Recommendation? Hollow ground folders?

Makael

Books temporarily closed on sheath orders.
Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
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Oct 17, 2015
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This
It’s not hollow ground, but...
View attachment 1214641
Is totally the way to go. They flip like a knife and never need sharpening. Keep your knife for other things.

I've seen so many around lumberyards with most of the paint gone. Ask the guys and They would agree.
 

herisson

Apple slicing rocking chair dweller
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Mar 11, 2013
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But it's not a knife... and I insist a longer blade cuts better and for a longer time than any short blade. At least in cardboard...
 

ChazzyP

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Dec 27, 2014
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This thread reminded me I had this pic in my files which is somewhat relevant to the discussion, though the razor scraper and scissors aren't really viable cardboard cutters. These are just what I had on hand when putting new edge guide tapes on my Festool tracks.

mlExbJB.jpg


Anyway, as a carpenter, the most oft-used knife on the job is my beat-up old Stanley retractable carried in its pocket in my nail bags. Call it a sheetrock or utility knife or a box cutter, it's the tool-of-choice for thin sheet goods, drywall, felt paper, FG or foam insulation and most anything else on a construction job.

Cutting down boxes doesn't come into play that much at work, though, and that's one task for which I actually prefer to use a folder. The problem with the "box cutter" is its shortness of blade that leads to a trailing tip snagging the inner face of corrugated cardboard, having to switch sides to re-cut and re-start. I prefer to cut boxes free-standing, dropping the knife vertically and like a long handle for grip and a long blade to stay full engaged. While a hollow ground like the pictured Sebenza works well, I really like broad FFGs that track well through the cut, are thin behind the edge, and of not-too-thick stock. Something like one of my Military's or Shiros work great. The other day I cut down some heavy corrugated boxes with my Cheburkov Raven and it just flew through them. Of course being wicked sharp helps too and the edges in most quality folders hold up well if the cardboard is free of sand, dirt, and you stay away from any staples. :eek:
 
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The american lawman would have been a good suggestion but it is no longer hollow ground and it's fairly thick at the edge, so you'll be spending more time sharpening than you'd like.

WE makes a lot of knives that are thinly hollow ground. I would still recommend just using a box cutter for boxes, that was you can keep the folder on your person and use it for tasks that needs the extra blade length, if you have any.
 

tiguy7

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Jun 25, 2008
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7,211
image.jpeg Some
But it's not a knife... and I insist a longer blade cuts better and for a longer time than any short blade. At least in cardboard...

Some box cutters expose more blade. I use laminated blades with TiN coating. They cost twice as much but last 3X as long.
 

AntDog

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Apr 3, 2001
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I used to cut a lot of cardboard and plastic and tar paper impregnated kraft paper at my last job. Tons of it.

Any knife will work for this. Some are not optimal, and some go dull a lot faster than others.

The main gripe I had was with choils. No matter if it was the goofy little sharpening choils, “elf choils”, or the larger ones you can put a finger into - they would all get hung up, and are not desirable.

Some knives would hold a good working edge for around a year with this type of work. It’s hard to believe, but it’s true. Cold Steel’s AUS8 would last me a couple of months before it needed resharpened, and would no longer shave hair after only one day.
 
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GB940Rookie

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Apr 19, 2016
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2,870
This thread reminded me I had this pic in my files which is somewhat relevant to the discussion, though the razor scraper and scissors aren't really viable cardboard cutters. These are just what I had on hand when putting new edge guide tapes on my Festool tracks.

mlExbJB.jpg


Anyway, as a carpenter, the most oft-used knife on the job is my beat-up old Stanley retractable carried in its pocket in my nail bags. Call it a sheetrock or utility knife or a box cutter, it's the tool-of-choice for thin sheet goods, drywall, felt paper, FG or foam insulation and most anything else on a construction job.

