Jack's Random Tuesday Carry

Discussion in 'Traditional Folders and Fixed Blades' started by Jack Black, Jan 13, 2020.

  1. waynorth

    waynorth Dealer / Materials Provider Dealer / Materials Provider

    Nov 19, 2005
    A random carry as a history lesson!! What a great thread, Jack!!:thumbsup:
    And a couple of interesting knives!! Way to Go my friend!!:)
     
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  2. waynorth

    waynorth Dealer / Materials Provider Dealer / Materials Provider

    Nov 19, 2005
    [QUOTE="Jack Black]Thanks Barrett :) Yeah, nickel silver :thumbsup:

    That's the one amigo :) :thumbsup:

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    I meant to bring these great pictures of Jack's forward!! Here they are!!
     
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  3. Jack Black

    Jack Black Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 2, 2005
    Thanks a lot Charlie :) :thumbsup:
     
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  4. scrteened porch

    scrteened porch Basic Member Basic Member

    Feb 19, 2012
    That smokestack reminds me of my elementary school. I was told that the lightning rod was actually a hook for hanging kids by the lip for playing hooky.
    Turns out I can't do random. I can be variegatious, but not random.
     
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  5. btb01

    btb01 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 26, 2008
    My random carry selection for this Tuesday isn’t an old knife, nor is it a particularly interesting one, but it’s been a few years since I’ve carried it, and it’s outside my GEC-every-day comfort zone :D, so I grabbed it this morning and dropped it in my pocket. :thumbsup:

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  6. Jack Black

    Jack Black Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 2, 2005
    There is a legend local to the area where I live, it spreads out to the whole of the English county of Yorkshire, and maybe beyond. It’s about a man, from South Yorkshire I think, who in 1970 or ‘71, bought a huge consignment of pocket-knives from Japan. He bought such a vast quantity, that he got them very cheap, and he supposedly has a lock-up garage somewhere, still crammed with them, even today. Every now and again, I’ll see some of these knives for sale on a market-stall or at a ‘car boot’, even sometimes in an antiques shop. There are at least a dozen different patterns, maybe a score, some are marked ‘Solar’, some otherwise. The knives have sometimes changed hands several times already, some of the traders claim to know the man who originally bought them, some may have dealt with him, all know the legend. I once met the man himself, mid-week, at an obscure ‘car boot’ in the middle of nowhere, close to the West Yorkshire/South Yorkshire border. He was just packing up to go home, but sold me a few knives before he did so, and told me his story. Maybe it’s even true. That was the best part of ten years ago, and I’ve not seen him since. The knives themselves I see less frequently than I did a decade ago. Maybe that garage, stuffed to the rafters with these knives, is still there.

    There was a time, I’m sure many here will remember, when if you wanted to get a bunch of pocket knives made up, at a reasonable price, for the quality, you went to Japan, rather than to China. I guess that’s how these knives came to be, I might even take a guess at who had them made up, but it would be just a guess.

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    This week, for my Random Tuesday carry, my hand reached out to this 3 ¼” Solar 2-blade Jack. This one was acquired by my friend @ADEE, who picked it up in his local market, and passed it onto me. Unfortunately, being new to pocket-knives at the time, for some reason best known to himself, he decided to mark the bolster. I don’t know if he sharpened it too, but all the knives I’ve had in this series have come sharp, the stainless is decent. Apart from @ADEE’s scarification, and the cheap plastic covers of course, there really isn’t anything to dislike about this knife, particularly for about $5. It’s a well-made little knife, as good as any Rough Rider I’ve had, and better than many. A feller could probably carry a knife like this his whole life, and it saddens me that, (due to the fact I am a total Blade Tart), it’s only going to get carried by me for today.

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  7. JohnDF

    JohnDF Gold Member Gold Member

    May 14, 2018
    Excellent! I'm such a sucker for cheap, well-made knives. :cool::thumbsup:
    Probably left over from my youth when I could only afford the cheap ones, but even the cheap ones were well-built back then. I am especially enjoying the stories that go along with these Random Tuesdays. You know a lot more about your knives than most people. Can't wait to see what pops up next week. :cool::thumbsup:
     
  8. herder

    herder Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 24, 2007
    Interesting story and knife, Jack!!!

    Here is my carry for today...

    BF Wright on London Newsprint .jpg
     
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  9. JohnDF

    JohnDF Gold Member Gold Member

    May 14, 2018
    Jack, your Random Tuesday Carry has inspired me...
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  10. Crazy Canuck

    Crazy Canuck Singing along with the voices in my head Gold Member

    Nov 24, 2013
    Jack, I think we need to commission a limited run of Blade Tart T-Shirts ;)
     
  11. Jack Black

    Jack Black Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 2, 2005
    Me too John, I wish I could get hold of more of these :) Thank you my friend :) :thumbsup:

    Thanks pal, nice Ironwood :) :thumbsup:

    Classic! :cool: :thumbsup:
     
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  12. peanutsxx

    peanutsxx Gold Member Gold Member

    367
    Dec 5, 2017
    Agree with John — the knives are cool but your knowledge about them is the draw! Well done and I look forward to each installment.
     
