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Pte Ryan Kluczynski in the field with tarwar.

Discussion in 'Himalayan Imports' started by Bill Martino, May 19, 2002.

  1. Bill Martino

    Bill Martino

    Mar 5, 1999
    Mail rec'd as follows:


    Mr. Martino!

    How are you doing there Bill? Well, as promised here are some pics of me with the tarwar. You are more than happy to do with these anything you wish! Heck, throw 'em on the website if it will help sales at all. Unfortunately I didn't have the time to do any field tests with it but that is coming down the road too. Thank you so much once again for all you have done in making this blade come to life. If there is a chance that the kamis who made this could ever get to see these pictures I would be most appreciative. I would like to show them exactly the man they made this fantastic sword for and where their efforts went. Thank you again!

    Loyally,

    Pte Ryan Kluczynski
    1 HQ & Signals Squadron
    1 Canadian Mechanised Brigade Group
    Edmonton, Alberta
    Canada
     

    Attached Files:

  2. Bill Martino

    Bill Martino

    Mar 5, 1999
    And this.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. BruiseLeee

    BruiseLeee

    Sep 7, 2001
    :D
     
  4. Yvsa

    Yvsa

    May 18, 1999
    The good Pte desperately needs to blue that blade preferably after a good sanding with about 80 grit sandpaper!!!!
    That's what I did with the CS Trailmaster I gave my son when he was in the military.
    A bright blade gives away too much!!!!!!!
    Didn't Pierre say the fellow in Afghanastan painted his sirupati blade or something?

    Edit for capitalization.:eek:
     
  5. mPisi

    mPisi

    Oct 12, 2001
    I want to know how he carries it. One for practical reasons, and two, I hope it's concealed, because a country that doesn't think its snipers should actually shoot at the enemy (heavens!) probably won't think much about carrying a sword...Article

    He does need to blue or Parkerize that blade. Love that new CADPAT camo...

    Scot (escaped Canada in 1983, never looked back...)
     
  6. Saryet

    Saryet

    3
    May 8, 2002
    Hello everyone! First off, I'd like to say that this is one helluva a good forum and just by reading various posts I have learned alot already. However I did want to take a moment to clarify a few things. As it stands right now I am not in Afghanistan (evident by the pictures) nor does it look as there is any solid information coming down the pipeline of any future deployments for me. Guess I'll have to watch and shoot there... So right now I haven't finalised a carrying method yet but more on that in a bit. Second, I have been really hmmmmming and hahing over blueing the blade. Tactically, I know it makes the best sense and believe me I realise the thing is one giant signalling mirror right now! The only thing holding me back is that this blade was created in a very special manner and I am VERY hesitant to alter the weapon in any way from what the Kamis created. I am not going to be able to word this correctly so I will have to count on those of you who know what it is like to hold a hand forged, created blade on this to understand. But, I am reluctant to do anything to interfere with it's 'power' and feel... Hope that makes sense to you all. That and well, it's not exactly a normal field knife. If I have to unsheath this it is for one reason and one reason only and at that point stealth is right out the window!

    Now as for a carrying solution it is currently affixed to my Becker Patrol Pack (RTO) along the side. I am hoping to get an outer ballistic nylon sheath that goes over the original leather one custom made. With that is going to go either a harness system attatched to my LBV with fastex buckles directly or a body harness rig of sorts. Just two of my options I am looking at. I would love to get some feedback from any of you that may have a better idea or some personal experience in this matter!

    And mPisi, God only knows what kind of fight I'll have to go through trying to make this part of my Line 1 kit. If anyone gives me any kind of crap about being all PC then I'll have to kindly remind them that neither was crashing two airliners into the WTC and to look at why we are where we are now...
     
  7. Yvsa

    Yvsa

    May 18, 1999
    Saryet I understand your concerns, but the kamis wouldn't wish harm on you for anything and by not darkening the blade in some manner means you or mates could be seen and consequently be put in life threatening danger day or night from a reflection.
    Stealth means you do Not light a cigarette on the landward side of your ship 10 miles off land at night because of who might see you from land as that's how far the flare from a lighter or match is visible at night.
    Old vets never struck 3 on a match for the same reasons. Put a little of your own blood on the blade and ask the blade if it accepts your offering and will bless your alterations.
    I am betting it will.
    All of the old Spirit Blades have a history of communicating with their keepers.......
     
