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My first Spydercos

Discussion in 'Spyderco' started by Pteronarcyd, Jul 19, 2019.

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  1. Pteronarcyd

    Pteronarcyd

    181
    Feb 19, 2019
    I have long regarded Spyderco knives to be horrendously ugly, due primarily to the hump added to most of their blades to allow for the thumbhole. As a trained scientist and one who fully subscribes to the Anglo-American Enlightenment, I respect empiricism (as I must), and cannot ignore that Spyderco knives have many fans willing to pay premium prices for their products. Thus, to see for myself whether the acclaim for the Spyderco brand is grounded in reality or is just another example of argumentum ad populum run amok (like the Glockaholic phenomenon), I broke down and ordered a couple of knives.

    My two selection criteria were 1) no fugly hump on the blade spine, and 2) no commodity blade steel. I identified three candidates, the Native 5, the Chaparral, and the Lil' Native. I pulled the trigger on the latter two. I wanted the Chaparral Lightweight, because I like FRN scales; but, I could find none in stock, so I opted for the Raffir Noble scales. (If I had waited a day or two, plenty of Lightweights could have been found.). I chose the compression lock for the Lil' Native, to avoid getting two lockbacks and to try a new-for-me lock.

    The knives arrived a couple days ago. With regard to the Chaparral, the scales are gorgeous, but they are smooth. As I had learned from a review or comment, the smooth scales can mean less than secure pocket retention. On the other hand, the knife clips into a pocket and extracts with ease. The scales preclude the knife being used hard, so I will relegate it to gentleman's carry, which means it won't see much use.

    I sliced up an apple with the Chaparral and was pleasantly surprised at how well it did the job. It is clearly my best slicer, something I was hoping its thin blade might excel at. With the back lock I haven't been able to flick the blade open yet. I may be putting pressure on the locking mechanism. The absence of a detent seems to not be conducive to flicking. Is flicking lockbacks not doable, or am I doing something wrong?

    Some reviewers have griped about the lock release being so narrow as to be painful to use, but I find that to be nonsense. I've found a few of my knives don't live up to what seem to be consensus opinions, both good and bad, of knife reviewers. I suspect many knife reviewers just feed off one another to establish a faux consensus devoid of serious empiricism; i.e., incestual opinion abounds. I think many reviews are published without even bothering to break in a knife -- presumably there is a premium placed on being first to publish rather than publishing a quality empirical review.

    As to the Lil' Native, the first thing I noticed was the scales. The textured G-10 affords a great grip, which I appreciate because of my peripheral neuropathy. The grippiness of the scales makes pocketing and unpocketing the knife somewhat of a challenge, but once pocketed it's not coming out unless I take it out with something of a tussle. The little blade (small enough for an adult to lawfully carry in Chicago) tackled an apple just fine, but a day after the Chaparral shined at the task, it wasn't anything to write home about.

    The Lil' Native's blade flicked out nicely with minimal break in after lubricating the pivot. I even middle-finger flicked it twice just before writing this. This will be a great EDC knife.

    Bottom line: I will be obtaining more Spydercos, as long as they do not have a spine tumor. And, I will be looking for other slicey knives with thin blades.
     
    colin.p likes this.
  2. FullFlatMind

    FullFlatMind

    127
    May 30, 2019
    Welcome to the sickness!
     
  3. colin.p

    colin.p

    732
    Feb 4, 2017
    "Some reviewers have griped about the lock release being so narrow as to be painful to use, but I find that to be nonsense. I've found a few of my knives don't live up to what seem to be consensus opinions, both good and bad, of knife reviewers. I suspect many knife reviewers just feed off one another to establish a faux consensus devoid of serious empiricism; i.e., incestual opinion abounds. I think many reviews are published without even bothering to break in a knife -- presumably there is a premium placed on being first to publish rather than publishing a quality empirical review."
    What I have found myself.
     
  4. sharp_edge

    sharp_edge Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 30, 2015
    Many of the Spyderco models are still ugly in looking but after one experiences how great their function is, that ugliness can turn into kind of beauty.
     
    TenShun705 and cj65 like this.
  5. metaxasm

    metaxasm Gold Member Gold Member

    750
    Jul 14, 2002
    Don't hate the hump. It makes it eaisier to open and use with gloves. My favorites right now- PM3 and the Stretch. I have never been let down by Spyderco. Glad you are enjoying yours.
     
