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Finnish/Earlier Scandi axes - Kirves

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Agent_H, Sep 10, 2016.

  1. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    You're exactly right, Ernest. People either don't want to do the work or don't want to give up so much steel but for whichever reason they don't grind the heel back to match the damage on the toe. In the process the axe' geometry gets all fouled up.
     
  2. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    It's fun to see it translated....

    https://translate.google.com/transl...ps://puusorvaamo.eu/kirveenvarret/&edit-text=
     
  3. Jani

    Jani

    16
    Jun 29, 2018
    Yes, I visited the same small factory and bought few longer handles. By the way, they used to import hickory from Alabama years ago but nowadays use only birch.[​IMG]
     
  4. Kevin Houtzager

    Kevin Houtzager

    667
    Jun 25, 2017
    I would count preferrence out just yet: I've had this one, with at first sight a weird shaped heel. (the 31 is the production year)
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    First glance would say sharpened the wrong way. When I got it there was actually some blood on it on a low spot underneath the paint. Used in the late '30's in Finland in the war with Russia. It wasn't used for cutting trees, but as a weapon during that time= sharp edge for trusting and less likely to get caught when slashing.

    So yes it mostly wrong kind of sharpening, but not always.

    Another example I had which I don't have pictures of was a double sides nessmuck type of hatchet, belonging to a construction worker for all of his life. The guy specialised in bathrooms. He had his axe modified with diamond shaped blades. The reason being that he could get tiles of the walls quicker using his hatchet. I do have a picture of the restored hatchet, but since it's not a finnish one I'll leave it out of this topic.

    Other that there are still 2 other kinds of reasons for doing it:
    - Getting another balance point: Changing the tip also changes the balance, not always a bad thing.
    - Getting better or worse penetration: Penetration being force divided by impact area. A straight blade slows more down then a curved blade therefore it penetrates more deeply. Curving the blade more will make it penetrate more. And visa versa.

    That being said: Most likely chance is still wrong sharpening for the most part ;)
     
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  5. rjdankert

    rjdankert Basic Member Basic Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    [​IMG]




    Bob
     
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  6. Jani

    Jani

    16
    Jun 29, 2018
    Not that badly spent Sunday. Found this planing(?) axe aka piilukirves yesterday at the flea market. Probably this is made by some village blacksmith. It was 100 % rusty. Now it's hungry for some log house finishing. I had a piece of rowan suitable for the handle. Billnäs 61.2 was just perfect tool for the work. I didn't have to use any other tools, just sandpaper for finishing. That old steel makes you wonder how many houses have been finished with it and what kind of hands have grabbed it? One thing is for sure those hands didn't use keyboard
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2018
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  7. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Your pictures were great - That isn't something I will find at a local flea market.

    Bit of a socket eye rebuild and some sharpening.
    [​IMG]
    A-frame.kindling
    by Agent Hierarchy

    [​IMG]
    A-frame.kindling
    by Agent Hierarchy
    It can heat itself but feeding the stove is more fun. The Kemi held up to quarter splitting and kindling for four days/nights of use.
    Handy “house axe”.
    [​IMG]
    A-frame.kindling
    by Agent Hierarchy

    [​IMG]
    A-frame.kindling
    by Agent Hierarchy

    And one because it caught my eye there.
    [​IMG]
    A-frame.kindling
    by Agent Hierarchy
     
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  8. Jani

    Jani

    16
    Jun 29, 2018
    Took out my axes since I got some firewood to chop. The newest ones in collection are Billnäs 1123 and 7.2. 1123 has number 64 in the other side. I was surprised that these more rounded models are so old - assuming the 64 states for year. Though I like the original shape much more this is also a handy axe. I can't find many things more relaxing than chopping wood with good axe.[​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    I also stored some handle material for drying. Birch and goat willow (Salix caprea). That willow will be very nice looking with brown and cream-white colors. Don't know about the durability though. We will know after couple of years.
    [​IMG]
     
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  9. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    My goodness Jani... That is a gaggle of beautiful Finnish steel - great photos as well.
    [​IMG]
    Calendar stuff lol!
    The mono steel ones seem interesting as well. I would imagine the "64" is the date of production.

