Machete time!

22-rimfire

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I take the opposite approach. Sometimes I get outdoors just so I have an excuse to carry the big knife. :) I used to carry it every day when I worked outside more.

I just received my Kingfisher from Baryonyx Knife Works. Still have to sharpen it and cobble together some kind of sheath so I can actually carry it, but I'm expecting its long reach & relatively light weight will be much appreciated for clearing briars & thorns.

the-kingfisher-machete-20.gif
Be careful with that thang! I also love machetes, but I still have to be a little reasonable about my choices. But as I said before, I pretty much have settled on Condor stuff even though it sometimes costs a bit more. I really like their sheaths overall and that is at least a $20-$30 addition.
 
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I love all of your machetes. I have an older, plastic handled one and I also have a Martindale Golok that I still wonder what it is actually designed for.
Did I mention I love machetes?
Grind a real convex edge on that Golok and you will learn to love it.
 

bikerector

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You might be right but first I'd have to learn how to grind out a convex edge.

Remember all of my posts over in the swamp rat thread? Golok work. I just happen to be using a rucki as a golok after losing my condor golok to a bad deal.

Golok's are aimed at woody vegetation instead of pure leafy stuff. A mix between a chopper and a thin machete. I think a golok is technically a type of parang and I know there are some "how to use a parang" vids on youtube.
 

Uncle Timbo

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Remember all of my posts over in the swamp rat thread? Golok work. I just happen to be using a rucki as a golok after losing my condor golok to a bad deal.

Golok's are aimed at woody vegetation instead of pure leafy stuff. A mix between a chopper and a thin machete. I think a golok is technically a type of parang and I know there are some "how to use a parang" vids on youtube.

Thanks BE! So if I understand correctly, leave the Golic at home when I hike thru the rain forest? :)
I'm kidding. Thanks for the insight. I've had that thing for about 4-5 years and it looks new. I think I'll pull it out this summer and take her whacking. My shoulder should be healed up enough.
 

bikerector

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Thanks BE! So if I understand correctly, leave the Golic at home when I hike thru the rain forest? :)
I'm kidding. Thanks for the insight. I've had that thing for about 4-5 years and it looks new. I think I'll pull it out this summer and take her whacking. My shoulder should be healed up enough.

That's a shame. Machetes deserved to be used and beat on. Definitely leave that one at home for the jungle. If not for the thickness then for the lack of reach.

I know I've looked at that one a couple times but that little dip in front of the handle worries me for long term longevity. It's the right length for a portable slasher and should be beefy enough to take out small trees.
 

Uncle Timbo

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That's a shame. Machetes deserved to be used and beat on. Definitely leave that one at home for the jungle. If not for the thickness then for the lack of reach.

I know I've looked at that one a couple times but that little dip in front of the handle worries me for long term longevity. It's the right length for a portable slasher and should be beefy enough to take out small trees.
I'll take her out on a date when the weather breaks and feed her all the small crap she can eat.
 

22-rimfire

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Machetes are meant to be used. That's why you need to choose one that is comfortable to use wearing at least with a pair of gloves. Gloves have become a standard field item for me. I'll keep a pair in my day pack if I'm out tramping around. Tired of cuts, skinned up fingers and hands when all I needed was a pair of gloves. The glove thing is the No. 1 thing that I took to heart watching the survivor shows along with I doubt I could make a friction fire if my life depended on it. So, I carry fire making stuff with me too (but I always pretty much did that).
 

bikerector

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+1 for gloves. Helps keep the briars and poison ivy away. I've tried many and I always seem to come bag to leather as I haven't found a synthetic palmed pair that allows for adequate grip and longevity. The fake leather stuff is pretty close.

I'm currently working through a set of mechanix leather gloves which I like as abrasion resistant and high dexterity options; low impact/vibration resistance but I can perform pretty much any task with them, except for the more complicated knots. And they're supposed to be machine washable, which was the big draw towards the synthetics after a rough summer of rashes from my woods.
 

Henry Beige

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Thanks for this thread. I hope it is not too necro for this post.

