What stone do you recommend?

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by arijer, Oct 6, 2014.

  1. arijer

    arijer

    745
    Jul 13, 2009
    Hi everyone

    I have a hopefully simple (doubt it :) lol) question....

    I have now multiple knives in the following steels
    S30V
    S35V
    S90V
    S110V
    Elmax
    CTS-XHP
    M390
    And I am really struggling with them.

    I have a Norton dual grit stone 220/1000. Also Fallkniven DC4 ceramic and a nice strop. My 1095, O1 and A2 blades do fine on it. On my other steels I can't make a dent.

    So I am looking at getting new stone set. What brand would you recommend that can affect these steels?

    Bester
    Chosera
    Nawanina
    Sigma Power Select ii
    Shapton Pro

    I was thinking of a simple set...
    100-200 grit
    400 grit
    1000 grit
    3000-5000 grit

    Four stones not more for now. I am not a that good yet... Far from it lol

    So recommendation? Why?

    Thank you

    Gabriel
     
  2. buckman110

    buckman110

    777
    Aug 31, 2014
    You have a good set up now. Thoes are some tougher steels to sharpen bud. I'd take a lil extra time with them.
     
  3. Sadden

    Sadden

    795
    Dec 19, 2011
    Shapton Pro - 220 , 1500 , 5000
    Nubatama - 150 , 1k speckled , 2k speckled , 4k (the one jason has)

    Add a roo or nanocloth strop with 1u Diamond/CBN. And add an Atoma 140 to the pile for flattening and repairs.
     
  4. Gone2Fish

    Gone2Fish

    28
    Aug 17, 2013
    Yeah, it's insane difference compared to my regular carbon steels
    Even CPM M4 and 3V are easier then these stainless lol
     
  5. buckman110

    buckman110

    777
    Aug 31, 2014
    There all the same to me, I can sharpen just about anything with ease.
     
  6. Jason B.

    Jason B. KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 13, 2007
    To start I would recommend a diamond plate such as the Atoma 140. It will make short work of setting bevels which is typically the time consuming part of sharpening high wear steels. It's also great for lapping waterstones.

    For stones, the Shapton pro work a bit better on high wear steels but I think the glass stone might be the better choice here. I have not used them myself but they are formulated for more modern steels and considering what you have it's a obvious choice.

    The Shapton glass 500 and 2000 with the above atoma would be my recommendation.
     
  7. Gone2Fish

    Gone2Fish

    28
    Aug 17, 2013
    Thank you👍
     
  8. jayjaytuner

    jayjaytuner

    202
    Jun 27, 2008
    been using choseras for a while and they been working great for me.

    atoma 140 for flattening.
    400x
    800x
    2000x
    3000x
    dlt double sided strop bark river black and white compound
     
  9. buckman110

    buckman110

    777
    Aug 31, 2014
    If you can find one reasonable, a black Arkansas stone can produce an incredible edge with the proper technique :eek:
     
  10. Jason B.

    Jason B. KnifeMaker / Craftsman / Service Provider Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Jun 13, 2007
    It would not be the best of choices for such wear resistant steels.
     
  11. buckman110

    buckman110

    777
    Aug 31, 2014
    I disagree, I finish everything from cpm m90 cpm m4 s30v s110v and tons of other steels. Even bucks old 440c. That everyone claims it's to hard to sharpen. Arkansas stones cut slow witch = patients. And don't wear out like diamond stones.
     
  12. redsquid2

    redsquid2 Добрая Росомаха Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider

    Aug 31, 2011
    Dmt makes these small plates that i love. about 1"X2". very light, and they double as a key ring. i have the fine and extra fine. i also have the dmt "aligner" plates: similarly constructed, but about 4" long. i have three of these: extra course, course, and fine. I can get my edges to pop hair with the dmt fine, so that's all i need. i don't plan on shaving or performing surgery with my knives. sometimes i use the extra fine, then a strop, just to experiment. i never heard of a diamond stone wearing out.
     
  13. Alberta Ed

    Alberta Ed

    Jun 29, 1999
    Diamond hones outperform natural and manufactured 'stones' when it comes to high carbide steels. I use DMTs for 99% of my sharpening, including high carbon steels. Once in a while, when I'm feeling nostalgic, I dig out a massive Black Arkansas bench stone inherited from a great-uncle, as it puts a beautiful finishing edge on high carbon blades, but otherwise it's the DMTs.
     
  14. HuntBomb

    HuntBomb

    Sep 18, 2009
    For the $, I would go with DMT C-F-XF-XXF
    But I have heard good things about Sharpton.
    And I love my Translucent Arkie from Dan's whetstone company too, even if it does require a little more patience.
    I don't care for the added maintenance of water stones. DMT spoiled me long ago.
     
  15. buckman110

    buckman110

    777
    Aug 31, 2014
    I've got like 8 diamond stones from dmt and Smith's. There shot, all the grit is gone they wear out very quickly. And as far as diamond "outperforming" natural stones No they out cut or I should say cut faster than Arkansas stones. I've got some Norton stones that will out cut a dmt any day of the week. Arkansas stones polish as they remove material. There highly sought after for a reason. If one would look under magnification, one would see the difference.
     

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