Recommendation? Which wax for removable pins during glue up?

CasePeanut

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I’ve heard about using “floor wax” to make removable pins during glue up.

I don’t have any floor wax at home, but I think I have some turtle wax. I may have some paste wax too.

Any suggestions on brands or products that work well to resist epoxy?
 
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I don t use anything , personally . I just make sure there is no epoxy in the pin hole and i use longer pins for that .Even if some pin get glued ....a light hammer blow is all it need to get it out .
 
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I’ve heard about using “floor wax” to make removable pins during glue up.

I don’t have any floor wax at home, but I think I have some turtle wax. I may have some paste wax too.

Any suggestions on brands or products that work well to resist epoxy?
“Wax to make removable pins during glue up” ?????? Your question doesn’t quite make sense to me? If you want a wax to resist epoxy during glue up. The paste wax or whatever the thickest one you have will do what you want instead of floor wax. For the most part, waxes are waxes.
 
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“Wax to make removable pins during glue up” ?????? Your question doesn’t quite make sense to me? If you want a wax to resist epoxy during glue up. The paste wax or whatever the thickest one you have will do what you want instead of floor wax.
I call them temporary pins ..... after scale are glued/finished shape/ and epoxy set I remove them . Then i cut new pins on right length ...........and peened them :thumbsup:
 
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Why do you need to remove one set of pins, insert other pins, and then peen?
 

Cushing H.

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I do it all the time. I use “butchers wax” ... which is really a finishing wax for furniture ... available at Home Depot or hardware stores.
 

Cushing H.

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Why do you need to remove one set of pins, insert other pins, and then peen?
Three reasons. It is much easier to shape the handle (without overheating) without the metal pins in place, especially if using mosaic pins. Also, if you want to peen, you can not do that if you have ground down an already inserted pin while shaping the handle, so that there is no pin protruding, or the hole has not been reamed to accommodate the expanding peened pin.

glue up, remove waxed pin, shape handle, ream out hole, glue in permanent pin, then peen and sand flat
 
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Why do you need to remove one set of pins, insert other pins, and then peen?
Because I don t know what I m talking about , sometimes :DAnyway , I use two set of pins ...one set to finish scale/handle without glue , which mean that pins are grinded and flush with scale .So when i glue handle i use real size pin so i can peen them . But sometimes i glue scale and finish them with pins on and then get out pins and insert new one so i can peen them ......so first post make sense ;)
 
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I don't know if this helps but I go about it a little differently. I use wooden dowels (before glue) to hold the handle in place while shaping, remove them, put in the final pins, and glue everything. then I just have some light finishing to remove the excess glue. I use the same method for shaping removable scales. you just have to find dowel rod that fits very tightly.
 

Cushing H.

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I don't know if this helps but I go about it a little differently. I use wooden dowels (before glue) to hold the handle in place while shaping, remove them, put in the final pins, and glue everything. then I just have some light finishing to remove the excess glue. I use the same method for shaping removable scales. you just have to find dowel rod that fits very tightly.
I have used dowels also, especially for corbys. It’s just easier to get the right size with pins. I have several pins of each size I use that I use over and over...
 

Richard338

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I did some push daggers a couple years ago.
I used temporary pins during glue up.
I wiped them with vaseline, but also made them generously long and put a 90 degree bend in them. I don't know how much of that was necessary, but they came out smoothly. Then I put in decorative pins peened on both sides.
 
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Yeah I’ve used wax before, carnauba I think, and then I just started removing it before epoxy sets. Remove, clean off, and reinstall a few times over the first couple hours with g flex and that’s usually it. I do this because I think handles are much easier to shape without the blade in place so I get it almost finished then glue in the blade and just do a little hand finishing after that. Also the way to go if you want to peen or have domed pins.
 

Hengelo_77

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I use ren-wax because I have it on my bench.
Rubbing the pin on a candle should wax it enough I think.
I also bend the end so I can twist it loose.
 

Bill DeShivs

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Grease, car wax, petroleum jelly-most anything viscous and slick will work.
 

CasePeanut

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Thanks everyone. I found the paste wax so I’ll give it a try for removable pins
 
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