Gyuto with non Wa handle design

Joined
Oct 19, 2017
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295
Hi,

Here is a 210 mm Gyuto style I just finished over the weekend. The blade was sitting around for a while now, so I thought I would finish the handle and see how it looks.

I tried a different handle profile, than the authentic Wa style, just for fun. Thickest part of the spine is at 0.08".

What do you think?

All comments are welcomed!


IMG-2869.jpg


There is some dust right on the edge, but you get the idea of the grind.

IMG-2870.jpg


Thanks,
Constantin
 

herisson

Apple slicing rocking chair dweller
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Mar 11, 2013
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I think it's beautiful ! While I have a preference for the traditional style some of my favorite knives are quite "out of the box" !
 
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Oct 19, 2017
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I think it's beautiful ! While I have a preference for the traditional style some of my favorite knives are quite "out of the box" !
Thank you. Yes, I also like the traditional handles, just wanted to try something different, with scales this time around.
 

Richard338

Gold Member
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May 3, 2005
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Nice job. The profile, grind, and handle should make it nicely functional.
I think attention to a few very minor details would take it to the next level.
In your second photo, you can see the underside of the profile wasn't cleaned up and there are a couple epoxy streaks.
You could carefully sand from the spine, all around the handle to make it bright and smooth.
I also suggest shaping the front of the handle pieces while pinned together, before attaching to the blade.
Especially if you have a disc grinder, you can get them smooth and symmetrical.
A bit of tedious work to get the front of the handles to the same finish you will do on the rest of the handle after glue up will pay off.

(I have a few kitchen knives I made 15 years ago still in use and I see these same issues every day...).
 
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The cutting edge profile looks to be a little too flat....I’ve made flatter profiles but yours looks a little too flat. However it Could be the angle of the picture

handle looks like it could benefit from some rounding and contouring for comfort
 
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Oct 19, 2017
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Great, thank you for your feedback. I agree with your comments. I admit, I rushed it a bit just to get it done.
 
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The cutting edge profile looks to be a little too flat....I’ve made flatter profiles but yours looks a little too flat. However it Could be the angle of the picture

handle looks like it could benefit from some rounding and contouring for comfort

I agree, my feel as well is that I went a little too flat on the edge profile. Right on with your assessment, good to hear it from someone else, thank you!
 
Joined
Jun 15, 2012
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I agree with what HSC said.
I do much prefer non-traditional handles on japanese-ish knives, so good initiative!
Wa handles are yesterday's news and a little tired if you ask me. But opinions vary and change, maybe I'll make one at some point. At this point nothing beats a smoothly contoured western handle, for me.
 

Stacy E. Apelt - Bladesmith

ilmarinen - MODERATOR
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You are correct. I had it stored as a photo from the Z-knives data pages and just assumed it was a nomenclature. Yo Gyuto sound good. Wa gyuto is Japanese style handle.
 
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For the sake of clarity, Japanese cooking knives (houchou) can be divided into Wa-bouchou (traditional knives) and Yo-Bouchou (western knives).
The Wa-bouchous are represented by the single bevel knives such as the Yanagiba and Deba which use the traditional tang in the wood handle.
The Yo-Bouchous are represented by the Gyuto, petty.

The Gyuto (accurately translates as "Beef Knife") developed from European chef knives brought to Japan in the mid-later 1800s when western cuisine became adopted as part of Japanese cuisine. The Gyuto still sometimes goes by it's earlier name Yo-Bouchou (Western cooking knife).
The Wa-Gyuto that is all the rage outside of Japan is a relatively new creation that meets the demands of western customers who want the "traditional" aspects of Japanese knives but more suited to western cooking. You will hardly ever see a Wa-gyuto used in Japan, while western handled Gyutos are fairly common.

So the term "Gyuto" is a western handled, full tang knife by default. There is no such thing as a Yo-Gyuto "Western gyuto" in Japan.
The OP's very handsome Gyuto is just that, a Gyuto. Or a Yo-Bouchou.

There are other cross over terms though, such as the double beveled Yanagiba called Sujihiki. As well as the Yo-Deba. Both western handled and double beveled versions of traditional Japanese fish knives. And Wa-Gyuto of course describes Gyutos with wa-handles.
 
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Old adage, if you don't have time to do it right you sure don't have time to do it over.
I totally agree with you, should have put the time and finished it properly.

Just as a comment, I was not happy with the edge being too flat, so I pretty much considered the blade a failure from the beginning, however I wanted to see how the handle/scales look on this design. Not an excuse, but just wanted to mention it. I always try to finish things to the best of my abilities, but I have a hard time putting the effort in something that I don’t consider to be worthy.

Anyway, you brought up a very good point, thanks.
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2017
Messages
295
For the sake of clarity, Japanese cooking knives (houchou) can be divided into Wa-bouchou (traditional knives) and Yo-Bouchou (western knives).
The Wa-bouchous are represented by the single bevel knives such as the Yanagiba and Deba which use the traditional tang in the wood handle.
The Yo-Bouchous are represented by the Gyuto, petty.

The Gyuto (accurately translates as "Beef Knife") developed from European chef knives brought to Japan in the mid-later 1800s when western cuisine became adopted as part of Japanese cuisine. The Gyuto still sometimes goes by it's earlier name Yo-Bouchou (Western cooking knife).
The Wa-Gyuto that is all the rage outside of Japan is a relatively new creation that meets the demands of western customers who want the "traditional" aspects of Japanese knives but more suited to western cooking. You will hardly ever see a Wa-gyuto used in Japan, while western handled Gyutos are fairly common.

So the term "Gyuto" is a western handled, full tang knife by default. There is no such thing as a Yo-Gyuto "Western gyuto" in Japan.
The OP's very handsome Gyuto is just that, a Gyuto. Or a Yo-Bouchou.

There are other cross over terms though, such as the double beveled Yanagiba called Sujihiki. As well as the Yo-Deba. Both western handled and double beveled versions of traditional Japanese fish knives. And Wa-Gyuto of course describes Gyutos with wa-handles.

Great info, thanks so much for sharing.
 
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Oct 19, 2017
Messages
295
Regrind the edge profile shortening the heel Height
Or take the tip up higher

WpQxVge.jpg

Yes, I’m working on a new profile version with more belly, the heel height is already too short as it is. Could do the tip grind, but I rather go for a new enhanced version, keeping the intended blade length.

Thanks again, I appreciate your feedback,
Constantin
 
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