Silent and deadly.

Joined
Aug 28, 1999
Messages
519
My dr. marten's "air wair" boots are the most quiet shoes I've ever owned, and they have steel toes.
 
Joined
Sep 9, 2001
Messages
138
I gust don’t get how sneaking up on someone is a useful (yes I am not the smartest individual on the planet):D I apologise if I offended anyone by my "angry face" post.:rolleyes:
 
Joined
Aug 29, 2001
Messages
850
Originally posted by survivor
I gust don’t get how sneaking up on someone is a useful (yes I am not the smartest individual on the planet):D I apologise if I offended anyone by my "angry face" post.:rolleyes:

I can see why!:p

But besides that, apologe aceepted!
 
Joined
Feb 11, 2001
Messages
296
"Sneaking up" might be seen as an aggressive technique, but Avoidance is an aspect of tactics that includes more than dodging blows...
 
Joined
Mar 9, 2001
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1,794
When I worked for the Undergrad Student Gov't CrimeWatch Escort Service at OSU way back when (it merged--and then was replaced by--the Student Safety Service administered by OSU-PD), we had van, bike, and walking patrols. Although most folks related us to the "safety in numbers" concept of escorting students across campus, we also checked buildings to find unsecure doors and windows, and other safety/security hazards.

In short, for several years, I was paid (no, not much!) to pretend I was a burglar on an entire campus a couple times per week!

Now why would I want to "impersonate" a type of criminal? Because I learned the easy, nondestructive ways burglars can gain access, such as merely going around checking doors and windows for one that was unlocked or was able to be "pushed or pulled" open against a defective/inadequate locking device, climbing, and/or finding other weird, creative paths to entry. I also learned how other people in the area often did not pay any attention to us (our uniforms weren't THAT recognizable).

It was a pretty good education, and included a lot of other "lessons" as well. Okay, I gotta tell this story:

I had already been counseled against saying "hi" to people (we worked at night, and my supervisors said I was undoubtedly "scaring people") and also about looking into dumpsters and trash cans, which I was told was unbecoming to our "image" (hey, you FIND stuff in there!), so my partner Chris and I were quite aware we were under scrutiny. However, we came across a window at a lab with a hose dripping some liquid outside, and the window was not closed too tightly. We decided we had to "fix" this unsecure situation (okay, mainly at MY urging).

We got the window open enough to climb in and found ourselves in a "restricted area." Uh-oh, this couldn't be good for our continued employment if some professor got mad or something...

As we were leaving, I couldn't resist taking a peek in the open room across the hall, and found a lab guy sleeping on a cot with a phone directory as a pillow. Hmmm. I couldn't resist. I took a "You Could Have Been Ripped Off" slip out of my pocket, wrote how we got in the room on the back, and left it lying next to his head. I didn't try to keep especially quiet or anything, as I didn't care if he woke up. He didn't. :D

(If anyone ever wonders about my disdain toward those who just don't seem to take security seriously, it's because I've seen THE WORST.)

I would say practicing, or talking about, how to sneak up on someone is just another way to learn how to guard against those who might sneak up on you. Same as learning about "knife fighting" even if you have no intention of ever using a knife...

But there are a few practical uses as well, even though they may be rare. It is not out of the question that someday you may wish to evade/hide from/escape from a criminal or criminals. You may find yourself in the position where you wish to observe something, too, and knowing how to get to cover or in a better viewing area would be useful. If you are being pursued by a superior force and you doubt you can outrun them, yet have a decent headstart, knowing how to "become one with your surroundings" might be a winning survival strategy.

But mainly, what bug said: it's fun!

Karl
 
Joined
Dec 9, 2001
Messages
482
There's a positive aspect to studying / training the ability to move quietly and carefully.

It is calming.

To move in such a manner requires self-control and a greater sense of one's physical / mental being. An ability to move quietly can allow you to analyze something or someone around you, and then make good decisions about whether or not you need or want to become involved. It can also allow you to simply fade off and let things take their course as they will.

It's all too easy for us to blunder into things these days, both physically and otherwise. Training to walk softly and to be aware of one's environment has never been a negative. You startle fewer people, am more prepared for what you encounter, and have more time to make better decisions than if you crash into something like a bull in a china shop.

Walking softly is an art unto itself. It's great for sneaking and peeking, but more practical as an everyday aspect of peaceful living.
 
Joined
Feb 11, 2001
Messages
296
Right on, Sierra. For many years, I've cultivated "situational awareness". This does not mean having a paranoid attitude; it just means paying attention to what's going on around you. I don't enter rooms or buildings without at least looking in first, for example.

Numbers of police officers have been killed/shot "walking in" on a holdup in progress.
I also don't allow folks to approach me without at least sizing them up. It's amazing how many people wander around in an oblivious fog!

While I was doing foot patrol one night, I heard footsteps running up behind me. Probably just one of our innumerable joggers, but I turned sharply to check the runner out. He stopped short as if I had yelled at him!
Here's a good one- I discovered a fire in one of the classrooms one night. Called it in, and stood by the rapidly involving blaze waiting for the FD to arrive. Flames and smoke were starting to come out the window, and typical fire sounds were getting louder.
At least 3 students walked right by without even looking. Finally, one astute lad stopped, checked out the blaze, and walked back to where I was standing. "Officer, I think that building's on fire!"
No S...t, skippy.....
 
Joined
Dec 9, 2001
Messages
482
That's too good:)

How many times have we padded up on a crew doing the bad thing and just watched them wreak their little program of mayhem and havoc...then announced "Is there a problem here?":D

Living silently is a good thing.:p
 
Joined
Jun 23, 2000
Messages
164
Sometimes moving slowly is not desirable, so it's good to
compromise and learn to walk fast, jog, or even run as
quietly as possible. Walking fast is probably best. Travel
parallel to jogging trails, see how close you can keep up
to various people without being noticed. Try not to get arrested,
try not to annoy anyone. Slower is much quieter, but sometimes
you might need speed.
 
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