1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

  2. Click here to enter the drawing for your chance to win a Kizer Sheepdog & Ka-Bar Dozier Folding Hunter, , Bladeforums.com swag or memberships!

    Be sure to read the rules before entering, then help us decide next week's giveaway by hitting the poll in that thread! Entries close at midnight, Saturday August 10!

    Once the entries close, we'll live stream the drawing on Sunday, July 28 at 5PM Eastern. Tune in to our YouTube channel TheRealBladeForums for a chance to win bonus prizes!

    Questions? Comments? Post in the discussion thread here

What wood is it really?

Discussion in 'Buck Knives' started by GPyro, May 31, 2019.

  1. sassafrassdogs3

    sassafrassdogs3 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 21, 2016
    Not a FG...Too Bad, I'd buy a couple of them...I have the Real Ebony 101 also...
     
    jbmonkey likes this.
  2. Lesknife

    Lesknife Platinum Member Platinum Member

    317
    Mar 31, 2018
    I have held off buying because of a lack of descriptive material choices or when a mix of different materials have been used in a release. Usually I will research first but have sent an email request for information from various vendors as well as Buck and that usually settles it.

    There are some vendors that maybe aren’t aware of the difference or concerned about it because of the warranty but for a decerning individual it does matter. I do prefer diamondwood because it is resistant to water and other liquid and tougher but wouldn’t pass on a natural wood handle for a dress knife but for a working knife I want a more resilient material. I’m sure it’s not intentional or trying to mislead and probably clerical when it’s left out of the description specs but I appreciate an accurate description and when they correct a mistake.

    The worst part about the matter is that uninformed people who think it’s a cheap or imitation wood will spread their views to others who don’t know the difference. I have had to correct a few people about it and still some won’t accept that it isn’t a cheap or fake wood. Lol.
     
  3. Hickory n steel

    Hickory n steel Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 11, 2016
    Talk about water resistant.
    If you know who aquachigger is on YouTube, he's found a number of 110's during his " river treasure " dives and the diamondwood always looked great after he washed the knife off.
    A few of them had obviously been in the river a while.
     
  4. GPyro

    GPyro Gold Member Gold Member

    162
    Apr 18, 2019
    X
    Edit.
    Sorry, I was looking for a post here that was on another thread.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2019
  5. AntDog

    AntDog Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 3, 2001
    I’d second this in a big way. I’d buy one. I’m loving my real ebony 110 FG.
     
    MolokaiRider and jbmonkey like this.
  6. jbmonkey

    jbmonkey Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Jun 9, 2011
    :thumbsup:

    yours is a beauty. real nice example.
     
    AntDog likes this.
  7. eveled

    eveled Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 11, 2016
    Diamond wood is a premium handle material. The only valid complaint about it IMHO is when it is advertised in a way that makes it seem like it is a specific wood.
     
    MolokaiRider and redcanoe like this.
  8. AntDog

    AntDog Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 3, 2001
    I appreciate it, but I can’t take any credit for that. Mike hand picked that one for me. It’s one of the nicest 110s I’ve ever handled.
     
    jbmonkey likes this.
  9. MolokaiRider

    MolokaiRider Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 13, 2017
    Cocobolo. Posted this after it came in on a different thread.

    There’s just something about a 110 and 112.

    C4E37D36-AE19-4BBD-876E-F5DED3C9AAA9.jpeg
     
    JD Bear, Brhowser87, jbmonkey and 5 others like this.
  10. Lesknife

    Lesknife Platinum Member Platinum Member

    317
    Mar 31, 2018
    A couple questions for you guys that know wood materials.

    Is the solid wood ebony and other types of hardwood stabilized or open grain?

    And is it necessary for dense hardwoods or even a feasible way to accomplish a resin saturation to fully close the grain?

    I ask because I know the laminates such as diamond wood has been thoroughly stabilized with resins and therefore are much more durable and resistant to the elements. I’ve heard and read about stabilized solid or non-laminated hardwoods but that was many years ago.
    Thanks in advance for your feedback.
     
  11. st8yd

    st8yd Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 6, 2009
    I dont think the Bucks ebony is stabilized.
    But i think it would be most durable for the majority of other woods to be stabilized.
     
    Lesknife likes this.

Share This Page