1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Pre-Chilling The Stanley Beer-Growler

Discussion in 'Gadgets & Gear' started by oldmanron, Nov 5, 2018.

  1. oldmanron

    oldmanron

    165
    Jun 19, 2012
    Hi Guys,

    I used to teach Physics (just at the Junior High level), and yesterday I made an interesting (and useful) discovery.

    A few days ago I received a new Stanley Classic Growler in the mail, and was totally impressed with the design and construction and the details. About $70 Canadian with shipping included.

    Everybody knows that pre-chilling a thermal cold-stuff container will improve its performance ... doesn't matter if it's a $600 Yeti cooler or your kid's $4 foam-insulated little plastic screw-top container for the litter-free school-lunch fruit cocktail. The most common pre-chills are cold water or just storing the container in a freezer. But my modest home does not have a basement and ... so ... no roomy "deep freeze". Which means the modest fridge-top freezer compartment itself is usually full ...

    I tried the obvious option ... topped up the Stanley with coldest-possible tap water and let it sit overnight in the fridge compartment. Sixteen hours later the water was still "to my hand" almost the same cold temp ... meaning probably that the steel jug and its contents were all about "fridge temp" ... a good way to take it to the growler bar.

    But ... on a whim or maybe an intuitive hunch ... I emptied-out the cold water and put about 3/4 of a tray of loose ice cubes from the freezer into the jug. And stashed the jug in the fridge. Near the bottom. After two days I (just an hour ago) removed the growler and gave it a good shake ... expecting some sloshing.

    Nope. Nothing. I thumped it gently onto the wooden butcher block. It thumped like the door on my Bentley. Bank-vault solid ...

    WTF? I "uncorked" the simple-but-effective clamp-down lid and peered inside. Everything was frozen solid. Which meant that the interior temp and inner walls of the jug were as cold as the ice. Go figure. Optimum. I wonder what it was.

    Epiphany time. Just add some ice water (and a few cubes to maybe act as neutrons in a hydrogen fission reaction?) and give it a really hard marimba shake and dump the contents before entering the microbrewery of your choice.

    Which I'll try on my next beer run on Tuesday. Stay tuned. I might even buy a thermometer. I tried it. It works.

    Afternote - Google STANLEY GROWLER CERAMIVAC ... there's a new kid on the block. For another $30 you too can have the ultimate growler jug. Maybe just don't drop it. I was in elementary school from 1955 to 1961 ... and somehow managed to break every breakable Thermos vacuum bottle (made of silvered glass, I think) that came in the lunch boxes of that era. But I still have my last lunch box ... a vintage Zorro ... proudly displayed on a shelf in my mudroom.
     
  2. Danke42

    Danke42

    Feb 10, 2015
    Why not use some small ice chips and salt water? It'll cool to a lower temp and you will still be able to pour out the liquid when it's beer time.
     
  3. mete

    mete Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 10, 2003
    You broke all the glass liner Thermos bottles ? You're my hero ! I hated them. Then I became a metallurgist and realized that made me proud to be a metallurgist :thumbsup:

    The new ones are interesting . Steel about half thickness of the old type .High tech which on some you can see by looking inside - you can see the construction .Starting out with flat sheet of stainless steel , rolled into a cylinder and Laser welded ! :rolleyes:
     
  4. oldmanron

    oldmanron

    165
    Jun 19, 2012
    Hi Guys,

    I used to teach Physics (at the Junior High level), and yesterday I made an interesting (and useful) discovery.

    A few days ago I received a new Stanley Classic Growler in the mail, and was totally impressed with the design and construction and the details. About $70 (here in Canada) with shipping included.

    Everybody knows that pre-chilling a thermal cold-stuff container will improve its performance ... doesn't matter if it's a $600 Yeti cooler or your kid's $4 foam-insulated little plastic screw-top container for the litter-free school-lunch fruit cocktail. The most common pre-chills are cold water or just storing the container in a freezer. But my modest home does not have a basement and ... so ... no roomy "deep freeze". Which means the modest fridge-top freezer compartment itself is usually full ...

    I tried the obvious option ... topped up the Stanley with coldest-possible tap water and let it sit overnight in the fridge compartment. I took it out in the morning. Sixteen hours later the water was still "to my hand" almost the same cold temp ... meaning probably that the steel jug and its contents were all about "fridge temp" ... a good way to take it to the growler bar.

