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Blade Mod. Would You?

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by Eli Chaps, Oct 3, 2019.

  1. Eli Chaps

    Eli Chaps Basic Member Basic Member

    Apr 20, 2018
    So I bought this Dexter Russell "cleaver" (SKU 08030) as a cheap way to see if I liked the nakiri-like shape with the full intention of if I did, then promptly buying a more expensive and more authentic version. I also bought it to experiment with thinning a blade. Well, I freaking love this knife and have never felt the need to "upgrade".

    Second one down.
    [​IMG]

    But I've been thinking about cutting the end of the blade to make more of a bunka style and give me a pointed tip. I was thinking coming off the tip and cutting back toward the handle and something like 20 degrees. Nothing radical but leaned back enough to make pointed tip.

    The knife does not have distal taper and I would put the around 2mm. For comparison, here it is next to My Yaxell at 2.5mm:
    [​IMG]

    And the tips:
    [​IMG]

    My primary concern is removing material removes support above the tip and becomes weak.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    So would you do it? I'd do most of the work by hand but it isn't metal work that I'm asking about, but the effect on the knife.

    Appreciate your inputs. :)
     
  2. fishface5

    fishface5

    Feb 3, 2001
    Well the pointer the tip, the weaker it will be. What would be the purpose of giving it a point?
     
    Backyard likes this.
  3. Eli Chaps

    Eli Chaps Basic Member Basic Member

    Apr 20, 2018
    Fair question and one I've asked myself quite a few times as I've been pondering this. A little more versatility is the idea. The "forward" leaning angle does require you to learn where the tip is but that's not a big deal. Really just about retaining the wonderful functionality of the overall shape but giving some more functionality to the tip. And maybe a touch of just modding the knife to really suit my desires.

    This knife has become my primary blade but the tip does have it's limitations.

    That said, I'd be perfectly happy to leave it as is.
     
  4. fishface5

    fishface5

    Feb 3, 2001
    Well right now it is designed with the spine extending past the tip so it will have plenty of weight at the tip. If you gave it a bunka angle (easy enough with a dremel but I would do the work at the very top by hand so as not to ruin the heat treat) you would get a lightweight point. So it depends on whether it's worth the trade-off for you. But note it won't perform exactly like a bunka because those blades aren't as wide as this one is.
     
  5. Eli Chaps

    Eli Chaps Basic Member Basic Member

    Apr 20, 2018
    Understood and agree on all points. I reckon this all part of why I haven't done it.

    Thanks for weighing in. No pun intended. :)
     
  6. Spideyjg

    Spideyjg

    236
    Nov 7, 2017
    A nakiri is a unique blade and I would leave it alone. Draw your idea on it with a sharpie and watch how much metal you would lose. It would likely whack the balance.

    Look up Kiwi knives they are real cheap blades made in Thailand. Our local Asian markets have them for $4 or so. They have nakiris in the lineup. Try it on that if you insist.
     
    Eli Chaps likes this.
  7. Eli Chaps

    Eli Chaps Basic Member Basic Member

    Apr 20, 2018
    I'll most likely leave it be. This particular knife is going to get gifted at Christmas and I'm going to get another. I've started thinning the edge a bit on this one and will do a little more before I gift it. So it was the replacement I was pondering this on but still probably won't. This really is a great knife at a great price.

    Often this place (you folks) serve as a great sounding board when I have an idea rolling around in my head but can't make up my mind. :)
     
  8. jpm2

    jpm2

    Nov 19, 2014
    For me personally if a knife is replaceable, there's no second thoughts about reshaping blades and handles. Almost all knives to me are replaceable. :)
     
    Eli Chaps likes this.
  9. drail

    drail

    363
    Feb 23, 2008
    I have cut down several large chef's knives into a nakiri shape and they are both heavily used by me wife and I both in the kitchen. It's not a true nakiri but it is an extremely useful blade on vegetables and with the proper hone angle it will resist edge rolling. I don't think that Green River really needs thinning unless you need to slice tomatoes. Mine works really well on chopping garlic and onions and dicing peppers. My wife thought it was kind of weird at first but now she grabs it for a lot of work. Round over the spine where your hand rests to make it more comfortable. Try one. Once you go Asian you'll never go back........
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2019
    Eli Chaps likes this.
  10. Eli Chaps

    Eli Chaps Basic Member Basic Member

    Apr 20, 2018
    I got the spine and choil pretty comfortable. The thinning is slight and more focused at the tip and a little more, I don't know, uniformity along the edge. I also got good even bevels on both sides now.

    I use this knife way beyond vegetables. It slices and chops meat, butterflies chicken breasts, and really is my general purpose knife. Of course a good chef's knife/gyuto need to be used for some things but this guy does a lot of the lifting around my kitchen.
     

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