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Recommendation? What's the best 2-grit field sharpener

Discussion in 'Maintenance, Tinkering & Embellishment' started by maximus83, Sep 22, 2017.

  1. maximus83

    maximus83

    Nov 7, 2011
    For all-purpose field use stone, do you prefer puck or more of a traditional rectangular stone? Like I said above, I've had good success with the cheapo Lansky puck on field sharpening axes and other stuff including a mower blade, although if they have a LOT of damage only a bastard file (or a grinder) is really going to work fast. The thing is, it almost seems like the rectangular smaller stone would be easier to use with most normal sized blades, and could still double for use on the large blades. My main reason for using a puck on larger blades is it seemed easier (and safer) to hold onto.
     
  2. HeavyHanded

    HeavyHanded

    Jun 4, 2010
    This^

    With a hatchet or machete the puck is much nicer. When I'm in the field I normally won't touch up my edge with anything more than some honing compound on bark or smooth wood - often no more than ash from the fire. My choppers need a lot more touchup.

    If primarily I was using knives and usage was heavy enough I expected to repair damage, a small rectangle stone might get the nod.
     
  3. maximus83

    maximus83

    Nov 7, 2011
    Have you tried to field sharpen normal sized knives on a puck? I'm wondering how well that would work (mainly the safety and ergonomics of trying to do "slices" on that small round stone, where you're bringing the blade to the stone rather than the other way around). If it could be done reasonably well, I might incline toward getting 42's puck (which as the same grits as the field stone) or maybe even the Gransfors Bruks puck, and just use a single 2-side puck for everything.
     
  4. Minnesota Man

    Minnesota Man Gold Member Gold Member

    848
    Sep 30, 2014
    Work sharp field sharpener.
     
  5. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    For machetes I suggest a scythe stone. You can use it like a file. You can use a puck, for sure, but scythe stones are fantastic for machetes.
     
  6. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    You can do it just fine. The rounded edges just won't get all the way to the base of the blade unless there's a jutting heel like on a chef's knife. If there's a ricasso you can get within 1/8" but not that last bit. That region tends not to dull anyhow, though, so it's not typically an issue.
     
  7. HeavyHanded

    HeavyHanded

    Jun 4, 2010
    I'd get 42's puck over the Gransfors - $50 for a puck is nutty. If I didn't already have multiple Crystalon pucks stashed in all my gear I'd have certainly ordered one by now. I might have to get one anyway, along with a pair of Condor Mayflowers for the kids to camp with...

    When using a puck I tend to do circular. I will only use a single directional sweep when final deburring. When field sharpening I find this to give me best results across a range of tools.
     
    FortyTwoBlades likes this.
  8. mbkingshane

    mbkingshane Gold Member Gold Member

    Oct 7, 2013
    Fallkniven DC4 for me works best. Aggressive diamond in one side finer ceramic on the other. The diamond puts a rough edge very very quickly then clean up with the fine side.
     
  9. maximus83

    maximus83

    Nov 7, 2011
    @FortyTwoBlades, given you have 2-grit field sharpeners including AF field stone, I'm wondering could the AF bench stone be offered in a 2-grit solution as well? Man that would be really convenient.
     
  10. David Martin

    David Martin Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 7, 2008
    I have a SiC puck but on a axe I get better results with a Norton India stone. I probably just don't work w/ it enough. DM
     
  11. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    Unfortunately, we can't. The volume/surface area is too great for the differential in shrink rate during firing. They pull themselves apart in firing. It's only doable on the smaller stones, and even they were a challenge. That big of a difference in grit size makes it difficult to do a ceramic bond with a dual grit.
     
  12. adamlau

    adamlau

    Oct 13, 2002
    I use an SPS II 1K/6K combo on the job for field repairs. The 1K with a heavy slurry is capable enough of handling most damage short of major (e.g. detip). The 6K is only used to apex and to touch up. Have a local tile shop cut it in half for a few dollars if need be. I am hoping that Baryonyx introduces their line of SiC stones sooner rather than later...
     
  13. adamlau

    adamlau

    Oct 13, 2002
    @FortyTwoBlades: Will we see a medium and fine SiC offering from Baryonyx this year? Would rather it release abrasive readily rather than not. I don't mind frequent flattening and wasting a bit of abrasive for speed.
     
