Unusual knife!!!

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by Alan oliver, Jul 1, 2020.

  1. Alan oliver

    Alan oliver

    5
    Jul 1, 2020
    Hi there, completely new here but trying to find out some information about my grandads knife, it’s been passed through our family but we’ve never been able to find out any information about it. We believe he served in the royal fusileers in Egypt but that’s about as far as our knowledge goes. There’s an old story floating around that it was designed to bend through the ribs in order to snap them? Thanks in advance.

    Alan
    [​IMG]

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    Last edited: Jul 1, 2020
    DocJD likes this.
  2. Planterz

    Planterz Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 26, 2004
    Pictures dude, pictures.
     
    OrangeBlueOrangeBlue likes this.
  3. Alan oliver

    Alan oliver

    5
    Jul 1, 2020
    Sorry iam trying!!
     
  4. Alan oliver

    Alan oliver

    5
    Jul 1, 2020
    [​IMG]
     
  5. Plainsman

    Plainsman

    841
    Apr 5, 1999
    You might try posting them on imgur and grabbing a link from there.
     
  6. Alan oliver

    Alan oliver

    5
    Jul 1, 2020
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Kmikaz3

    Kmikaz3 Basic Member Basic Member

    287
    Aug 28, 2019
    Your link MUST have an included .jpg something similar in order to work here.
     
  8. BladeScout

    BladeScout

    May 16, 2010
    Welcome
    As others have stated, use for example the photo host 'imgur.' Its quick and easy.
    In the meantime; Royal Fusiliers serving in Egypt were issued a bayonet but not a fixed blade knife AFAIK. This is the type of bayonet to have been issued to the Royal Fusiliers, when they were present in Egypt. Its the bayonet for the standard British SMLE (Short Magazine Lee Enfield) rifle. It was designed to be able to reach vitals without snapping (the blade). To the best of my knowledge, no bayonet has ever been designed to 'bend through ribs in order to snap them.'



    Royal Fusiliers.
    The 2nd Battalion landed at Galiipoli as part of the 86th Brigade in the 29th Division in April 1915; after being evacuated in December 1915, it moved to Egypt in March 1916 and then landed in Marseille in March 1916 for service on the Western Front;[54] major engagements involving the battalion included the Battle of the Somme in autumn 1916 and the Battle of Arras in spring 1917.[55]

    The 3rd Battalion landed at Le Havre as part of the 85th Brigade in the 28th Division in January 1915; major engagements involving the battalion included the Second Battle of Ypres in April 1915 and the Battle of Loos in September 1915.[55] The battalion moved to Egypt in October 1915 and then to Salonika in July 1918,[54] before returning to the Western Front. The 3rd Battalion was disbanded in 1922.[56]
    -Wiki
     
    Last edited: Jul 1, 2020
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  9. evilgreg

    evilgreg Why so serious? Gold Member

    Dec 25, 2012
    [​IMG]
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  10. BladeScout

    BladeScout

    May 16, 2010
    Ohh, dear....
    Looks like somebody saw a Kris but got the concept wrong.
     
  11. rexromic

    rexromic Gold Member Gold Member

    May 28, 2011
    Few unusual ones..
     

    Attached Files:

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  12. anthonycastorena2014

    anthonycastorena2014 Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 27, 2014
    Is it just me or does that kind of look like it was run over by a fork lift?
     
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  13. KenHash

    KenHash

    Sep 11, 2014
    "Bent blade designed to bend through ribs..."
    I'll have to remember that one....LOL
    Looks to me like a WWII era theater knife with cast aluminum handle.
    Sort of like this one:
    [​IMG]
     
  14. unwisefool

    unwisefool Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 22, 2007
    Lol yeah that knife just got bent, it was not designed that way. Your grandfather most likely kept it as a souvenir and had a funny or interesting story to go along with it.

    Also, do you have any idea how hard it would be to try and stab a knife like that in exactly the right place inside a man who was actively trying to kill you at the time?
     
  15. Sonnydaze

    Sonnydaze Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 6, 2009
    A straight blade can slide between the ribs just fine...it does make a difference just WHERE the point of the blade makes contact...
    I don't see that your crooked-blade pic would enable any thing in particular.
    Funny shot, though.
     
  16. Boombats

    Boombats

    148
    Mar 21, 2010
    Hahahaha did your grandad try to stab Superman?
     
  17. DocJD

    DocJD

    Jan 29, 2016
    :) Welcome !

    The family heirloom bayonet is very cool and should be treasured . :cool::thumbsup:

    But , just "NO" about that shape being better in any way as a weapon . :(

    Probably got run over by a tank or something ? :confused:
     
    anthonycastorena2014 likes this.
  18. Alan oliver

    Alan oliver

    5
    Jul 1, 2020
    Thankyou All for taking the time to reply! Your views have been very helpful, I guess that the knife getting driven over does seem like the most logical explanation and I guess that’s what prompted the story of it being designed to go through ribs if that’s the case it’s comforting to think that even at war he still managed to have a laugh and a joke with he’s friends and kept the story going when he brought it home.
     
  19. Zulus

    Zulus

    382
    May 29, 2020
    Somebody bent it.
    Re-bend it :^D
     
  20. abcdef

    abcdef

    Oct 28, 2005
    Put it in a brownie baking pan to get more edges.
     

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