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Rem 700 Rifle Question & Some Comments

Discussion in 'Gadgets & Gear' started by Old CW4, Nov 7, 2010.

  1. Quirt

    Quirt

    Oct 10, 2005
    Number three is "keep your finger off thr trigger until the sights are on your target and you've made a deliberate decision to shoot". I didn't list them because it is moot in this discussion/issue.
     
  2. dttomcat

    dttomcat

    Apr 14, 2007
    Actually, that is NRA rule #2. The rules I posted came straight off Remington's website
    verbatim.
     
  3. cramsey3006

    cramsey3006

    Aug 2, 2010
    It's not that all of the 700's are trash guns. There has to be a flaw in the production/design somewhere that causes some guns to fire unintentionally. Does Remington know where it is? I think so. Do they think the problem is serious enough to recall? Obviously not. I don't know if any of the guns with the new trigger system have the problem.

    I personally have not had good experiences with the 700 series of guns. I have had one gun that didn't have any issues with either: trigger, barrel, extraction, or bedding issues. It is enough to make me look elsewhere for a centerfire rifle.
     
  4. BladeChemist

    BladeChemist

    261
    Aug 19, 2010
    Occasionally my Remington 597 in .22 will let off a two-round burst when the trigger's pulled :confused:. Wonder if it's related to the Q.C. problems discussed here...
     
  5. UffDa

    UffDa Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 11, 1999
    When walked into the shop today, a discussion was going on about this subject. As usual, CNBC is doing a hatchet job. Some of the people that allegedly worked at Remington had nothing to do with production, design or QC. Also as usual with CNBC and the other of the big 3 (CBS & ABC), the truth has little to do with their "news".

    We have 5 Remington 700s in the shop for custom work. Just for the heck of it I tried to duplicate this condition. I operated the bolt, engaged the safety, pulled the trigger numerous time and released the safety. Nothing happened. I bounced the butt on the floor pretty hard. Nothing happened. These rifles represent production over at least 25 years.

    So, believe what you want, but take what you read from the commie pinko news networks with half a pound of salt.;)
     
  6. cramsey3006

    cramsey3006

    Aug 2, 2010
    This has been an ongoing thing for years and years. On other forums I'm on, there is an incessant debate about the issue.

    You talk about the guns that've come in your shop... How many do you think have come in over the years? 250? 500? 1000? 2000?

    You checked 5 guns today, for example. 5 out of 5,000,000+ that are ok. That's not very good odds for getting a bad gun, basically 1 in a million.

    Compare:

    Odds of getting hit by lightning in your lifetime: 1/6250. (from the NWS)

    You have almost a 900 times better chance of getting hit by lightning than getting your hands on a defunct 700 with the issue. Do you know anyone that's been hit by lightning?

    Just pulling numbers out of the air, I'll say that 95% of the people who own a 700 will never have the problem with it. I don't know anyone personally, other than me, who has had a problem with it. That's only 50-60 rifles though.

    My concern is that it's known problem with the gun that Remington refuses to acknowledge and do anything about.

    There are more defective Remington 700's out there than Toyota vehicles with the gas pedal issue, yet Toyota was forced to recall, check, and repair the vehicles that needed it.

    Why hasn't Remington be forced to recall, check, and repair the rifles that need it?
     
  7. UffDa

    UffDa Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 11, 1999
    So, out of the few people who posted in this thread, 3 claim to have the problem with their 700s. What are the odds of that happening?

    Here's a question. Out of all the claims of this problem, what percentage are legitimate? How many have had the trigger "adjusted"? How many have years of crud inside the trigger housing? How many are operator error?

    I have one more opinion. (Oh no!:eek:) The prime cause of 100% of the people shot by a 700 firing accidentally is human error. The 700 firing when it shouldn't have is an extremely serious problem. The rifle pointing at a foot, person, tent, or horse trailer is pure human stupidity.
     
  8. dttomcat

    dttomcat

    Apr 14, 2007
    Honestly, I think a big part of the problem may well be the placement of the safety switch. You rock your thumb up and forward and your trigger finger comes back and down. No matter how many times they are told some people with rocks in their head just forget to keep their finger off the trigger. Reminds me of a hyper little kid who was in my hunter safety class with his dad. I think I told him three times to keep his (unloaded) weapon pointed in a safe direction during our woods walk. Even some guys that I've been in deer camp with neglect to follow some very basic rules of safety. My rifle has never been opened and it was built in 2004 according to Remington so it has the Walker mechanism. Question me all you want but when I tell you that the gun has fired twice where unintended (once while loaded) I am speaking the truth. Maybe I had my finger on the trigger to but I doubt it. I now believe that these particular rifles do have a higher tendency to fire inadvertantly with no finger on the trigger. My fear now is that I will send it to the factory and they will claim there is nothing wrong with it and I'll be out the shipping with no new trigger and I'll be without my rifle for six months. I also assure you that the trigger is still sealed as I received it from Bass Pro. I'm leaning towards just paying for a whole new after-market mechanism. Too many reported problems from too many different sources. Uffda, I read about these problems years before the CNBC story was even conceived. My gun is out of the box from a highly reputable dealer, has been well maintained without excessive oil on the trigger or in/on the barrell or anywhere. The thing looks brand new. If anything I don't use enough oil.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2010
  9. UffDa

    UffDa Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 11, 1999
    dttomcat, I am not doubting what you say. Give this some thought. At this point, no matter what Remington says or does, you will have a little nagging thought in the back of your head that things aren't right. If you like the rifle other wise, I would suggest that you have the trigger changed to a Timney, Jewel or some other aftermarket unit. Personally, I think it would be money well spent.

