1. Click here to enter the drawing for your chance to win an Ontario Knives Spec Plus SP8 Machete Survival Knife & Ka-Bar Dozier Folding Hunter, , Bladeforums.com swag or memberships!

    Be sure to read the rules before entering, then help us decide next week's giveaway by hitting the poll in that thread! Entries close at midnight, Saturday Sept 7!

    Once the entries close, we'll live stream the drawing on Sunday, Sept 8 at 5PM Eastern. Tune in to our YouTube channel TheRealBladeForums for a chance to win bonus prizes!

    Questions? Comments? Post in the discussion thread here

The Great Divide: Felling and Bucking Wedge Thread

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by ithinkverydeeply, Aug 19, 2019.

  1. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    [​IMG]
    I’ve seen discussion on splitting wedges but no dedicated thread on felling and bucking wedges. Does anyone get into vintage wedges? These are some of my favorites!

    The little 1lb bolt pattern wedge is a Hubbard and the other small one is an Occident from Seattle Hardware. [​IMG]
    The two grey ones in front are magnesium not aluminum. They were only produced during a relatively short period between 1935-55. They are super light for their size. They seem even lighter than aluminum.the larger of these two is almost 10” long and barely over a pound.[​IMG] [​IMG] The two likely blacksmith made wedges would probably be attached to each other with a rope so they could be packed easier and slung over something like your shoulder. They are about 6lb each [​IMG] The big wide ones, are these for bucking and not felling or are they just giant and wide?
    The massive Titan 10lb wedge is 13” x 7”, and the 7lb Skookum is 10” x 7”.[​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] And the enormous felling wedges are a 8lb Acme that is in amazing condition with original paint and a barely hammered on poll is 17.5” long, and the mammoth sized felling wedge is unmarked but it is 21” long and about 13.5 pounds.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    (Funny that last picture makes the 8lb Acme look longer than the 21” one, but it is not, it is 4” shorter and diminutive in stature compared to the 13.5lb wedge.)

    I’d like to learn more about these. The timeline that they went from steel, to magnesium, to aluminum, and finally plastic. I’d also like to discover what brand used the circle with an “I” in it?
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2019
  2. rjdankert

    rjdankert Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    I think the older wedges are pretty neat. I haven't gone out of my way to get them, but these came along and I couldn't resist:

    [​IMG]



    Bob
     
    Dusty One, garry3, Square_peg and 9 others like this.
  3. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    Cool Bob, Do you know what company the W.A & T Co. is?
     
    muleman77, Meek1, Fmont and 3 others like this.
  4. rjdankert

    rjdankert Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    Warren Axe & Tool


    Bob
     
  5. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    Of
    Of course. Thanks.
     
    Yankee Josh, muleman77, Meek1 and 3 others like this.
  6. rjdankert

    rjdankert Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    W A & T Co 1937 catalog snip:

    [​IMG]


    Bob
     
  7. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    And like the middle school kid that dreads gym day, here is my first submission... lol
    [​IMG]
     
    garry3, Square_peg, muleman77 and 8 others like this.
  8. Yankee Josh

    Yankee Josh Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 31, 2018
    Great thread! I've always looked for falling wedges while out and about. But while there is (or was) a lot of axes to find around here there's not much else in the way of old logging tools. So I appreciate the pics so I can collect vicariously through you guys! At least I learn what I'm looking for. Those are some gorgeous falling wedges guys! I think a wedge might be a great thing to try making first once I get some sort of forge made. Can't wait to see other additions!
     
    garry3, muleman77, Miller '72 and 4 others like this.
  9. A17

    A17

    959
    Jan 9, 2018
    I passed up on broad axe heads, a froe, a beautiful Plumb cruiser that will haunt my dreams for years to come, and many felling wedges as "we're gonna see an even bigger antique store tomorrow!". We never did. But, a wedge or two has still come into my life.
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  10. A17

    A17

    959
    Jan 9, 2018
    Ps. I find the title funny as where I live is called The Divide and it's not so great, and splitting wedges are the norm up here.
     
    Trailsawyer, Meek1, Fmont and 3 others like this.
  11. Miller '72

    Miller '72 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 25, 2017
    Middle school gym class was ok...high school gym with the mandatory week of square dancing...why!?:D:(:confused:

    Wedges from the East Coast:cool:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I have found these three in the past two years.
    Splitting wedges, you cant walk into a yard or garage without finding 3 of those:D
     
    Dusty One, garry3, rjdankert and 8 others like this.
  12. Meek1

    Meek1

    172
    Aug 11, 2019
    Oh great, so now I'm going to pick up another obsession. Thanks guys. Those are awesome!
     
    garry3, Yankee Josh, Fmont and 4 others like this.
  13. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    I had erased the square dancing from my memory. LoL
     
  14. muleman77

    muleman77

    412
    Jan 24, 2015
    A lot of those with the holes in the side, are hanging wedges. Used in pairs tied together, with the grain, across a kerf while bucking, to keep things from rolling too soon.

    The cord between can be hooked on a limb, or an axe chop on the solid side, to keep ahold them once knocked out to turn things loose.

    I have made a couple pairs, don't have any vintage ones....
     
  15. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    That Dodge Ball are tooooo risky nowadays ;)
     
    garry3, Yankee Josh, Fmont and 4 others like this.
  16. Miller '72

    Miller '72 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 25, 2017
    Thanks @muleman77

    I remember reading or watching about the hanging wedges used across the kerf when bucking.
    A great reminder for me, thanks man.
     
    garry3, Yankee Josh, Fmont and 4 others like this.
  17. Miller '72

    Miller '72 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 25, 2017
    I wish i could...:confused::eek::rolleyes:

    Tell you what, square dancing my freshmen year left a mark lol!
    We did not have a choice in partner for the week and mine would be...the girlfriend of this not so pleasant senior.
    He and his sidekick met me the next morning at my locker, jacked me right up out of now where. I never had a chance the pricks.
    I survived.
    I dont square dance.
    Similar to algebra, though a class i NEVER got beat up for, I have never had to employ my learned square dance technique :mad::eek:
     
    Yankee Josh, Meek1, Fmont and 2 others like this.
  18. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    Miller, I never got to learn square dancing. That's something I thought I would like.
    You guys have some interesting wedges. I just always used the same wedges for everything. Which is mostly splitting and felling. They really
    come in handy when bucking up a large tree trunk. Thanks for this topic. DM
     
    Fmont, garry3, A17 and 5 others like this.
  19. Miller '72

    Miller '72 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 25, 2017
    Thanks Dave, your splitting of the hardest oak known to man, i dont think anyone needs to tell you this.
    I think wedges are an essential tool, perhaps not every situation calls for the need, but if you dont have the wedge with you...you will need it.

    Square dancing was fun and would be fun today, but not to many people break out into square dancing here anymore. Of course i dont go out dancing so how would i really know lol!
     
  20. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    I didn't know there were so many different wedges for different uses. That's one reason I enjoy this Forum as I learn so much. I'm mostly a grunt wood cutter, get it split and into the barn. So, we can heat our home. Whereas some men on here do so much more duties than just cutting fire wood. Thus, the need for different tools is impressive.
    There is a group of square dancers that meet not far away and I may attend to learn the steps. Thanks, DM
     
    Fmont, AaronGP, A17 and 4 others like this.

Share This Page