  8. raghorn

    raghorn

    Feb 23, 2002
    :) :)
     
  9. ddean

    ddean

    Mar 26, 2002
    Maybe just call it a Himalayan machete. :D
     
  10. munk

    munk

    Mar 22, 2002
    Yvsa, can you do the same things with that blade as a standard khukuri, only more, or are there limitations? I mean, is it ok to cut trees down with that or is that not the right use?

    BTW I don't know much about military stuff, but I can tell you standard parkerization would wear off that blade after cutting brush and thick stuff fast. I wonder if bead blasting or some other coarse finish might be good. Blueing is a controlled rust,is there a way to speed up the oxidation process?

    I remember people wondering if the blade might be too big for the guy. He appears to be in no distress.

    munk
     
  11. munk

    munk

    Mar 22, 2002
    If the blade is used for brush, won't it become shiny even after a dull finish was applied? What solution do forces with machettes use?

    munk
     
  12. ddean

    ddean

    Mar 26, 2002
    On the latter, seems there have been some threads on fake antique blades that mention fake aging processes. Seems like the a finish like old dark grey-brown steel from years in the barn would be just right. An internet search of 'age, metal, chemical / process' in reference to Art / Sculpting will provide some leads. I've noted such while browsing the web.

    A good -heavy- patina won't wear off easily, And, I think, should not weaken the blade. If the surface is somewhat irregular from blasting, only the hight points would wear down, even with substantial use and a lighter patina.

    A blasted finish might be just the thing along with oxidation. The combination would be important and should be tested on another blade first.

    Might also consider irregularity in the pattern / density of blast -&- oxidation to provide a true camoflage effect.

    I think the kamis would agree that a real weapon would be honored to be girded for the field.
     
  13. munk

    munk

    Mar 22, 2002
    Might also consider irregularity in the pattern of blast -&- oxidation to provide a true camoflage effect.>>

    I was thinking that too, break up how the light strikes it...Some forumite recently showed a pic of a etched blade, with black I think....

    but surely the military has solutions for blades in the jungle?



    munk
     
  14. Rusty

    Rusty Moderator Moderator

    Mar 8, 1999
    Saryet, welcome to the cantina.

    This is definitely a place where your feeling about the kamis being part of the handforged blades spirit or presence is understood. Bill every so often remembers to say that the knife chooses it's posessor.

    If you haven't heard, Japanese katanas are wiped with rice paper and "choji" ( clove ) oil. Actually I later learned it is a mineral oil with some clove oil for scent added. But by then I'd gotten a bottle of clove oil for toothaches at the pharmacy and mixed some into a bottle of Kama Sutra Pleasure Garden massage oil and now keep my blades coated with the mixture. Somehow it seems only fair that Excalibur or your own Iron Mistress receive it's due and proper care.

    By the way, has the Tarwar told you his/her/it's name yet?
     
  15. Rusty

    Rusty Moderator Moderator

    Mar 8, 1999
    Black-powder firearms especially the flintlock and percussion rifles were often browned. Maybe check that variant of blueing out with those folks?
     
  16. Bill Martino

    Bill Martino

    Mar 5, 1999
    Welcome, Ryan.

    If you'll spend the time to look at Gorkhas in battle and the field you'll notice that few if any have bothered to take the "shine" off the blades. That said, the kamis and all of us want you to do with that blade whatever makes it serve you best. Only you know what is necessary and it is your life. Listen to all the advice, weight it, and then do as you must.

    Special blessings to you from all of us.
     
  17. Ferrous Wheel

    Ferrous Wheel

    May 16, 2002
    Tarwar looks like a good fit.

    Agree that blueing might be a good way to go, but you could also do a Ferric Chloride etch first. That would give the dull grey look to the blade. Do look good shiny, tho.
     
  18. Bill Martino

    Bill Martino

    Mar 5, 1999
    You could always give the blade a quick shot of flat black spray paint. Non permanent and will work when chips are really down.

    I argued against the tarwar thinking it would be too big but Pte Ryan is a pretty big fellow and the blade doesn't look oversized in his hands.
     
  19. Saryet

    Saryet

    3
    May 8, 2002
    Thank you so much everyone! All of you have made some excellent points and have also given me alot of options to consider. Fortunately I do have the time to weigh all my choices out and do what I think will work the best. Some of your ideas have given me a bit more research to do as well. ;) But to all of you, thanks so much for the positive feedback. It just goes to show that the people that participate in this forum are as dedicated to eachother as they are to the blades and the people that make them.

    Special thanks to you Bill.
     
  20. Bill Martino

    Bill Martino

    Mar 5, 1999
    Stay in touch. We've got a lot of old vets here but few who are currently on active duty and it's good to get current input from the field.
     

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