Recommendation? Re-profile a Glock Field Knife. What should be done?

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Dec 25, 2007
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Edge retention (as the ability to maintain its sharp apex) is solely related to steel type/hardness and edge angle/thickness. If the steel is too soft, it will not hold an edge too long because it will easily wear out. If the edge is tu acute/thin, then it may easily roll or chip, depending on the hardness and steel.

If with the stock edge people is complaining about poor edge retention (as the ability to maintain its sharp apex on the very edge), then it is because the steel is soft, and there is nothing you can do about it.

BUT the ability for a knife to CUT is not only due to edge retention, but also to the overall geometry profile of the knife. If the blade is tu thick and the grind to abrupt (such as the Glock field knife), the knife will not cut well (even if the edge is hair splitting sharp), because as soon as it starts to cut into the material, it will wedge itself into it. The Glock knife will never be a slicer no matter what you do (short of regrinding it to make it a full flat grind). Apples and potatoes will be split open, it will not carve wood well. Slicing cardboard would be a nightmare, for example. It will probably cut cord and meat fine, but not much else.


Mikel
Well...
Not that bad I would say...
 
Joined
Dec 25, 2007
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I've cut carpet into pieces with the Glock knife, without a problem.
It may not be the best slicer (obviously). But it definitely is able to cut up most things.
 
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Dec 25, 2007
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451
The Glock knife is cool and interesting. Probably usable for bushcraft, but not exactly ideal. The idea that a bushcraft knife needs to be really thick and beefy is a weird concept. Batoning is kind of a weird idea too. If you're camping or similar, won't you have a real axe or hatchet with you? Slamming wood against a small knife to force it through wood to split it seems like something you do for an experiment or in an emergency. For real splitting, use a hatchet or axe.

So if you're not trying to baton with this poor blade, it doesn't need to be crazy thick. ...and crazy thick is the opposite of what you want in a blade that CUTS. Thin is sharp. Sharp is thin. A reasonable thickness blade with a nice sharp edge is going to do all tasks better: Carving, feather sticks, cutting meat and veggies. Even slicing rope.

Again, the Glock is a neat knife. I might own one myself at some point. But something like a Mora or something else that's sturdy, but with a more normal geometry, is probably a better overall choice.

Just my 2 cents.

Brian.
Exactly my thoughts.
That's why the Mora is actually my favorite knife. Of all knife brands.
Low price, high performance.

I also like the Hultafors knives. Same reason.
The Glock knife is not a bad knife. Though I dislike the handle, too round , and sudden narrow part behind the guard.
The Mora is way more knife. The Glock is more of a bayonet kind of knife. Good for stabbing. And it cuts... sort of, ...not that great .
The longer Mora's like the 731 or 748MG are better slicers than a Glock knife as well. And the tip, don't stab the Glock knife into wood and then bend the knife sideways, for it will bend pretty easy. It might be tough, but the tip bends like an iron wire.
 
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Joined
Dec 25, 2007
Messages
451
Hi,
Its not comparable to corrugated cardboard, apple, potato ...
the wedging/binding ability of a sheet of paper , rolled up or not, is zero pounds
I do think also that the Glock is not the best choice for cutting. Aside from the video's being showed by me :eek:.
I personally prefer the Mora over the Glock, and not a bit either . Excellent low priced knife along with high performance.
"Less is more" still counts, also in these times.
Not that the Glock knife is expensive. But it's more of a bayonet... As is the M3 trench knife. It cuts also (at around 6 minutes), but wouldn''t be my preferred knife either..
 
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