  6. 5-by-5

    5-by-5 Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 13, 2016
    I know not of this ugliness of which you speak. Though I fell in love with Spyderco in the early 80's. I have a hard time not berating those that flick their knives. We used to punch punks that flicked our knives.
     
  7. Spydergirl88

    Spydergirl88

    444
    Dec 3, 2015
    That's why I never let anyone use my knives
     
    5-by-5 likes this.
  8. Sal Glesser

    Sal Glesser Moderator Moderator

    Dec 27, 1998
    Hi Pteronarcyd,

    Welcome and thanx for giving us a try. Of course, as a scientist, you must recognize that you have already fixed the results by limiting your purchase based on appearance, which is wholly unscientific. I often say "Too much eye, not enough brain".

    I would suggest that you purchase a Delica 4 plain edge flat grind and use it for a while before coming to any conclusions. After all, you want to include the variables? Considering that most of our knives sold, by far, are the "fugly" models with the "fugly" hump. Which means that most of the opinions of users are based on that for which you don't like the looks.

    Just some thoughts to share.

    sal
     
  9. 5-by-5

    5-by-5 Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 13, 2016
    That's funny. I get funny looks from anyone that knows I like great knives, when they ask to use mine and I hand them a Leatherman. LOL
     
  10. FullFlatMind

    FullFlatMind

    127
    May 30, 2019
    It's stuff like this that is part of why I love Spyderco.
     
  11. Rykjeklut

    Rykjeklut Basic Member Basic Member

    May 23, 2018
    What is a "commodity blade steel"?
     
  12. Pteronarcyd

    Pteronarcyd

    181
    Feb 19, 2019
    The relevant usage per Merriam-Webster:

    1. an economic good: such as
    ...
    c. a mass-produced unspecialized product

    ...

    3. a good or service whose wide availability typically leads to smaller profit margins and diminishes the importance of factors (such as brand name) other than price
     
  13. Rykjeklut

    Rykjeklut Basic Member Basic Member

    May 23, 2018
    I know what commodity means. I was after your definition of it. S30V?
     
    orangejoe35 likes this.
  14. mitch13

    mitch13 Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 3, 2004
    There are plenty of options.
    That is well said.
    You have also to consider the hump & spyderedge together, great cutting ability.
    A combo I use often.
     
  15. Pteronarcyd

    Pteronarcyd

    181
    Feb 19, 2019
    Not CPM-S30V, but I see where you are coming from, as this tends to be Spyderco's and Benchmade's most frequently used steel. A commodity steel would generally equate to a budget steel -- something like 8Cr13MoV or AUS8, which really have nothing to offer in today's market other than low price. Sprint runs tend to use noncommodity steels. For example, I doubt Spyderco will ever offer a sprint run of PM2s with AUS8 blades.
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2019
    Rykjeklut likes this.
  16. ferider

    ferider Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    295
    Jun 20, 2018
    Welcome. It will go downhill from here ....

    Yes, back-locks can be flipped, just needs a little training.

    The knives you bought are teeny. One of Spydercos strength (IMHO) is larger blades in great slicers with not-so-common steels.

    You can find a couple of these without [what you call spine tumor]. You really should try, otherwise you are missing out :) K2, Hundred Pacer, etc.

    Regarding the hump, as Sal suggested, try scientifically. Maybe - in the beginning - just use on Wednesdays ?
     
  17. blame it on god

    blame it on god Platinum Member Platinum Member

    Feb 21, 2013
    My favorite slicers are, Manix2's, PM2's, Para3's, Og Millie.........Dragonfly2's. Ugly or unconventionally beautiful?
     
  18. bdmicarta

    bdmicarta Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 16, 2012
    Yes exactly! Although I don't consider them to be that ugly. They funciton beautifully and that proves the old saying "beauty is as beauty does". I buy knives for function and Spyderco models have replaced almost all of the knives of other brands that I carry and use. My favorites are the PM2 and Manix 2, and I have lots of variations of each.
     
  19. 5-by-5

    5-by-5 Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 13, 2016
    [​IMG]
     
  20. ferider

    ferider Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    295
    Jun 20, 2018
    ^^^
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Filoso and orangejoe35 like this.
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