    I know the feeling. I went round and round with S&W after they butchered a pristine Pre-Model 27 with a minor problem. After have sent it back to the factory 4 times, I gave up and sold it at a loss. :grumpy:
     
  10. dttomcat

    dttomcat

    Apr 14, 2007
    Maybe I will replace the trigger mechanism with one that I will feel safer with. Would I be able to send the old mechanism to Remington still sealed so they can examine it and determine if there is a problem with it? I would feel a lot better if I know that I have a safer and less questionable trigger. It would be well worth the money to me.
     
  11. kvaughn

    kvaughn Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 28, 2005
    This thread has made me remember an accident I had with my 700 about 10 yrs ago. It was very cold and I had given up on hunting and gone back to my p.u.. Not thinking,I got in and went to unload. I flipped the safety off to be able to work the bolt and eject the un-fired rounds.When I flipped the safety off the rifle went off and blew my windshield out,deafening me for 24 hrs in the process. As someone who has owned rifles and hunted for 48 yrs, I was confused and embarassed by an accident that I thought I had caused. Maybe it wasnt me. Ill be fiddlin' around with the 700 when I get home.:confused:--KV
     
  12. knifeshark

    knifeshark

    98
    Jan 7, 2006
    That program cast Remington in a bad light , and now everyone that owns a 700 is selling. Check out all the 700's for sale. The prices are not good either, like rats running from a sinking ship. I think the fallout from this will eventually bankrupt the company. I just sold my 700 mountain rifle in July(thank god) for a decent price. I had that gun since 1990 took plenty of deer with it , and never had a problem. That aside , Remington ignored and coverd up the facts. Now it's a monster that will not go away. The cost to recall and fix every gun is higher than the value of the entire Remington corporation. From now on I'll be using my Savage .300 EG. (1948). So long Remington.... nice knowing you. What comes around goes around.
     
  13. cramsey3006

    cramsey3006

    Aug 2, 2010
    It's not the first time Remington has been in bankruptcy. They ran in the red for a long time before they were bought by Cerburus Corp years ago.

    If they end up done and gone, they've done it to themselves, IMO.

    I agree that most injuries caused by the defect would have been avoided with proper gun handling.
     
  14. hlee

    hlee

    Dec 5, 2005
    Okay, now I have a really noobish question. On what models/years do you have to put the safety to fire in order to operate the bolt? My dad's 700 bdl is at least 35 years old and the bolt can be operated from the "Safe" position. My 700 bdl was bought new in 1994 or 1995 and the bolt can be operated from the "safe" position. My wife's rifle was bought new in 2004 or 2005 and the bolt can be operated from the safe position...
     
  15. UffDa

    UffDa Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 11, 1999
    If they end up gone, even if it's their own fault, only the anti-gun folks win.
     
  16. dttomcat

    dttomcat

    Apr 14, 2007
    I believe the safety on problem was addressed in 1982 making the age of your father's gun a little off. Just from what I've read. The Walker trigger mechanism began to be addressed in late 2007. I bought my gun in 2007 but according to Remington it was built in twenty 04'.
     
  17. Silverdagger

    Silverdagger

    633
    Dec 18, 2006
    My 1986 model seems fine. CNBC wouldn't be upset if any firearm maker bankrupts, and doubt they would shed a tear if we start importing Chinese comparable replacement models.
     
  18. 338375

    338375

    Nov 4, 2006
    I know it doesn't address the topic, but I've always prefered the 3 position safety on Winchesters
     
  19. Loosearrow

    Loosearrow

    Apr 14, 2008
    Well I did have an incident with a 700 BDL 30-06 that I bought in the late 70's. I was by myself. I had a pack on and was deer hunting with about 3 inches of snow on the ground and had been hunting all day. I got to the truck and laid the rifle on my seat to take my pack off. I released the bottom plate to unload, which left one in the chamber. This particular rifle needed the safety pushed off to travel the bolt and unload the chamber. Safety went to fire I moved the bolt and the gun discharged through the opposite door of the cab. Loud bang. I was hunting by myself. I did some research and found that there had been a problem. I contacted Remington and they stated that I must have had a dirty gun. I told them I spent for years as a Marine and have cleaned my guns correctly for years. They just blew me off. Good lesson to learn about extra safety. Don't point the gun anywhere but the ground. I am very leary of the rifle. My friend has one that you can leave it on safe to empty the chamber. I don't know if they have the same problem. P.S. the trigger is still left as it was from the factory with no adjusting by me.
     
  20. UffDa

    UffDa Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 11, 1999
    It took awhile, but the NRA published a rebuttal to the MSNBC program. They made some good points. NBC is blatantly anti-gun. MSNBC has very few viewers and are desperate to improve their ratings. NBC has been caught falsifying their documentaries. Remember the exploding gas tank debacle?

    Why did MSNBC have so many lawyers on the program? Perhaps to drum up a class action lawsuit? Why did Remington decline to appear on the program? Does anyone think that MSNBC would have been fair?

    The Army, Marines and most law enforcement agencies have been using the Remington 700 for decades. If the rifle is unsafe, does it make sense that they would use it?

    Out of over 5,000,000 700s plus 721s and 722s which have the same trigger how many failures have there been? How many of those were caused by tinkering with the trigger or poor maintenance? How many are just BS?
     

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