Cutting down boxes doesn't come into play that much at work, though, and that's one task for which I actually prefer to use a folder. The problem with the "box cutter" is its shortness of blade that leads to a trailing tip snagging the inner face of corrugated cardboard, having to switch sides to re-cut and re-start. I prefer to cut boxes free-standing, dropping the knife vertically and like a long handle for grip and a long blade to stay full engaged. While a hollow ground like the pictured Sebenza works well, I really like broad FFGs that track well through the cut, are thin behind the edge, and of not-too-thick stock. Something like one of my Military's or Shiros work great. The other day I cut down some heavy corrugated boxes with my Cheburkov Raven and it just flew through them. Of course being wicked sharp helps too and the edges in most quality folders hold up well if the cardboard is free of sand, dirt, and you stay away from any staples. :eek:
As a fellow carpenter, I completely agree.

My Gayle Bradley 2 is a cardboard cuttin’ light saber. The GB1, with it’s negative blade angle, even more so.
 
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Apr 3, 2015
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E41-A6-B45-CC94-465-B-9-D96-3-C8971846-FEC.jpg

Not to sound like a broken record, but the picture above is what I suggest. They are cheap, durable, and almost hassle free. If you blade breaks or dulls, you just simply swap it out with a new one.
 

bflying

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Mar 4, 2014
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I've tried a metric crap load of knives on boxes over the years (internet retail). Many were adequate, some were good, and many absolutely horrible. But for some reason, two stand out in my memory as being fantastic on boxes. A Spyderco Delica, and Cold Steel Mini Tuff Lite. The Tuff Lite may seem like an obvious choice as it looks like a box cutter, but works so much better. And the Delica is completely different, but just seemed to plow cardboard like an animal.
 
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Feb 10, 2014
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Get a Cold Steel Tuff Lite...its a box cutter on steroids
This. The first thing that came to mind when i thought hollow.ground box cutter. Beat the crap out of it, theyre dang near indestructible, and if you do manage to ruin it somehow, just pony up another 20-30 bucks.
 
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Feb 10, 2014
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But it's not a knife... and I insist a longer blade cuts better and for a longer time than any short blade. At least in cardboard...
I gotta disagree. Cutting boxes, a short blade is much better for leverage. Any time i cut boxes i just want a short locking blade. If you need it ton ast long, thats in the steel, IMO.
 
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Sep 18, 2019
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Wow! I expected to get some good ideas but you guys are gonna have me knife shopping for a while now. Thanks everybody for the awesome suggestions. And Its a very good point several of you make about just using a box cutter but unfortunately that doesnt scratch the itch of my knife addiction at all lol. This new job actually provides box cutters but also the option to use your own knife if you prefer which I definitely do. Im def gonna look into quite a few of these suggestions. Like the american lawman and the tuff lite. And there were several others I didnt realize were hollow ground like the civivi elementum which ive heard nothing but good things about. And I actually came close to getting a gayle bradley a long time ago but never pulled the trigger on it. Ive tried different knife sites but none actually have a filter for hollow ground knives that i could find so all these suggestions are Extremely helpful. And if anyone thinks of anything else I would love to hear it. Thanks guys!
 

afishhunter

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Oct 21, 2014
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Stanley box cutter and a few extra blades is your best bet for cutting a lot of cardboard, and/or Drywall, Roofing Shingles, Linolium ...

If you want something with a bit more "class" (and it is not against your employer's rules and regulations to carry and possess a knife on the job)
Consider an SK Blades "Smoke Jumper" or "The Shield" Buck 110LT.
Both have a CPM154 blade with the unbeatable BOS heat treat.
The Smoke Jumper has a clip point, The Shield a drop point.
Either was under $40 the last time I checked.
 
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Sep 19, 2007
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....Another old school Spydie would be the Centofante 3.

I have a Centofante 3 in my pocket right now and it is a great cutter with he hollow grind and 2mm thick blade. HOWEVER the handle is also on the thin side being only 10,5mm thick. If you exert too much pressure on it for too long of a time... you may get some disconfort in your hand.

Mikel
 

lambertiana

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Jul 7, 2000
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Spyderco Bradley 1 or 2 would work very well.

That being said, when I have a lot of cardboard to cut I use one of the standard box cutters with replaceable blades. The thin blades work well and you can change them out whenever they get dull.
 
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