Traditionals and Cast Iron Cookware

Old Hunter

Gold Member
Joined
Jul 12, 2012
Messages
6,110
Fixed a venison chili for Christmas Eve, we’re about to have the leftover for dinner now. The Lodge skillet in the first picture of the fixings getting assembled is my 12” everyday, not the one I used for browning the meat, (used a Lodge deep skillet for that). Browning picture and then the final product ready to eat. The Old Hickory knife is one of several that were wedding gifts 43+ years ago. OH
Christmas-venison-chili-1.jpg

Christmas-venison-chili-2.jpg

Christmas-venison-chili-3.jpg
 

cudgee

Gold Member
Joined
May 13, 2019
Messages
2,734
Fixed a venison chili for Christmas Eve, we’re about to have the leftover for dinner now. The Lodge skillet in the first picture of the fixings getting assembled is my 12” everyday, not the one I used for browning the meat, (used a Lodge deep skillet for that). Browning picture and then the final product ready to eat. The Old Hickory knife is one of several that were wedding gifts 43+ years ago. OH
Christmas-venison-chili-1.jpg

Christmas-venison-chili-2.jpg

Christmas-venison-chili-3.jpg
Looks like you have everything under control.:thumbsup::p:p:p.
 

Wild Willie

Gold Member
Joined
Mar 19, 2018
Messages
1,263
Looks great! And I do love me a yeungling black and tan. :thumbsup:
Fixed a venison chili for Christmas Eve, we’re about to have the leftover for dinner now. The Lodge skillet in the first picture of the fixings getting assembled is my 12” everyday, not the one I used for browning the meat, (used a Lodge deep skillet for that). Browning picture and then the final product ready to eat. The Old Hickory knife is one of several that were wedding gifts 43+ years ago. OH
Christmas-venison-chili-1.jpg

Christmas-venison-chili-2.jpg

Christmas-venison-chili-3.jpg
 
Joined
Jan 7, 2007
Messages
3,022
Anyone seen the new Blacklock series from lodge ?
The prices are 2×-3× as much on the skillets , but they're supposed to be smoother / nicer and lighter weight.
I'm a bit interested considering it's still a lot less than the fancy premium brands that have popped up in the past few years, not sure I wouldn't just rather smooth out a standard lodge but they sound good on paper.
I went to Williams Sonoma a month ago or so to pick up a Staub (French enameled cast iron) on sale and they had the Lodge Blacklock series in stock. Lodge Blacklock is just as rough as the regular Lodge line, but they are thinner and feel significantly lighter. Williams Sonoma had a sale for a ~10" and ~12" skillet set, but even on sale they were ~3x the price of regular Lodge.

Thinner/lighter cast iron will heat faster than thicker/heavier pieces but won't have as much heat retention and won't conduct as well. Conduction works better in thicker materials.

A couple other points I want to make after reading through the thread:
Modern dish soap will not harm seasoning. It's not really needed that often for cleaning, but it won't hurt anything. I generally use hot water and/or some kosher salt if something manages to stick, which isn't that frequent. Seasoning is polymerized oil, and a little dish soap won't affect it at all.

Butter is terrible for seasoning because the milk fat solids will burn at a low temp. Oils with a higher smoke point are better (canola, etc.) for seasoning.

Modern Lodge pieces have a rough interior surface, but after using them (I use metal utensils) a while and building up a few layers of seasoning they smooth out nicely. Same goes for Victoria cast iron made in Colombia. My Victoria 12" skillet is noticeably lighter and a bit thinner than my Lodge 12" too. The main downsides to a Lodge versus vintage are that Lodge will take longer to heat up, you really should bake on a couple layers of seasoning before use, and then you have to use it regularly for a while (maybe a month or two) to build up more seasoning before it is nice to use. Modern Lodge is cheap and takes a little breaking in work but you do not have to sand them or do anything involving power tools to get them to cook well. You just have to use them.

I also use French carbon steel skillets (De Buyer and Matfer Bourgeat) and they are fantastic. They come unseasoned, so you have to go through a seasoning process, but they're completely smooth. You can also find them for maybe 2x what Lodge costs, so they aren't too terribly expensive. They're also much less brittle than cast iron so they actually are nearly indestructible. They're a bit thinner than Lodge, but carbon steel has lower thermal conductivity than cast iron, so they hold heat well. They will preheat fairly quickly compared to Lodge because of the lower mass.
 

kamagong

Gold Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2001
Messages
9,311
Modern dish soap will not harm seasoning. It's not really needed that often for cleaning, but it won't hurt anything. I generally use hot water and/or some kosher salt if something manages to stick, which isn't that frequent. Seasoning is polymerized oil, and a little dish soap won't affect it at all.

