The Beaver.....the knife that "crime" forgot

Joined
Feb 9, 2005
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It never ceases to amaze me where some of the ROS Arms knife designs originate.

The Beaver model (yeah I know laugh it up guys...lol) was taken from a prisoner at a top level prison who had been using it as a shank. One nice thing about some criminals is the can be so innovative.

The design of course is no longer crude but very stream lined and can act as self protection OR a wonderful skinner. It represents the original seized weapon very little, but it was born in a high level cell block.

What even amazes me more is that at LEAST two customers that I know well are prison guards themselves and were drawn to buy this blade having NO KNOWLEDGE of this, because I myself did not know the full story of this knife until Blade Show.

I guess deep down inside they just saw the raw functionality of the design.

Even MORE interesting, we had a prototype of what could be the "Beaver 2" notice I said COULD be.

A customer of ours reprofiled the whole knife as a gift and it was one of the most asked about knives on the table. It was not for sale but everyone picked it up and we had many offers for it. It even had a bottle opener on the end. I will have Vlad post pictures when he returns from overseas.

Just some info I thought you guys might like to know...the trivia of the day, if you will....:p
 
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Damn, John...if I'd have known you were going to sell me a shank, I could've gotten a local one for far less money. ;)

Interesting that it's based on a weapon. I purchased mine expecting a skinning and slicing knife and was surprised at how thick it was, and also at how the strange handle lent itself to different grips. Hearing that it's modelled after a weapon is not that surprising in retrospect.

I'm waiting to see the new one. Will it be thinner, or is it still ~ 5mm?
 
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I dont know for sure Dave....I spend most of my time trying to get the knives made thicker to keep up with customer demand.

If I turn around now and ask for thinner they are going to think I have finally lost it for good...lol

Seriously I think the Model 2 MIGHT be a little thinner, but I cannot promise anything at this point. I do know Russian and American hunters/trappers that swear by the model 1. It just depends on what kind of edge you like (angle/grind).

It still makes a hell of a defensive carry either way you slice it.
 
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Jun 23, 2006
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Aye. Right. seems like MOST production knives in Russia gets designed either by Spetsnaz or prisoners. Like NOKS.

P.S. Steel in Russian prison? in top level prison? - right after milk and cookies supper. I wonder what happened to correctional officer after he ADMITTED that knife was made right under his nose?
 
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I don't know about the Russian prisons, but in American ones even firearms have been made before. Inmate ingenuity never ceases to amaze me.

Last night while searching the laundry room we found two batons that had been constructed of cardboard and twine. Cardboard and twine. They were complete with handles and guards, and several full-power blows on a steel table did not damage them...and this is in a space where they're directly supervised at all times (theoretically, anyway) by personnel and cameras, and they still managed to construct and hide two batons. There was a welding rod in the same location. Where in the hell did that come from? And what were they planning on doing with it?

I've seen batons made in the past from notebook paper and linen. They weren't quite as durable but they still were effective. I could go on for quite some time about the nature of these weapons but it's probably not necessary. The point is, they have the time to figure out how to make innocent things into something else, and how to get things they need that aren't innocent in the first place.

These things are indeed made under our noses. Our staff to inmate ratio is about one to fifty. I personally supervise between 40-60 at a time. It would not be realistic to expect us to see and find everything.
 
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Feb 9, 2005
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Well certainly the prisoners in Russia are not granted copyrights or royalties. I have never seen the original and can neither confirm nor deny it was or was not constructed of steel.

What happened to the C/O?? Probably not much more than a reprimand, just like here. Parastroyka changed a lot.

As for Spetznaz, most of the Veterans I have had the privilege to know were more than capable of designing a great knife.

If it seems like a lot of semi custom knives from our line are designed by Spetznaz, that would be because a former Spetznaz Officer owns the majority of the company. Other forges I cannot answer for.

Dave perhaps you can explain the criminal process known as keistering. I dont think most understand these guys can keep one shiv for a long time and work on it. You are the expert there my friend, not I. And if American prisoners figure this one out, you can bet people in other prisons do to. Ladies and Gentleman, if he will be so kind.........Mr. Rishar (sorry we dont have a drum section)...
 
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Keistering is the practice of hiding something in one's backside. No further discussion is warranted here.

There are other ways to hide things. You can simply stick something in the dirt outside and step on it; if you need it later, you can bend down to pick up a dropped item or tie a shoe. If a search discovers it there's nothing linking it to you. If it's a Lexan shank, it will probably never be found and will still be like new years later.

Electrical panels, light panels, and windows and such are held in place with security hexhead screws...you know, the kinds with the post in the middle so standard tools won't work? They've figured out how to remove (and reinstall) these with stuff that's not only available to them, but is so necessary that we can't take it away. The smarter ones hide their good stuff in the light panels.

(And no, I will not discuss how this is done because it seems that not everyone knows how to do it yet and spreading this knowledge endangers me. Trust me, though, it's surprisingly easy.)

A remarkably effective trick that the more clever ones use is to simply give us something to find. When we kick a cell or a unit in it's generally because we're looking for something specific and they know that we're not going to leave empty-handed. So, they leave little things (tobacco, pornography, unauthorized writing tools, etc.) that will get them in little or no trouble, but will give us a feeling that there's nothing else to find. Granted if the search is being done properly and methodically this shouldn't work, but not every search is done properly and methodically, and they know that.

Last but not least, we work a few shifts a week there. They live there. No one knows your home as well as you do, right?

You would not believe some of the crap we find during even routine searches, and some of the things that are turned into weapons.
 
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