  14. FortyTwoBlades

    FortyTwoBlades Baryonyx walkeri Dealer / Materials Provider

    Mar 8, 2008
    We'll definitely be doing medium and fine silicon carbide blends, but it remains to be seen if it'll be this year or next. Within a year rather than the year, almost certainly.
     
    adamlau likes this.
  15. maximus83

    maximus83

    Nov 7, 2011
    I'm done researching and finally decided to go with the AF field stone. I think despite some trade-offs, it's the best available option for a single do-it-all field sharpener that's super reasonable cost and meets all my requirements (I'm quite picky about field sharpeners because I need a better one for backpacking). My reasons for going with the AF are summarized in another thread about field sharpeners:

    Sharpening Stone/Tool for Field of Hard use Blades
     
  16. maximus83

    maximus83

    Nov 7, 2011
    Took the AF field stone and used it the way you often would in the field. Handheld, completely dry. Took a Kershaw Chill that has a slight recurve, profiled it to about 12 dps on the 240 grit side. Then apexed on the 400 grit (white) side. About 7 minutes of total work, this thing is absolutely razor sharp. This stone is a winner, I think it can do everything I'd want in the field, and also can even mount it up in my stone holder and use it for folders and smaller knives at home.

    To take the blade to the next level: I stropped it on basswood with Gritomatic CBN 1 micron compound. This thing is now just crazy sharp. One stone, 2 grits, and a little stropping on wood. I like minimalist sharpening. :p

    [​IMG]
     
    FortyTwoBlades likes this.
  17. retzius

    retzius

    Sep 17, 2009
    I like the Fallkiven DC4. As a field tool I think it has a great balance of a coarse diamond side that can quickly repair a damaged edge and a fine ceramic side that can give you a good toothy working edge.
     
  18. adamlau

    adamlau

    Oct 13, 2002
    You can always give the Razor Edge coarse SiC stone a shot. It has been a few years since I have used one. Have not tried the fine version. Does get a bit dusty. But that should not be an issue when used outdoors in the field. Can be used with a lubricant.
     
  19. tiguy7

    tiguy7 Gold Member Gold Member

    Jun 25, 2008
    EB090B2E-7183-4DD3-866F-57EC10B86F4E.jpeg The DMT F/EF folding sharpener is now available in HC (hard coat). This technology is supposed to make the diamonds more resistant to being dislodged from the Nickel matrix. One side is 25 micron/600 mesh, the other is 9 micron/ 1200 mesh.
     
  20. maximus83

    maximus83

    Nov 7, 2011
    I have the DMT folding sharpeners (mine is C/F), and have used various handheld ceramic field stones by Spyderco in the past as well as Sharpmaker. Strictly my opinion as a user, no Cliff Stamp approved scientific testing to validate it:

    • The DMT are good, but for significant field work, you are going to want the folding XC/C sharpener. I have used the C/F one extensively, it is not quite coarse enough. But with the XC, the C would be great. The C at about 325 mesh gives you everything you need for ordinary field sharpening with a nice toothy edge. And the XC gives you what you need for most ordinary edge profiling or field repairs. And if you want more fine grits to choose from, then I'd recommend getting TWO DMT folding sharpeners and bringing them both with you for field sharpening: the XC/C, and the F/EF. Personally, I like DMT but if I was going to go this route, I could get by entirely with the XC/C while backpacking or working on the property and field sharpening.
    • I don't prefer ceramics anymore--not for field sharpening. This would rule out for me both the new Spyderco Doublestuff (which I posted in another thread about here), and options like this Fallkniven stone. I've used ceramics for years in the field or on trips with little pocket stones, and on Sharpmaker, and I find them to only be useful for a narrow and specialized range of sharpening tasks. Two that come to mind where a carefully employed ceramic CAN be very effective: (1) creating and maintaining a micro-bevel on an already consistent and well refined edge bevel, and (2) refining an already apexed edge for improved cutting performance in certain kinds of tasks (like push-cutting). This latter task is very hard to do and keep a consistent angle without messing up your edge, BTW. Also these ceramics load very quickly and are harder to maintain in field use than other stone types. Neither of these sharpening tasks in my experience is highly necessary in field usage of blades, and both of these tasks if you do want to do them in the field, can be covered well by other types of stones that are more versatile and can handle these, as well as many other sharpening tasks. For instance: if you got the 2 DMT folding sharpeners listed above in XC/C, and F/EF, you'd have the whole range of grits and could do everything you'd need in field sharpening, and could handle everything from profiling and significant edge repair, all the way through apexing and refining your edge.

    Just from having tried and used extensively a lot of the different types of stones out there, for all-purpose field stones, I think it's hard to beat either the 4-grit DMT combo of XC/C and F/EF, or the 2-grit Arctic Fox. My pref is still the AF, because it does the whole range of sharpening tasks and does them amazingly well in a single stone. Also for the price conscious, the AF is like $18, the DMT are over $30 for each folding sharpener, and the new Spyderco Doublestuff is $45. Not only is the AF the best PERFORMING sharpener of any I've tried in field conditions, but it's so cost-effective I plan to get a couple more of them and keep 1 in my day pack (I may get the pocket size for this one), one in my emergency kit in my trunk, and keep one at work.
     
    FortyTwoBlades likes this.

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