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Knives with no metal?

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by Houlahound, Aug 31, 2019.

  1. Houlahound

    Houlahound

    317
    Aug 2, 2017
  2. GIRLYmann

    GIRLYmann

    Nov 7, 2005
    Rykjeklut likes this.
  3. abcdef

    abcdef

    Oct 28, 2005
    Seems to me metal is the way to go, at least until the next evolution in cutting implements. Maybe light pocket knives or fixed blades under 4". I don't think light sabers will ever be practical due to size restrictions, except maybe for military use.
     
  4. Rykjeklut

    Rykjeklut Basic Member Basic Member

    May 23, 2018
    My mum has a ceramic kitchen knife that she's apparently very pleased with.

    I swear there was someone a while back who said that he EDCs a ceramic knife, because metal detectors and such.
     
  5. Legendary_Jarl

    Legendary_Jarl

    485
    Feb 8, 2010
    [​IMG]
    The only one I got is the FGX boot knife. It surprised me how very well made it is.

    If you're curious about crazy non-metal knives you should check out kiwami japan:



     
  6. Kitchen knives are one of the best applications for ceramic blades. As long as you don’t try chopping bone, ceramic will keep a keen edge for a long time, won’t corrode, and won’t promote oxidation of food.
     
    Lance Leon likes this.
  7. James Y

    James Y

    Feb 18, 1999
    Many years back, there we’re some ceramic-bladed folding knives that came out. The blades were touted as holding an edge much longer than steel and being corrosion-proof. One of the problems was that they were also brittle.

    Jim
     
    afishhunter likes this.
  8. gazz98

    gazz98 Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 3, 2008
    I have a few ceramic knives in the kitchen. Work just fine. I can't imagine carrying a folder with no metal in it during the day.
     
  9. khopesh

    khopesh Gold Member Gold Member

    109
    Jun 23, 2018
    I have a Boker ceramic folder that I got some time back (20+ years). Handle is plastic and not very nice. Liners are medal. Not sure if it would pass medal detectors. It a interesting knife the carried for while but I was always worried about it being brittle. Never got to a point that it needed to be sharpened. It held a edge very well.

    DCC73AAC-9CA1-44ED-97A9-45E187F998D4.jpeg
     
  10. drail

    drail

    367
    Feb 23, 2008
    It's comical how humans started out with edges chipped from a rock and then spent a thousand years developing the amazing steels we have today - and yet some people want to go back to using a sharp rock.......
     
  11. DocJD

    DocJD

    Jan 29, 2016
    It's kinda sad , but knife sharpening seems to be nearly a lost art for many people now . That's the main value of ceramic blades , IMO .

    They can be very sharp and hold that edge for a long time , just in mild kitchen use . But they are brittle . Totally "stainless" , also . ;)
     
  12. JD Mandrell

    JD Mandrell Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 20, 2001
    I bought a little folding "fruit knife" in a kitchen store on clearance for a dollar, with a ceramic blade. Wicked sharp little sucker, and the best firesteel scraper I've ever had.
     
    Natlek likes this.
  13. tiguy7

    tiguy7 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 25, 2008
    I have many ceramic knives fixed and folding. Most are used in and around the kitchen. They make great finishing steels for metal knives.
     
  14. Korean Hog

    Korean Hog Gold Member Gold Member

    647
    Mar 12, 2017
    Knives with no metal?
    Like dehydrated water?
    Nah jk jk :D
    They seem to work for a lot of people but the idea of them being really brittle always kept me away.
     
  15. DocJD

    DocJD

    Jan 29, 2016
    :) Please elaborate ! I don't know what you mean ? :confused:
     
  16. tiguy7

    tiguy7 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 25, 2008
    9CA40C4E-4D07-4947-8914-8B2EA0D62F25.jpeg Here I am setting up the micro edge on a ZDP-189 folding knife utilizing the flat sides of Zirconium Carbide ceramic blade (edge leading).
     
    DocJD and Korean Hog like this.
  17. Korean Hog

    Korean Hog Gold Member Gold Member

    647
    Mar 12, 2017
    This might be a reason to try a ceramic blade. If I hate it, worst case I have a new sharpener to finish edges on.
     
    DocJD likes this.
  18. Lance Leon

    Lance Leon Gold Member Gold Member

    702
    May 3, 2017
    My mother has a couple ceramic kitchen knives. They out perform steel kitchen knives (the generic ones you would find at an equivalent price in a store) in almost every area - they come really sharp, can stay 'sharp enough' for years, and don't rust. The only downside is that they tend to chip if one isn't careful.

    I'm not sure if they can be sharpened, but honestly most generic ceramic kitchen knives are cheap enough that it's not an issue to just buy another when you've worn out or broken one.
     
    DocJD likes this.
  19. DocJD

    DocJD

    Jan 29, 2016
    IIRC they can be sharpened with diamond type sharpeners , but I've not yet needed to . As you say , cheap enough to be replaced as necessary . :):thumbsup:
     
  20. Houlahound

    Houlahound

    317
    Aug 2, 2017
    If they are that brittle I am surprised if a professional kitchen would use them and risk a customer catching a fragment in their meal.
     

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