    But ... on a whim or maybe an intuitive hunch ... I emptied-out the cold water and put about 3/4 of a tray of loose ice cubes from the freezer into the jug. And stashed the jug in the fridge. Near the bottom. After two days I (just an hour ago) removed the growler and gave it a good shake ... expecting some sloshing.

    Nope. Nothing. I thumped it gently onto the wooden butcher block. It thumped like the door on my Bentley. Bank-vault solid ...

    WTF? I "uncorked" the simple-but-effective clamp-down lid and peered inside. Everything was frozen solid. Which meant that the interior temp and inner walls of the jug were as cold as the ice. Go figure. Optimum. I wondered.

    Epiphany time. Do it. Just add some ice water (and a few cubes to maybe act as neutrons in a hydrogen fission reaction?) and give it a really hard marimba shake and dump the contents before entering the microbrewery of your choice.

    Which I'll try on my next beer run. Stay tuned. I might even buy a thermometer.

    Afternote - Google STANLEY GROWLER CERAMIVAC ... there's a new kid on the block. For another $30 you too can have the ultimate growler jug. Maybe just don't drop it. I was in elementary school from 1955 to 1961 ... and somehow managed to break every breakable Thermos vacuum bottle (made of silvered glass, I think) that came in the lunch boxes of that era. But I still have my last lunch box ... a vintage Zorro ... proudly displayed on a shelf in my mudroom.
     
  5. Cougar Allen

    Cougar Allen Buccaneer (ret.) Platinum Member

    Oct 9, 1998
  6. oldmanron

    oldmanron

    165
    Jun 19, 2012
    Thank you ... I'd obviously forgotten that I'd already posted it. Second Senior's Moment of the week, and it's not even Friday ... :(

    Perhaps draining the growler contributed to my confusion/lapse ...
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018
  7. oldmanron

    oldmanron

    165
    Jun 19, 2012
    I'm a hero! Finally! Thank you. :)

    Worth mentioning ... I first made that post on the Gear Forum on CanadianGunNutz.com , and a couple of days later a member made a brief request, suggesting that an image would be welcome ...

    [​IMG] Originally Posted by legi0n [​IMG]
    show us the growler... next to the Bentley please [​IMG]

    My reply ...

    It's embarrassing to admit, but I've been on CGN for 10 years and still haven't "gotten around" to learning how to post photos. And there sure have been times when it would have been handy. However, it's easy enough to Google images of both of them. The Stanley growler is in a nice shade of navy blue, the same colour (not coincidentally) as the 10-year-old old coupe ... I wanted them to match. [​IMG]

    But this is a good time to mention an epiphany I had this morning. I live in the mountains near the BC - Alberta border, and (being a gear freak) I naturally carry lots of "just in case" stuff in my vehicle ... varying it by season ... snacks and tools and boots and lighting (with Lithium batteries during the winter) and bombproof clothing and a sleeping bag. When I got up this morning I noticed that it was winter, and I thought of another good use for that stellar Stanley. When it isn't being used in its primary role, it would seem to be a perfect way to ensure having an adequate water supply "if you're stuck on a back road and it's 40 below" ... (I'm quoting Ian Tyson here, introducing "Four Strong Winds" at a music festival 50 years ago.)

    I am guessing that a jug of hot water would easily stay unfrozen for two or three days ... especially if it's wrapped in an emergency parka or wool blanket. It could mostly remain in the vehicle for days ... just have to remember to regularly rotate-it-out/refresh-it before the water on it eventually freezes.

    Incidentally, Stanley sells great flannel and cotton twill shirts under their brand name ... and in Tall Sizes (Woot!) and all the way to 4XL ... I recently bought four of them at a local "clearance store" for $23 Canadian each ... regularly US$50 and $55 each!

    https://www.stanleyworkwear.com/collections/shirts

    EDIT: Actually, the car is for sale right now back in Ontario ...

    https://ca.cargurus.com/Cars/l-Used-...ting=213079079

    No tire kickers, please.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018
  8. oldmanron

    oldmanron

    165
    Jun 19, 2012
    Aha! Like making old-timey ice cream. Simply Saline! Good brainstorming. Obviously cooler than basic fridge temp ...
     

Share This Page