket and grip on these chisels. Oh well, it's easy to fix.
    But I was thinking if there was a catalogue with the very chisel Brian Rust has got his hands on it might lay out a reason, at least provide a rational, justified or not, for the thickness at the socket's rim.
     
  15. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Perhaps Brian's chisel is a multi-purpose tool designed to be either pushed by hand with a handle or hammered with a wooden mallet on the thickened lip.
     
  16. rjdankert

    rjdankert Basic Member Basic Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    Recently reprofiled this plane iron. I do the same with chisels.

    note: this is my way not THE way. ;)


    Before

    [​IMG]


    use a square, scribe a line and grind to lhe line

    [​IMG]


    Set the angle

    [​IMG]


    Grind the bevel

    [​IMG]


    Ready to hone

    [​IMG]



    Bob
     
  17. Brian Rust

    Brian Rust

    433
    Nov 14, 2017
    Thanks for the pictures bob! This is very similar to some other advice given to me!
     
  18. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    [​IMG]
    Jersette
    by Agent Hierarchy, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Jersette
    by Agent Hierarchy, on Flickr

    [​IMG]
    Jersette
    by Agent Hierarchy, on Flickr

    just files, @25 degrees about .5" back, rounded. It's worn enough that it doesn't have a fan in the center to have that "look". It's actually slightly thinner in the center at and behind the grind. Trying to only take where it's needed. To get an even edge it wanted a tad more the ends - I think it's an insert bit. :)
     
  19. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Love it!
    You let the shape of the cheeks determine the shape of the grind - just as you should.
     
    Agent_H likes this.
  20. phantomknives

    phantomknives

    Mar 31, 2016
    [​IMG]
    haven't been paying much attention to the spiller so i thought i'd give it a fair shake. brushed it up, reprofiled it and then filed it

    i know the surface finish isnt the best
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2018
    Agent_H, Miller '72, 300Six and 2 others like this.

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