    I have a No. 7 that needs a handle. They seem a bit like the big sister to the 61.x's, just going plus-sized.
    [​IMG]

    I like axes that do most of the work for me, was out today limbing up an old plum tree with one of mine. It's a foot around at the base and it's ready for my crosscut to quietly harvest some of the trunk. I'm hoping to wedge and split it there to save hassle.
    [​IMG]
    Plum.tree
    by Agent Hierarchy

    [​IMG]
    Plum.tree
    by Agent Hierarchy

    [​IMG]
    Plum.tree
    by Agent Hierarchy
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2018
    jake pogg and Square_peg like this.
  10. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Along the same lines - wood to make shorter "varsi" ;)
    Thinking from here back might yield some natural offset if necessary. (There was a Finnish axe just off screen)
    [​IMG]
    Plum.tree
    by Agent Hierarchy
     
  11. Square_peg

    Square_peg

    Feb 1, 2012
    Plum is good wood for handles. And don't forget to save some for the smoker. IMHO there is no better smoking wood than a plum/hickory mix.
     
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  12. Jani

    Jani

    16
    Jun 29, 2018
    Agent_H, you also have great pictures! That plum tree seems very thick. Do you have those growing in nature or are those planted in gardens? Noticed that I have an error in that earlier post related to Billnäs 7. There is no different sizes in that pattern. It is just 7. Shape is similar to 61.x but 7 is so large that I cannot imagine it being used for carving. Seems more like chopping axe. I tested it today and seems perfect for chopping bigger trees.
     
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  13. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Than you. Your pictures not working?
     
  14. Kevin Houtzager

    Kevin Houtzager

    667
    Jun 25, 2017
    I've actually have the same wood almost dried for a year here in the shed. Has a greenish hue to it. Still need to make a haft for the skeggox one day using this wood.
     
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  15. Jani

    Jani

    16
    Jun 29, 2018
    Was visiting a national park and there was a Billnäs 1210. Great chopping axe welded into water pipe. They use to use as ugly handles as possible in national parks' axes to prevent stealing.
    [​IMG]
     
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  16. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Jani's photo:
    [​IMG]
    I bet that thing gets the job done even with the pipe in it. Makes it too heavy to pack out at least lol. It doesn’t double as a shower head does it?

    “In case of fire, attach handle to hose”

    Poor old 1210. It probably sees some action around the camp?
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2018
  17. Jani

    Jani

    16
    Jun 29, 2018
    Just one more of those Kemi 12/3:s. Prepared this as a gift for friend. It took over a day to clean the head from rust and carve a new handle. Head is in quite good shape and as they say Billnäs axe will last for at least four generations - You only need to replace the handle for 10 times and head 3 times. I wonder if someone has figured out what those extra markings mean? Like in here there is "I" and in many Kellokoski axes there is mark C.
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    Last edited: Jul 24, 2018
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  18. Jani

    Jani

    16
    Jun 29, 2018
    Goes little bit offtopic but I came across with a weird looking axe (at least in Finland) in an antiquity shop. I told to the seller it looks like imported but he told it's probably made in some smaller smithy. Well I cleaned the stamp and it appears to be made in Germany by J.Wiebelhaus & Co in Meschede. I guess this could came to Finland with the Wehrmacht during WWII. Or then somebody just had the money to buy German-made axe and didn't count on the Finnish quality. Also grapped a 12/1 Kellokoski with an old handle that has a perfect feeling for a little bit heavier axe like 12/1. I will definitely copy this. It has also a nice face figure in the swell. Total length is just 29" which feels perfect for me.
    [​IMG]
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    Last edited: Jul 24, 2018
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  19. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Jani, I wish we could see your pictures!
     
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  20. Jani

    Jani

    16
    Jun 29, 2018
    Sorry. Google pics just wont work for some reason. I need to check those when back in home from trip. And I have some steel to bring home as well. I will let you know what kind of...
     
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