Recommendations for a high end general knife sharpener

Joined
Dec 29, 2021
Messages
4
Ever since I purchased my first pocket knife, I got frustrated with the seemingly impossible task of returning the edge to its factory condition as the blade grew duller and duller and this issue has stopped me from adding more folders in my collection.

I've decided that I would like to overcome this issue by purchasing a high performance guided knife sharpener that will prove to be a lifetime investment for all my current and future knife sharpening needs.

I will mostly be using it to sharpen pocket knives and kitchen knifes. The possibility of sharpening Scissors and chisels/scrapers would prove to be a fantastic asset as well!

The ability to sharpen knives as small as 35 mm in length with a width of 8 mm up to knives of around 30 cm in blade length is a requirement as well as the ability to install a digital angle gauge which I already own.

There are so many good brands out there however, I've been mainly looking at TSPROF's Blitz series and their Kadet series but I'm not sure which one would be the better choice for my needs.

Feel free to recommend any other brands of similar price/quality.

I'm setting my budget to around 400$ give or take 50$.
 

sickpuppy1

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 27, 2018
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1,071
You’re right, many good systems out there. I’m just throw this out there. Two systems in the exchange area right now. One is a hapstone v7. Which is kinda like a edgepro setup. It has no stones but it’s only 125 so that gives money to get them. The other is a wicked edge. One has the pro pack 2 with it but is out of your price range. The other is further down and 550 with stones and shipping! Look at those and see what ya think.
 
Joined
Dec 29, 2021
Messages
4
You’re right, many good systems out there. I’m just throw this out there. Two systems in the exchange area right now. One is a hapstone v7. Which is kinda like a edgepro setup. It has no stones but it’s only 125 so that gives money to get them. The other is a wicked edge. One has the pro pack 2 with it but is out of your price range. The other is further down and 550 with stones and shipping! Look at those and see what ya think.
Thanks for the suggestions however I am only interested in brand new items.
 

Twindog

Gold Member
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Apr 6, 2004
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3,436
I love guided systems. I use a WickedEdge and have lots of stones and strops.

But honestly, you still have to know what you're doing. Even when I was a little kid, I could sharpen my slip joint on a oil stone. Maybe you should invest in your sharpening skills first, then go for an expensive system.

You could start with an 8-inch DMT diamond stone or two -- Xtra fine, fine, coarse, Xtra course. Decide what kind of angle you want -- say 15 or 20 degrees per side. Then put the stones on a ramp of that angle, using your angle guide. Hold the edge horizontal and sharpen until you get a burr the full length of each side of the edge. Switch sides from time to time so you don't over grind just one side.

Then remove the burr on each side, using short, light, edge-leading strokes.

Then learn to strop your sharp, clean edge for some extra pop.

Maybe you can throw in a microbevel to make future sharpening a lot faster. (See Sodak's sticky)

Those skills are pretty basic and easy to learn. Throw in a loupe and a Sharpie to paint the edge to help you see what your stone is doing, and you can become proficient fairly fast.

Then decide if you want to go with a full guided system.
 

000Robert

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Joined
Mar 28, 2020
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4,745
Wicked Edge WE130 all the way! I also have the Chisel and Scissor attachments. They work great! With the WE130 you can profile asymmetrical bevels as well.
 

777 Edge

Gold Member
Joined
Sep 16, 2019
Messages
328
Your best versatility and value for money combined with excellent quality, is the Hapstone R2 system.

I have just about all the sharpening systems available on the market, because I enjoy designing and making upgrades and add-ons for them and because I am obsessed with sharpening. Here are my top 3 choices of all the systems I have:

Hapstone R2
Kazak Pro Black
TSProf K03

The Kazak Pro Black is fast becoming my top contender as one of the best systems out there because of its build quality, its accessories and well thought-out design. That being said, you really can't go wrong with a Hapstone system. When it comes to the TSProf systems the K03 is excellent, but I would not go for the Kadet or Blitz if I were you.

The Kazak Pro Black also comes with a GREAT lighting system, which mounts on the vertical rod and makes your sharpening much clearer and more enjoyable.

All of these (and many more) are available in the U.S. from Gritomatic.
 
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Jason B.

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
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11,112
I have corrected many blades sharpened on Worksharp, edge pro, wicked edge, etc. As mentioned, none will make up for skill and knowledge.

And if your only example is a factory edge then that's a pretty poor example, just saying...

It's funny how just a few years ago most people scoffed at the thought of spending more than $50 for sharpening gear. Now, everyone thinks it takes hundreds or thousands to be able to sharpen, and hand sharpening is simply impossible. My how times have changed.
 

000Robert

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Mar 28, 2020
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I have corrected many blades sharpened on Worksharp, edge pro, wicked edge, etc. As mentioned, none will make up for skill and knowledge.

And if your only example is a factory edge then that's a pretty poor example, just saying...

It's funny how just a few years ago most people scoffed at the thought of spending more than $50 for sharpening gear. Now, everyone thinks it takes hundreds or thousands to be able to sharpen, and hand sharpening is simply impossible. My how times have changed.

I don't see how anyone could screw up with a Wicked Edge. It's about as simple as you can get. But I don't doubt you. Some people just don't want to do a little reading to learn how to do things properly.
 
Joined
Jun 29, 1999
Messages
7,987
I sharpen freehand, occasionally using an angle guide to re-establish a bevel when needed. A good set of diamond hones should last for decades. My Buck Honemaster angle guide is probably 40 years old and still works just fine.
 

Jason B.

