Old Historical knives (title edited)

Discussion in 'Traditional Folders and Fixed Blades' started by cbach8tw, Mar 21, 2020.

  1. cbach8tw

    cbach8tw Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 9, 2006
    I edited the title to read Old Historical knives, knives from early part of our history and formative years. It can be old knives and modern interpretations of of those knives too. Fixed or folders, just not modern tactical. If it looks like it would be on the belt of a Revolutionary or Civil War soldier, long hunter, mountain man or fur trader, cowboy, Indian, or homesteader, etc.....that is what I am after.
     
    Old Hunter likes this.
  2. Jack Black

    Jack Black Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 2, 2005
    Thanks for the kind words Charlie, it's interesting to see that one :) I remember some years ago, going over to Sheffield to scour the antique shops, and the only knife I found all day was German (Gustav Emilern)! :D :thumbsup:

    [​IMG]
     
  3. cbach8tw

    cbach8tw Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 9, 2006
    Cool knife. I think it is neat that you were looking for English stuff and found a German knife.
     
  4. cbach8tw

    cbach8tw Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 9, 2006
    If you do not have the actual knife, but have photos, drawings, etchings or paintings of some old edged items that will work too. Maybe old catalogs, etc. I really like some of the artwork from magazines covers too....like BackWoodsman and American Frontiersman.
     
  5. Augie

    Augie Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 23, 2014
    As has already been shown the John Russell Manufacturing Co Green River Works has a huge place in American Cutlery History, at their peak they produced 2500 to 3000 dozen pieces of cutlery a day. Until Russell, Sheffield cutlers and companies were the main source of cutlery in America.

    A good read on Russell and a late 1800's Barlow and a 1800's Green River Works marked Jack.

    http://industrialhistory.org/histories/john-russell-mfg-co-and-the-russell-cutlery/


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    Last edited: Mar 28, 2020
  6. cbach8tw

    cbach8tw Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 9, 2006
    Wow, nice,
     
  7. not2sharp

    not2sharp Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 29, 1999
    I recently purchased a Miller Bros Blade T-1 folder, which is a massive overbuilt tactical weighting 15 oz., with a full 1/4" thick blade. An over the top modern knife of questionable utility perhaps. Until you notice that the knife shown below also has a 1/4" thick blade and a second blade to spare. It is a Sheffield folder made by Singleton around the 1880s with British military acceptance marks. Clearly those ancient old timers resembled us more then we like to let on.

    Singleton Profile sm.jpg


    IMG_0218.JPG n2s
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2020
  8. Rich S

    Rich S

    Sep 23, 2005
    Old I. Wilson skinner.

    [​IMG]

    Rich
     
  9. tiguy7

    tiguy7 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 25, 2008
    Here is George Leonard Herter's shameless copy of a Russell Green River skinner. image.jpeg
     
  10. Misplaced Hillbilly

    Misplaced Hillbilly Gold Member Gold Member

    May 16, 2018
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    Not sure how far back the pattern goes,but I imagine harness jacks were very useful when everything was move by animal power. This Challenge dates to the early 20th century, @waynorth that Hudson Bay HJ certainly is very cool:cool::thumbsup: and probably super rareo_O Also think that even though we call them harness jacks, in the early days of mechanization everything ran with leather belts. I imagine a HJ would be handy to have for that as well.
     
  11. Misplaced Hillbilly

    Misplaced Hillbilly Gold Member Gold Member

    May 16, 2018
    [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG]
    The Congress pattern was popular during the American Civil War period, neither of these are quite that old. However I was told that the Ulster probably predates WW1.
     
  12. waynorth

    waynorth Dealer / Materials Provider Dealer / Materials Provider

    Nov 19, 2005
    Good post on Russell knives, Augie!!:thumbsup: Here are a few more!!
    Russell DaddyFish 1.jpg Russell DaddyFish 2.jpg Russell DaddyFish 3.jpg Russell DaddyFish 4.jpg Russell 3 HJ.jpg Russell 3 tang.jpg Russell ebony HJ.jpg
     
  13. cbach8tw

    cbach8tw Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 9, 2006
    Cool folders. I can imagine the persons using them to make a living, repairing a harness, or belt, or going on a picnic after church near one of those little towns that sprung up on the way West. Keep them coming. Would the slaughter houses / stock yards in Chicago use skinners or boning knives to cut up the sections of beef? Or big butcher blades?
     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2020
    Nate Perkins likes this.
  14. Augie

    Augie Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 23, 2014
  15. jstrange

    jstrange

    Mar 31, 2012
    Augie likes this.
  16. not2sharp

    not2sharp Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 29, 1999
    Here are couple of early bolo knives. Knives like this could have been found in the South West as these were often found in regions of the old Spanish empire.

    DSC01117.JPG

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    n2s
     
  17. Rich S

    Rich S

    Sep 23, 2005
    A small, but goodie. IXL gentleman's Sunday knife (circa mid 19thC) with diamond cut pearl scales (all blades in good condition). Pic about life size.

    [​IMG]

    Next a Rev. War era folder from England. Bone scales,blade good shape. Maker's mark unidentified. Iron liners, integral bolster, iron pins.

    [​IMG]

    Rich
     
    Last edited: Mar 29, 2020
  18. Mikael W

    Mikael W Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 21, 2007
    Here's the "Scandinavian Dadley" that Dave made for me.

    DSCN0115.JPG
    They are common allover Northern Europe and sold as a Seaman's or Sailor's knife. That is also my intended use for this one, beside kitchen duty.
    Dave's version in AEB-L has showed very good edgeholding in both light and heavy tasks. It is a perfect allrounder for the size.

    Regards
    Mikael
     
  19. K33ncutter

    K33ncutter Gold Member Gold Member

    514
    Jan 24, 2020
    An old Hammer Brand knife but this one is from the New York Knife Co in Walden where, I think, the Hammer Brand first came about. They closed in 1931 so not sure exactly how old this one is. Some wear on the blades but still snappy. Was taken good care of.
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  20. cbach8tw

    cbach8tw Gold Member Gold Member

    Jan 9, 2006
    Very nice, keep them coming. Showing old knives is a form of therapy while we are social distancing....we can still keep in touch and keep our spirits up.
     

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