Lets talk GEC!

Angry Angus

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Joined
Apr 9, 2019
Messages
61
Thanks. I've heard of it being scarce, I didn't know it was basically extinct. Disease of some sort if I recall. I guess I should have just searched it. I will now. Nice looking knife.
 

bbfish

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Joined
Jan 18, 2019
Messages
255
Thanks. I've heard of it being scarce, I didn't know it was basically extinct. Disease of some sort if I recall. I guess I should have just searched it. I will now. Nice looking knife.

Yea some kind of blight brought over from asian chestnut species. Pretty interesting to read about, theres apparently a few untouched mature trees somewhere in michigan if I recall. The blight doesnt kill the root system so these century old root systems keep throwing up new shoots only to be taken down by the blight again.
 

BGMoHunter

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Jan 17, 2020
Messages
27
I had a couple of the GEC fixed blades from 2016. One of the caps said American Chestnut and the other said Chestnut Wood. They looked identical to me, so not really sure why they were named differently.
 
Joined
Jan 9, 2016
Messages
392
I think the historicity of Chestnut is neat. Can’t say it’s a particularly pretty wood though. But I’d always prefer wood to acrylic if I had a choice.
 

Elgatodeacero

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Jan 5, 2014
Messages
1,834
One interesting thing is the 89 Fruit Knife appears to have stabilized chestnut covers, and I think previous knives have had normal chestnut wood covers that were not stabilized.
 

Dergyll

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Joined
Feb 24, 2021
Messages
484
I highly doubt I'd be able to get the upcoming busters (my frickin favorite pattern)...I missed the collectorknives early reserve and every drop at dealer seems to be randomly timed (understandable) and disappear in about 5 minutes...

Heres hoping the 50 something dollar won't get marked up too bad...if I dont F5 fast enough, snag a micarta one for me guys 🥲
 

cudgee

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Joined
May 13, 2019
Messages
2,720
Good luck Charlie, waynorth waynorth , with your upcoming procedure, hope all goes smoothly. I don't envy you on your future project of polling for the covers of the upcoming release. Trying to appease the masses, we have a saying over here " You Can Have That On Your Own ". 🤣 🤣 🤣 All the best, and take care mate.🤝
 

EngrSorenson

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Jul 3, 2019
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2,203
There’s a few places I’ve been in West Virginia and Vermont that are actively growing American Chestnuts with the goal to eventually restore the species. Maybe our great great grandkids will see saplings all over.

I’m usually torn when GEC offers knife covers in woods that are getting harder and harder to come by. I do see some benefit to going for something less exotic and more sustainable, like red oak, maple, or walnut. At risk of sounding like a hippy, I do like how they recycle wood sometimes as a great alternative.
 

Elgatodeacero

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Jan 5, 2014
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1,834
Basically all chestnut wood comes from old barns and houses that are torn down and the beams are reclaimed for various uses like flooring, cabinet facing, counter tops, and a few scraps for knife handles.

Nobody cuts down an old chestnut for lumber anymore, but back before the early 1900’s before the chestnut blight came, chestnut wood was prized for its long life and rot resistance. There used to be 3 billion chestnut trees east of the Mississippi River, and the American chestnut was the most common tree. After the blight, Americans used the standing dead lumber for barns, homes and similar construction because the wood was so good and strong.



 

Old Engineer

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Nov 30, 2014
Messages
7,449
There’s a few places I’ve been in West Virginia and Vermont that are actively growing American Chestnuts with the goal to eventually restore the species. Maybe our great great grandkids will see saplings all over.

I’m usually torn when GEC offers knife covers in woods that are getting harder and harder to come by. I do see some benefit to going for something less exotic and more sustainable, like red oak, maple, or walnut. At risk of sounding like a hippy, I do like how they recycle wood sometimes as a great alternative.
I have , if I remember correctly , a 2016 GEC 74 with re-claimed Old Barn Chestnut Wood . The blade is Stainless .

Harry
 

EngrSorenson

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Jul 3, 2019
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I have , if I remember correctly , a 2016 GEC 74 with re-claimed Old Barn Chestnut Wood . The blade is Stainless .

Harry
I like that. To be clear, I don’t think GEC is cutting down American chestnuts, or more accurately, sourcing from someone who does. I’m sure it’s reclaimed, and I approve of that. Same with oil sucker rod- it’s a great way to get more out of quality wood.

Ebony, Bloodwood, etc. are a little more rarified than we’d all like, and I’m not sure how I feel about it. Obviously makes gorgeous covers- I just wonder if it’s a good idea. Maybe I just worry about nothing!
 

Camillus

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Jun 3, 2015
Messages
1,930

Yup, its timbers on CITES such as blackwood, ebony, cocobolo, rosewood (don’t flame me I didn’t check them all) that cause issues. As an international purchaser, I am very wary of not having a CITES authorisation. Although I trust GEC, I know they are a long from the actual forest where the timber is felled, so its not clear whether their timber is ok

Also, at least in Australia, the way our Customs treats CITES changes a lot, makes it hard to keep track.
 

Old Engineer

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Nov 30, 2014
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7,449
I like that. To be clear, I don’t think GEC is cutting down American chestnuts, or more accurately, sourcing from someone who does. I’m sure it’s reclaimed, and I approve of that. Same with oil sucker rod- it’s a great way to get more out of quality wood.

Ebony, Bloodwood, etc. are a little more rarified than we’d all like, and I’m not sure how I feel about it. Obviously makes gorgeous covers- I just wonder if it’s a good idea. Maybe I just worry about nothing!
I am not a Tree Hugger but I do have the same thoughts about that .

Harry
 

KnifeandEasy

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Joined
Jul 9, 2017
Messages
368

Yup, its timbers on CITES such as blackwood, ebony, cocobolo, rosewood (don’t flame me I didn’t check them all) that cause issues. As an international purchaser, I am very wary of not having a CITES authorisation. Although I trust GEC, I know they are a long from the actual forest where the timber is felled, so its not clear whether their timber is ok

Also, at least in Australia, the way our Customs treats CITES changes a lot, makes it hard to keep track.
Very interesting, do you know if kingwood has the same issues? I believe it’s a rosewood same as African black and cocobolo as well.
Edit: and of course East Indian Rosewood
 

Ruhiger Sturm

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Joined
May 1, 2014
Messages
78
Does anyone have any photos of their new 89 in chestnut? I’ve been pretty excited about these mostly for the different looks of chestnut covers.
 

Camillus

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Jun 3, 2015
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Sorry, I don’t know. You need to look up CITES and then check your own Customs rules. I doubt it’s ever an issue for domestic US puchases.
 
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