2019 GEC 29 Humpback/Stockyard Whittler Thread

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I forget about the three springs on this pattern. Poop. Let's hope those M&Gs are uniquely different.
 

NewBlades16

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Bring it on! Osage or Tidioute bone would be my choice.

If I can just go online and buy one, I'll be very pleased. I hope there'll be no lolly-scrambling - I just don't have the time or energy for that.


Misprint? I assume the ram/lamb picture is in reference to the #93 that just came out. Maybe the sheepfoot on the #29 will be a larger ramfoot.
I am predicting that there will be NO scrambling on these. It seems that would make sense to have a larger ramfoot on this 29.
 

Sabercat

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Colin, I'm pretty sure you are correct, as Bill was at Queen when those were made, and the two patterns are almost identical, even down to the three springs. The Winchester black box was #3904, and had spey and pen secondaries with a clip main.
I think you're both spot on. There was also an older 3 spring Henry Sears that may have been an influence on the Winchester and now the 29. I believe it had a spear main with spey and punch secondaries.

Edit:
Found a photo of the Henry Sears. Not my knife nor my photo.
20190622_013157.jpg
 
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Ron Sabbagh

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I'm new to GEC so forgive a newbie question....

By the looks of the drawings...does this mean the 29 will be offered in 2-blade and 2 blade + punch options?

I like the 2 blade option. But at 3 1/2 inches ....a bit small for my tastes.
 

Will Power

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I'm interested in what the acrylic will look like:) If only they could do Butter&Molasses though:cool:

But, the pattern itself doesn't interest me very much.
 

Stropping Young Lad

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Colin, I'm pretty sure you are correct, as Bill was at Queen when those were made, and the two patterns are almost identical, even down to the three springs. The Winchester black box was #3904, and had spey and pen secondaries with a clip main.

Yup, that’s the one! I have a somewhat substantial BB collection, but that’s one I don’t have.

I think you're both spot on. There was also an older 3 spring Henry Sears that may have been an influence on the Winchester and now the 29. I believe it had a spear main with spey and punch secondaries.

Edit:
Found a photo of the Henry Sears. Not my knife nor my photo.
View attachment 1149041

That’s even closer, well done my friend. I like the blade/punch combination better. The BB Winchesters suffered from blade redundancy, in my opinion.
 

knife_fan

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I'm hoping the mention of a Rams foot blade is a mistake.
 
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I thought this was going to be a splitback?

I hoped...

This pattern closely echos a black box Winchester 3 spring knife. I’m wonder if that was the inspiration.

Colin, I'm pretty sure you are correct, as Bill was at Queen when those were made, and the two patterns are almost identical, even down to the three springs. The Winchester black box was #3904, and had spey and pen secondaries with a clip main.

Yep, I'm sure Bill was inspired by his previous work.


I like punches, but I just don't think I can get behind a 3 spring knife with blades that look as short as these.
 

TheChunk91

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Agreed. Three springs will make it a bit of a brick.

It may not. The modern case 6347 has three springs and is pretty much the same width and heft as most other more recently made 3 7/8" to 4" stockmans.


This is a fairly interesting pattern, and is a pattern that's not often seen in this day and age. A vintage knife of a similar pattern will usually get attention and be rather desirable. Vintage three spring three bladed knives are also fairly desirable, and are not really common. GEC has made a lot of whittlers so I think three spring is a good step for them and I'm looking forward to the final product. I may even pick one up. It's a neat pattern that would be good to collect, but it also has good blade selection to be a very useful tool.
 

black mamba

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I really think the "brick" characterization of the three-spring knife is inaccurate. Krinked blades often have an extra catch bit or liner, usually made of brass, which is heavy. The three springs are almost always thinner than if it only had two, so there is very little additional width or weight. Straight blades contribute to more precise cutting over krinked blades, and often have less rub. They do circumvent some of the cutlers' art, but are really a joy to use. I think both two and three-spring knives have their place.
 
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