Introduction...Hello everyone

Discussion in 'Kitchen Cutlery & Tools' started by Bo NJ, Sep 13, 2020 at 11:19 PM.

  1. Bo NJ

    Bo NJ

    3
    Sunday
    I am not sure if this is the "right room" -- and I apologize if it's not -- but I wanted to introduce myself and say hello. In short, name is Bo, from NJ, I love to cook, know nothing about knives, but very interested in learning. I've had a few friends/family members give me some gifts (knowing I love to cook), so I have a couple of knives. Good, bad, I have no idea, LOL. However, like I said, I am very interested in learning and buying a few new knives.

    Thanks and looking forward to enjoying the forum!
     
  2. Ourorboros

    Ourorboros

    473
    Jan 23, 2017
    Hello, welcome.
    I suggest you also learn to sharpen - and there is a Maintenance sub-forum where we talk about just that. After all, once a knife is blunt it doesn't matter if it was a nice knife or not.
     
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  3. LUW

    LUW

    668
    Nov 24, 2009
    Welcome aboard Bo! :thumbsup:

    Yes, at the same time you get good knives, you should also learn to sharpen them. While many good knives will come nicely sharpen out of the box, and some even razor sharp, they will get dull eventually. Sharpening knives is not a no-brainer, without a doubt, and that will take a little while to learn (and get all the crap that you need :confused:) but to maintain an edge is quite easy. Depending on what knives you have or are going to get, a honing rod, a leather strap and some dedication will keep a good edge going for a long time, without the need to actually sharpening the blade.
     
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  4. Eli Chaps

    Eli Chaps Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Apr 20, 2018
    I agree about sharpening. I would strongly suggest not buying more expensive knives until you understand sharpening. There are many paths you can take and your preferred knife style and steel type will influence those decisions.
     
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  5. Bo NJ

    Bo NJ

    3
    Sunday
    Thank you very much everyone. So, I was simply going to reply on a local vendor who shows up to the farmer's market here. I have not used him, but I know several local chefs who do. He not only sharpens, but does what I think one of the chef's called "edge maintenance" or something of the like. The chef told me he uses leather strops, honing rods, stones, and I don't know what else he told me, LOL. However, he said that he does other things, aside from just sharpening.

    So, I was going to use him...primarily so that...I don't screw anything up! LOL.

    Thanks for the advice everyone!!!
     
  6. LUW

    LUW

    668
    Nov 24, 2009
    If you have someone that can sharpen your blades, that makes things a lot simpler. Still, I would recommend that you at least learn how to "maintain an edge", which is quite easy to learn and doesn't demand buying too much stuff - basically a honing rod and strop. A well-sharpened blade is really easy to keep very sharp, but basically you would have to touch-up the edge after every use (doesn't take more than a couple of minutes).
     
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  7. Bo NJ

    Bo NJ

    3
    Sunday
    Thanks...time and effort is never a problem for me...it's knowledge and proper implementation! LOL. Getting a honing rod and strop is not a problem. Thanks again.
     

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