The situation in Nepal?

Joined
Sep 4, 2002
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77
Though this is, I believe, my first post on BladeForums.com, I have been a ghost on this server for quite a while, and have spent a lot of time searching through the old posts, looking up the various bits of information I wanted or needed as the questions popped into my head. I have learned a lot, thanks to this forum and its members. Though I used to be quite a regular on thefiringline.com, I don't post on forums too much these days, but I feel it is time for me to speak out. First of all, I know it has been a while, and I don't wish to open old wounds, but it was only a couple of weeks ago that I read about the passing of Uncle Bill Martino. I had shortly before that spent quite a lot of time reading the FAQ's on the HI website, and became immensely impressed with the man, his life, his service in the Peace Corps, and with his service to the people of Nepal. I was so inspired by what I read that I found myself drifting to websites devoted to the Nepali language and have even considered joining the Peace Corps, but more on that later... I wish to voice the pain I felt upon learning of the passing of such a great man. I am truly sorry for his loss. He was the kind of man I would have liked to have known in life, and hope to meet in the next world. I am glad that, at least, there is some legacy of his life to be found on this board. Though it saddened me to learn of his loss, I am glad that I was given the opportunity to know him at least in the limited capacity of one who has read his legacy... As I mentioned earlier, I have spent a bit of time learning more about the Peace Corps and Nepal, but yesterday I read the fine print and found out that the two don't mix anymore. Being, I suppose pathetically, kept up to date on news only like the average American, I really had no Idea that there was a communist revolution going on in Nepal. The Peace Corps has pulled out and according to my reading, travel to many areas, including Katmandu is advised against. I had no Idea that there was this level of political turmoil in the country. I myself am torn. From what I have read, I have grown fond of the people of Nepal. They seem proud without being arrogant, strong, yet internally at peace. The thought of a Communist/Marxist Nepal turns my stomach, but on the other hand I can understand why the people are joining this revolution, they have nothing. The people are poor and have little or no chance of changing their situation. The whole situation doesn't sit well with me. I was hoping one of you can give me some your views on the current situation, and maybe share some bit of news that has not reached my ears which will abate my unease.

Dhanyabad
Jeremiah
 
Joined
May 18, 1999
Messages
15,393
Well written and well said Jeremiah!:thumbup: :)

Welcome to the Cantina/Psycho Ward and the HI Forum!!!!:thumbup: :D

You may have already read the latest news on Nepal since you've run the search on BFC. If you haven't ran the search for the posts you are seeking in the Cantina you might want to do that as there have been a few stories fairly recently here in the forum.
Some of the other guys are a helluva lot more knowledgable and up to date on Nepali happenings than I am so I will defer to them and their excellent reporting.
Again, welcome aboard!:thumbup: :D
 
Joined
Nov 29, 2005
Messages
462
The big issue in Nepal from where I sit isnt the Maoists, they have signed a treaty witht the 7 main political parties promising to keep to a free multi-party democracy. The real threat to Nepali freedom is the king who has siezed totalitarian power. This absolut monarchy has abolished freedom of speech and freedom of assembly. Just yesterday royalist police opned fire on a group of portestors. It is a travesty that a consitutional monarchy can turn itself into an absolut one withhout an outcry from the international community. While the maoists have been attacking the army and police stations they have made promises reguarding insuring democracy. The Monarchy poses the real danger to Nepali freedom.

Gord
 

Howard Wallace

.
Moderator
Joined
Feb 23, 1999
Messages
4,816
Jeremiah,

Your post is one of the most moving tributes to my friend Bill Martino that I have read. Would you consider reposting it in the tribute thread also? That one always stays at the top of the other forum.
http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/showthread.php?t=340754
If you do, you can note that your questions are being addressed in another (this) thread.

It's been many decades since I've been to Nepal. With your current research, I'm pretty sure you're more up to date on the situation there than I am, so I don't have any facts for you.

Bill was in the Peace Corps for just a short time. He did most of his good work as a private individual. At first he didn't know just what to do, but he was looking for a way to help. Then after some thought and searching he found a way.

It is evident from your post you have now an insight into the "business" of HI. Kami Sherpa and Yangdu are continuing the good work in the ways they can. Each of us has something to offer. The puzzle for each of us is to discover what it is.

Good luck to you in your search for discovery.

Namaste.
 
Joined
Jul 10, 2003
Messages
1,601
Bullfrog,

Welcome home.

I dont' know much about these politics, many will tell you I don't know much about much, and thats true too.

But I can welcome you home, you can sit next to me, and I'll help protect ya until you get a bit more seasoned with the ways of the crew.

Just watch out for that guy in the corner, he spits and doesn't often hit the spittoon...
 
Joined
Mar 22, 2002
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15,742
Welcome.
I'm beginning to think Nepal will be a hot kettle for the rest of my lifetime at least.



munk
 
Joined
Aug 23, 2004
Messages
1,499
It's a pretty bad situation over there. The king has become a dictator. The maoists retaliate. People still can, and do, travel there. Last I checked, the Katmandu valley is still relatively free of violence. Lucky for us, because BirGorkha is in the Katmandu valley if I remember correctly. And so far, none of the Nepali factions seem to have much beef against Americans. The maoists haven't gotten involved with foreigners (that I'm aware of), and neither has the king. But both sides have bloody hands in this conflict. I hope that this country to which we have all come to feel so closely connected may find the peace it deserves.

Chris
 
Joined
Sep 4, 2002
Messages
77
Thank you, Yvsa, 45-70, and everyone. You truly know how to make a fellow feel welcome.

Howard Wallace: thank you for your kind words. I was not sure how it would be received so late in the game, but I felt it needed to be said. I will gladly re-post at the provided link. Also, I do remember reading that Uncle Bill was only in the Peace Corps for a short time, left for health reasons if I remember correctly, but I was hoping to go that route myself rather then as a private citizen. As that is an impossibility at this time, I think I will occupy myself by trying to better understand the situation, learn more about the culture, and a bit more of the language so that some day I may find another way to help. I also have my mind set to pick up an M43 with a horn handle, but maybe that is for another post…
Thank you Grob and others for the update on the political turmoil. I did not know that the monarchy was a large source of the problem. This is even worse news in my mind, though I am glad to hear that visiting Nepal is not an impossibility. I hope things will settle down soon. I don't wish the portent of munk to become true, yet progress is usually slow where nations are involved, and unless the world smells money or power up for grabs, I fear the international community will continue to turn the other cheek on this situation

Thank you all again

Dhanyabad
Jeremiah
 

not2sharp

Gold Member
Joined
Jun 29, 1999
Messages
18,268
The people are poor and have little or no chance of changing their situation.

The lack of material wealth does not neccessarily make you poor. As long as you have access to basic needs, and share relative opportunity within your community, you are simply an average citizen within that community. The Jones have no more then you do, so you have no problem keeping up with the Jones. So why would you want to change that?

Unfortunately, those who lack material wealth are easier to influence with wealth, and there are probably outsiders; such as communist interests in India and China, which are inciting the political struggle within Nepal. What happens in Nepal will depend on what happens to their neighbors.

n2s
 
Joined
Sep 4, 2002
Messages
77
"The lack of material wealth does not neccessarily make you poor"

Touché: I am just now starting to understand this fact.

"those who lack material wealth are easier to influence with wealth"

Too true. Good points.

Dhanyabad
Jeremiah
 
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