  13. btb01

    btb01 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 26, 2008
    Another interesting knife, Jack, with an even more interesting story to go with it! :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

    I almost forgot about Random Tuesday today :eek:, but it’s only 2 pm here. I’d better go dig around in my knife cabinet and see what I come up with! :D
     
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  14. btb01

    btb01 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 26, 2008
    Ok, I’m back. ;)

    For today, my Random Tuesday Carry is this Imperial Kamp King scout knife, stamped “Imperial Prov. R.I. USA.”

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    I picked the knife up a few years ago at an antiques shop in Phoenix, AZ. I had actually been on the hunt for this exact knife ever since I had posted a photo of an old Imperial fixed blade knife that belonged to my great-grandmother (it was found in her old fishing tackle box) and learned that, based on the double sheath, it would have originally been sold as a pair with this scout knife. Here they are together:

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    Edited to add: Here's a photo I found back when I was looking for the scout knife, showing the pair together (obviously a nicer example than mine! :D) and an old catalog page advertising the set.

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    Last edited: Jan 28, 2020
  15. Jack Black

    Jack Black Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 2, 2005
    Thanks a lot guys :) :thumbsup:

    That's really cool Barrett :cool: :) :thumbsup:
     
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  16. meako

    meako Gold Member Gold Member

    Sep 4, 2006
    I have that same Richards faux stag scout...great knife ...not the best faux stage evver but not the worst....That accolade thus far belongs to the Japanese.
    Cheers.
     
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  17. Jack Black

    Jack Black Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 2, 2005
    I think the worst I've had was by CK (Carl Kammerling)! :D There has been some pretty rotten stuff produced over the years :eek: Some of the best faux stag I've seen was the Staglon that was used on steak and carving knife handles :thumbsup:
     
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  18. Jack Black

    Jack Black Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 2, 2005
    As a boy I was fishing mad! I lived and breathed it, read about it, studied it, practiced it whenever possible, and when I wasn’t fishing, I would be making tackle, tying flies, practicing casting, or planning how I was going to catch a big fish. It was a bad time for fishing in England unfortunately, particularly in industrial towns like Sheffield, and I usually had to travel two counties away to find some clean water and decent fish. My main knife was a sheath knife, made from a re-purposed kitchen knife, and I used it all the time. I also carried a small Chinese fish knife, like this one @r8shell kindly sent me. I certainly had other pocket knives on me too.

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    Richards of Sheffield made inexpensive clam-shell Fish Knives, just like the US Imperials, Ticklers with a long clip blade and disgorger/fish-scaler, but the only knives which were advertised in the British angling press then – The Angling Times, Angler’s Mail, and Angling Telegraph – were Normark-branded EKA and Martinni folding and fixed blade knives. The only other fishing knives I remember were Japanese-made knives like this one.

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    Fishing was very much a working –class sport here then, still is really, except for trout and salmon fishing. I don’t recall seeing any adverts for angler’s knives in the up-market pages of Salmon & Trout, but that’s the sort of periodical where you might have found a knife like this Brookes & Crookes Angler’s Knife.

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    Angler’s Knives often come much fancier than this modest model, they are very collectible, and they tend to be pricey because there are also collectors of vintage fishing tackle who seek them out, in addition to cutlery enthusiasts. I was very pleased to find this one, and it’s my Random Tuesday carry today.

    Brookes & Crookes always made a nice knife, and could trace their roots back, at least, to the early 19th century, though Brookes & Crookes was only established in 1858, when John Brookes (1825-1865) was joined in partnership by Thomas Crookes (1827-1912). They set up business at Atlantic Works, just up the road from where John Brookes had been born. From the beginning Brookes & Crookes were committed to producing first-class wares, and to paying fair wages to their workforce, with bonuses for new designs. By 1861, they employed about 50 workers, but in 1865, aged only 39, John Brookes died. Crookes took over the firm, aided by his works manager, William Westby, who became a partner. While Crookes acted as the firm’s traveller, Westby ran it, until his retirement (and later, death) in 1891. Crookes remained an energetic traveller, and was joined in running the firm by his sons Herbert and Willis. They remained at Atlantic Works, an unglamorous location, with a modest workforce of 130, but they had acquired a reputation for superb work, and their multi-blade knives could command as much as £30. They won a string of awards and medals, with numerous new designs of multi-bladed and sportsman’s knives. By 1912, the third generation of the family were running the company, but like most Sheffield cutlery firms, they then went into slow decline, with Atlantic Works eventually closing in 1957. A large gas engine, around which the factory was built, was too big to remove, and is rumoured to have been left buried under the apartment buildings which were built on the old site, where I later lived for 10 years.


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  19. Jack Black

    Jack Black Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 2, 2005
    LOL! :D Sorry Mike, I missed this. Great idea! :D :thumbsup:
     
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  20. Dschal

    Dschal Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 18, 2016
    Great post Jack, as always. Thank you for doing this!
     
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