Yup. The advice not to use soap is outdated and goes back to when soap was made with lye. Lye will strip seasoning right off. Modern dish soaps are very mild in comparison and won't harm a thing.

Don't believe me? Try this little experiment. Take some Dawn, or Palmolive, or whatever dish soap you prefer and try to wash the black off your cast iron skillet's handle. You'll wear your arm out before you remove the seasoning.
 

Hickory n steel

Gold Member
Joined
Feb 11, 2016
Messages
15,136
I've heard about modern dish soap being okay, but I still stay away.
I have never needed more than hot water and a stiff nylon bristled brush.

Hot skillet under the hottest water I can get from the sink and I have been golden.
The only thing I can say is that doing this every time seems to be a bit harmful to seasoning if you do not have enough of it built up.
Once properly seasoned it was fine.

Maybe it's just something specific I'm doing though.
 

cudgee

Gold Member
Joined
May 13, 2019
Messages
2,734
Maybe it's just something specific I'm doing though.
I am not saying it is, but it could be. When you have finished cleaning it under the hot water, wipe it dry, and while the pan is still hot/very warm, give it a rub over the inside with whatever oil you use to season it, then just let it cool down. You can even put it back on the heat for a minute or two if you don't think it is hot enough. This helps keep it seasoned and oiled, you only use a very light coating of oil. I have a tip for you, i keep a small piece of rag in a small plastic container that i just pull out to do this, the rag has enough oil on it to lightly coat the inside of the pan, if i feel it is drying out just put a small amount of oil in the pan and wipe it all around. This keeps the rag just oiled enough to keep up the process. Hope you had a good Christmas.
 

Georgecatl

Gold Member
Joined
Oct 26, 2010
Messages
2,057
Have any of you done cast iron restoration? I’ve got a 15” Lodge Skillet that I retrieved from the ruins of my old hunting cabin that burned 15 years ago.
It sat out in the elements for several years and has hung in my garage for at least a decade. It’s rusty and pitted.
I built an electrolysis tank today to see if I could bring it back. It may be too pitted, but it may make a usable camp skillet. Here is a before pic and I’ll post a follow up with a traditional knife for reference. E981BD73-7D18-4EDD-8A5A-E22325BBE2C5.jpeg
A4E27F77-5D63-4922-B8E5-95BAAD9F9B09.jpeg
 

cudgee

Gold Member
Joined
May 13, 2019
Messages
2,734
Have any of you done cast iron restoration? I’ve got a 15” Lodge Skillet that I retrieved from the ruins of my old hunting cabin that burned 15 years ago.
It sat out in the elements for several years and has hung in my garage for at least a decade. It’s rusty and pitted.
I built an electrolysis tank today to see if I could bring it back. It may be too pitted, but it may make a usable camp skillet. Here is a before pic and I’ll post a follow up with a traditional knife for reference. View attachment 1481314
View attachment 1481315
There are plenty of good youtube videos you should look at. Like everything sort out the ones from people who know what they are talking about, and dismiss the idiots. But there is some really good stuff out there, and yours can be saved and has many years in it yet.
 

Arathol

Basic Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2003
Messages
2,142
Thats not bad at all....clean up the active rust with a wire brush, get as much as you can off, use steel wool if needed. Coat it with bacon grease, then put it inside your grill for a while on high. It'll turn black as the carbon layer forms on the iron. Cool it off, wipe it down and check to see if its clean. If needed hit it again with the steel wool or wire brush, grease and heat it again. That pan should clean up nicely. I've seen worse.....
 

cudgee

Gold Member
Joined
May 13, 2019
Messages
2,734
I do like a cast iron seared lamb chop... With which knife did you slice them up?
An Italian Maserin, 440 stainless lock back. It is a great steak and all purpose knife and extremely sharp. I used to use it when i went hunting, as was just a useful all round knife in the field and campsite. Now i just use it in the kitchen.:thumbsup:.
IvZaKsW.jpg

FgCMbY9.jpg
 
Top