Perhaps the worst enemy of any knife is rust.

kyle007

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Mar 9, 2014
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I am no expert on sharpening the blades of a knife. I have my old standby KA-BAR and several stainless and carbon steel pocket/folder knives that I may carry daily. I have the Lansky 3 stone system I got a long time ago but it is a pain to sharpen multiple knives at one sitting.

I was curious as to the best method and how to properly put and keep an edge on these knives. The stainless steel blades seem to be the toughest to keep the edge sharp. I didn't have the luxury of purchasing high end knives at the time.
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kyle007

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Mar 9, 2014
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Modern knife steel is very high quality material, but all metal will corrode through time. Occasionally oil the joints and springs of a pocket knife with a drop or two of oil. This will assure easier opening and closing and will prevent rust and lessen wear. Wipe the blades now and then with an oil-moistened cloth to prevent rust- especially if you live in a damp climate or close to the ocean. If your blade should get wet, dry it thoroughly. If your knife comes into contact with salt water or any substance you are not certain about, you should rinse it immediately with tap water, dry it and apply a light coat of oil.

Do not store knives in their sheaths. The leather collects moisture and creates pits on the blade.

Check the locking notch of lockbacks regularly to ensure that it will work properly. Keep all sand and grit out of the knife. Keep the mechanisms clean. Remember to never rely on a folding knife to be permanently locked in position.

Do not use the cutting blade as a can opener, chisel, pry bar, screwdriver or for any heavy work for which your knife was not designed. Also, don't use the back of your knife as a hammer. It may break the springs, handles or pin.
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kyle007

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Mar 9, 2014
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Perhaps the worst enemy of any knife is rust. Do not be fooled, even though the manufacturer or maker uses stainless steel. Given the correct conditions, even stainless steel can rust. If one lives and/or works in a marine environment, please pay close attention. Since the air in places like coastal regions has a higher than normal moisture content, with some salt mixed in, it is important to keep the surface of the blade lightly coated with a film of oil. The oil will prevent the salt-tinged moist air from coming into contact with the blade steel. Any household grade lubricating oil will suffice. A particular brand that I use is 3-In-One. It is available at your local hardware stores or home centers. 3-In-One is also good for lubricating folding knives, but before you do so I suggest you read my upcoming section on Folding Knife Lubrication. This particular oil does not have an odor, unlike WD-40. Do not get me wrong. WD-40 is great for this purpose, but I prefer not to use it because the odor may come off on your hand as you handle the knife. If the knife were to come in direct contact with salt water, wash it off as soon as possible with tap water and apply the coating of oil.
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