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First benchmade

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by Cowboyfromhell666, Jul 18, 2019.

  1. colin.p

    colin.p

    732
    Feb 4, 2017
    Unfortunately, some believe in freedom of choice as long as "your choice" coincides with their choice and they will be quite vocal about it unless you agree with them.

    Benchmade's are like a well aged fine wine, very good, unless you don't happen to like wine. Like 'em or leave 'em I say.
     
    BenchCo Spydermade likes this.
  2. Whitedog

    Whitedog

    863
    Dec 30, 2005
    Some POSTIVE post for a change.
     
  3. teddy1093

    teddy1093 Gold Member Gold Member

    168
    May 12, 2017
    image.jpg 940 was the first
     
    colin.p likes this.
  4. Babyboomer

    Babyboomer Gold Member Gold Member

    207
    Nov 25, 2017
    Yup, my first Benchmade was (is) a 940, and I now have 2 - both dealer exclusives. I keep meaning to get the standard set: 940, 940-1, 940-2 and 943, but I got distracted by Griptilians, Nakamuras, Valets, Presidio 2s, Bugouts, etc., etc.
     
    colin.p likes this.
  5. midnight flyer

    midnight flyer Basic Member Basic Member

    Jan 12, 2009
    Hey cfh666... I think you're being wrongheaded about your purchase. Regardless of what product you buy these days, where it's made, who makes it, there there are problems with the products. And here on BF it seems that many are hypercritical and have raised an impossible bar to be reached with every single manufactured product.

    Back in the 50s, 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s most of us saw our knives as useful cutlery. Folks like me used them for work, when hunting, when fishing, hiking, a little food prep as needed, emergency utensil when barbecuing, etc, etc.

    In our ignorance we didn't know we had to have the newest, greatest Steel that was available. We didn't know about scales as the only choices we had were leather, wood, and Bone along with some nonsense called Delrin. We happily used our knives until they were dull and then simply sharpen them and put a drop of oil on the joints. When they were dull again, we did the same thing. Most of us bought our knives based on design / utility value for the task at hand, and the amount of funds available for purchase. We simply didn't know any better.

    Now when you buy a knife that you use to open Federal Express boxes, cut limes for your margaritas, cut a loose thread on your shirt, open up Christmas or birthday package or occasionally find an excuse to use it outside the cut a vine or something of that nature it has high expectations to be met.

    Folks now test the Rockwell hardness of their individual blades with breathless anticipation of finding out how hard it actually is. They fiddle and fuss over their blades to see if they get a rust spot from use. Panicky posts ensue if a sign of use appears on their blades. Should they send it back to the manufacturer? Should they send it in for spa treatment? Did they get screwed? Or should they man up and just power through it and wipe the rust off with a Flitz cloth? The group here will help them decide what to do with their knife and how to get through those treacherous times.

    I am glad we did not know that a blade being 2-1000ths of an inch off center was unacceptable and could be cause for panic. I appreciate the fact the if one of the scales on my new knife was just a little proud that I could simply take a piece of sandpaper to it right on the spot and be done with it. I liked the fact ( and still do! ) that I did not have to perform routine maintenance on any of my knives. Haven't seen the last 55 years of my blue color days. To this day, if a knife is really dirty from tar, construction adhesive, butyl caulk and the like I clean it with charcoal lighter fluid. Even if I have to soak it and then rub it all off the next day and then blast it with brake cleaner I simply don't take them apart. I have other things to do with my evenings then to take my knives apart and get the lint out of them.

    So for me, if I was you waiting with anticipation for a new piece of cutlery I wouldn't run the experience by overthinking it. When the knife comes rather than to get out you're micrometers, your Rockwell test equipment, buy a hank of rope and see how many test cuts you get before it dulls, before you take it all apart to make sure that it was assembled and oil to correctly before use, give it a chance.

    Hold the knife in your hand. Does it feel good? Will it be comfortable in use? Are the grinds pretty even? No burn spots on the cutting edge? Does it grind when you open it? Does it lock properly? Does it feel good in the pocket?

    No doubt you can find something wrong with any knife. Only the most devoted fan boys feel like they received an absolutely perfect specimen of a manufactured product. Don't lose out on the joy of a new knife!
    If it does what it's supposed to do and you like it the rest is just outside noise. Put it in your pocket and use it!

    Robert
     
    CanadaKnifeGuy and colin.p like this.
  6. Whitedog

    Whitedog

    863
    Dec 30, 2005
    How true
     
  7. Cowboyfromhell666

    Cowboyfromhell666

    36
    May 13, 2019
    I'm just saying for this kind of money I expect 3 things...flawless action, perfect blade centering, Razer sharp.....not too tall of an order. Will see tomorrow...
     
    4mer_FMF likes this.
  8. 4mer_FMF

    4mer_FMF Basic Member Basic Member

    Jun 9, 2016
    Cowboy, I hope your 940 blows you away!

    To add some context to what I posted in another thread, I’ve had QC issues with Spyderco and (*gasp*) even Chris Reeve as well as Benchmade. I have high standards too and sometimes forget that in the right context, a livable flaw doesn’t mean it’s not a good knife. Of course “livable” is quite subjective and usually varies with price!

    The 940 is a classic for good reason. I hope your introduction to the brand is a good one! Let us know how it goes!
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2019
    colin.p likes this.
  9. Apalachicola

    Apalachicola

    37
    Jun 24, 2019
    I usually have to clean and lubricate new knives before the action gets where I like it. Those 940s break in fast, however. Seems like most of the axis locks do. Take it apart, clean it and lube the pivot when you get it and you’ll be fine.
     
  10. Cowboyfromhell666

    Cowboyfromhell666

    36
    May 13, 2019
    Update....knife was delivered this morning about 8 hrs ago. First let me say the BLUE box with foam padding and velvet pouch were very nice. Then I picked her up and closely inspected the new knife. The aluminum handles had a velvet feel to them with nary a mark on it. My thumb flipped open the shiny new s30v steel. The blade shape is indeed a thing of beauty. I actuate the two tabs effortlessly and the perfectly balanced blade swiftly swung shut. The closing detent is very nice too by the way. The blades even grind was perfect and hair shaving sharp. Centering was 100% . The action on the axis lock is buttery smooth and feels like a knife already broken in. The stock clip will do for now until the deep carry clip arrives in a couple days. I'm really digging the anodized purple back spacer, a nice touch. The knife slides in and out of my pocket with ease and I barely notice its there. I am very impressed with my first BENCHMADE!! I am glad I got a good one on the first try and I hope this knife serves me well for the rest of my life.
     

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