Knifemaker / Craftsman / Service Provider
Joined
Jun 13, 2007
Messages
11,112
I don't see how anyone could screw up with a Wicked Edge. It's about as simple as you can get. But I don't doubt you. Some people just don't want to do a little reading to learn how to do things properly.
Take out Wicked Edge and replace those two words with literally anything and your sentence still makes sense.
 

3D Anvil

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Oct 4, 2021
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199
Take out Wicked Edge and replace those two words with literally anything and your sentence still makes sense.
Not really. For example, you can *know* how free hand sharpening is supposed to be done and still suck at it, because it takes practice and skill to put that knowledge to good use. It might take years of practice to get really good at it. In contrast, any noob who follows the instructions should be able to get a near-perfect edge the first time with a fixed-angle system, as long as they follow the instructions.
 
Joined
Jan 10, 2007
Messages
304
Try a Spyderco Sharpmaker.
^^^^this.
I use a Sharpmaker for touchup in my kitchen, and a second Sharpmaker (30 years old) in my mountain place. For profiling, or when I have a really dull edge, or buy something with a round edge, for 30 years I have used a 1" belt sander. I remove the platen for a slack belt convex edge. In two minutes I can produce a perfect edge with perfect sharpness. I can vary the angle and the grit for the use of the blade, slicer, general use, chisel, axe, lawn mower, pulaski, etc. Usually a 400 grit belt followed by a leather belt with green stick. The skill is easily learned, start on a cheap garage sale butcher knife, until you are confident. I have other tricks, such as grease or green stick on a worn out belt. Also, I can polish with a hard cotton buffing wheel and green stick. The whole setup is less than $100.

This is for user blades only. I don't touch the original edge of a handmade collector knife, to maintain its value. (But sometimes I do when the maker doesn't do it right, and my edge is an improvement.)
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2020
Messages
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+1 for WE for what you describe. Nothing is perfectly automatic as described above but I do think most anyone with basic motor skills and basic interest/experience in tinkering or fixing odds and ends should be able to get very decent results quickly. With a little more practice and bur removal/stropping you’ll be better than factory edge.

The only drawback is the natural arch of the arms don’t always match perfectly with certain tips or belly’s and will alter the edge/angle some.

I really like my WE. I don’t use the wicked edge as much now as I’m getting much better at freehand but it helped me understand the sharpening process much better and kept everything sharp along the way.
 

000Robert

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Joined
Mar 28, 2020
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4,745
+1 for WE for what you describe. Nothing is perfectly automatic as described above but I do think most anyone with basic motor skills and basic interest/experience in tinkering or fixing odds and ends should be able to get very decent results quickly. With a little more practice and bur removal/stropping you’ll be better than factory edge.

The only drawback is the natural arch of the arms don’t always match perfectly with certain tips or belly’s and will alter the edge/angle some.

I really like my WE. I don’t use the wicked edge as much now as I’m getting much better at freehand but it helped me understand the sharpening process much better and kept everything sharp along the way.

You just use the sharpie and adjust your blade forward or back in the clamp until the belly bevel matches the tip bevel.
 
Joined
Mar 13, 2017
Messages
54
I am looking for a new system as well. I have a Sharpmaker and I've done OK with it. Like a fool I let some one use one of my knives once. I dont know how, but this person managed to do considerable damage. Ive cleaned it up as much as possible, but I can't stomach carrying it in its current condition. Would a Wicked Edge be a viable system? Should I send it to someone? Or is this blade a complete lost cause now? Any system to avoid with coated blades? I very rarely use my knives so this would be a very occassional thing. Something that requires little skill upkeep would be great.
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2020
Messages
39
I am looking for a new system as well. I have a Sharpmaker and I've done OK with it. Like a fool I let some one use one of my knives once. I dont know how, but this person managed to do considerable damage. Ive cleaned it up as much as possible, but I can't stomach carrying it in its current condition. Would a Wicked Edge be a viable system? Should I send it to someone? Or is this blade a complete lost cause now? Any system to avoid with coated blades? I very rarely use my knives so this would be a very occassional thing. Something that requires little skill upkeep would be great.
Absolutely NOT a complete loss.

I would be bummed out by that damage/abuse too (that buddy wouldn’t be using my knife again) but yes you can repair stuff like that on a WE but your gonna want some low grit diamond (50&100grit) and some patience.

Or very CAREFULLY rough off some material with a bench grinder or belt sander WITHOUT adding too much heat or you’ll ruin the heat treat. Then you can set a new bevel with the WE and sharpen.

The first option with WE only should be somewhat beginner friendly if patient. If you add in power equipment it will be faster if done correctly but could go wrong quickly.

I’ll take it off your hands for a reasonable price before you toss it!
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2020
Messages
39
I am looking for a new system as well. I have a Sharpmaker and I've done OK with it. Like a fool I let some one use one of my knives once. I dont know how, but this person managed to do considerable damage. Ive cleaned it up as much as possible, but I can't stomach carrying it in its current condition. Would a Wicked Edge be a viable system? Should I send it to someone? Or is this blade a complete lost cause now? Any system to avoid with coated blades? I very rarely use my knives so this would be a very occassional thing. Something that requires little skill upkeep would be great.
Another option is go to Spydercos warranty and repair page. They offer this service for cheap:

• Re-profiling a chipped or damaged edge or broken serration teeth – Depending upon the condition of the blade, we may be able to re-profile or re-serrate the edge. If so, the fee is $20.00 plus $5.00 return shipping and handling. Spyderco does not replace knife blades under any circumstances.
 
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