I recently bought a Martindale Golok, mostly for its looks, and for an attractive sale price. It sure is cute, but it doesn’t cut much, even with some file work to put an edge on the existing grind. I like the way it feels, but the grind is more obtuse than my Condor Golok, as well as just about every other machete I own. I have no experience in reprofiling a blade, but it has to be thinner, and I think the process will also convex it.
 

bikerector

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Thanks for this thread. I hope it is not too necro for this post.

I recently bought a Martindale Golok, mostly for its looks, and for an attractive sale price. It sure is cute, but it doesn’t cut much, even with some file work to put an edge on the existing grind. I like the way it feels, but the grind is more obtuse than my Condor Golok, as well as just about every other machete I own. I have no experience in reprofiling a blade, but it has to be thinner, and I think the process will also convex it.

That's interesting as I thought the condor golok could use some thinning down before mine was stolen. I've looked at the martingdale quite a few times, seems like the basic shape should do well as a limb chopper.

My only recommendation, to save some effort, is to spend the time re-profiling the main cutting area first, which usually the last 1/2 of the blade. You can always come back for the rest of it but it will cut the time in half and long blades can take a really long time to re-profile, simply because of the amount of edge you have to work with.
 
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Henry Beige

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That's interesting as I though the condor golok could use some thinning down before mine was stolen. I've looked at the martingdale quite a few times, seems like the basic shape should do well as a limb chopper.

I agree about the Condor, but that looks like an even bigger project.
 
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Thanks for this thread. I hope it is not too necro for this post.

I recently bought a Martindale Golok, mostly for its looks, and for an attractive sale price. It sure is cute, but it doesn’t cut much, even with some file work to put an edge on the existing grind. I like the way it feels, but the grind is more obtuse than my Condor Golok, as well as just about every other machete I own. I have no experience in reprofiling a blade, but it has to be thinner, and I think the process will also convex it.

Do you own a belt sander? Or a worksharp? Start with really low numbered belts 40-60 and raise the shoulder on that edge 1/2”. Then using the slack part of the belt convex down to the edge.
 
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Old thread , but , Hey Monster what did the tank look like under that Imacasa molded handle?

Was it a full tang / full length with holes already for rivets or a cut down short thin tang?

I thinned down and modified a little bit on a Imacasa molded handle wear your index finger would grip and didnt hit and metal tang material, but I didnt take that much off top and bottom
Rick
d3ff8360-b739-4b71-89f5-69d6dc70038e-jpeg.1005786


View attachment 1005786 Well I went out and picked up an Imicasa 12” machete for more yard work. The handle was ok but a bit on the round side for me so I took the sucker off! I had some G10 scales laying around so threw them on and started shaping the handle. It’s not quite where I want it yet but here it is, hoping to use it on some mulberry tree limbs this weekend. This one needs a lot of edge work.
 

bikerector

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Old thread , but , Hey Monster what did the tank look like under that Imacasa molded handle?

Was it a full tang / full length with holes already for rivets or a cut down short thin tang?

I thinned down and modified a little bit on a Imacasa molded handle wear your index finger would grip and didnt hit and metal tang material, but I didnt take that much off top and bottom
Rick
d3ff8360-b739-4b71-89f5-69d6dc70038e-jpeg.1005786

FortyTwoBlades FortyTwoBlades knows this one
 

FortyTwoBlades

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Generally Imacasas with molded handles have a full tang under the plastic, but some may have a nearly-full-width stick tang of sorts (that is to say, it's a full length tang that doesn't follow the profile perfectly.) There's usually a hole in the tang for the lanyard hole, if present, and maybe a tooling hole, but there's not usually any other holes pre-made for scales or anything.
 

monster

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Yup the tang was short of full tang, I ended up doing a mortised tang and pinned it 4 times (including the lanyard hole) with a good amount of epoxy. All the holes you see pinned and lanyard hole were already present and just needed cleaning up and the pins took some fitting. It’s holding strong and has carved up almond tree limbs, vines and even some fruitless pear tree limbs with no problems, none of the limbs were overly thick though.
 

monster

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I forgot to add that this sucker spends a lot of time on my belt when in the backyard or the orchard as it is light and just the right size for my uses. I usually wear gloves when I work so the the thinner handle works out fine for me.
 

USMCPOP

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Old thread, but for the record here's the tang of a molded handle Imacasa. Probably the Pata de Cuche Latin pattern.

upload_2019-12-27_12-43-33.jpeg
 
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