Why Bowie gets all the love and not Hudson Bay

Discussion in 'General Knife Discussion' started by thatsaknife, Jan 4, 2016.

  1. Midwest Firecraft

    Midwest Firecraft

    293
    Sep 16, 2012
    " I currently have a Busse MUK, which is a high end Nessmuk. It is 0.14" thick and nearly 2 inch wide blade. IT is a great slicer." - Cobalt
    Cobalt, I tried to message you but inbox is full. If you see this which Muk is .140? I have the mini muk that is .160, as far as I can research the original Muk is .160. Is the anorexic Muk .140?
     
  2. Cobalt

    Cobalt Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 23, 1998
    I had no idea my inbox was full. cleared it out a bit. The std MUK is somewhere in the 0.14 to 0.15 range
     
  3. Midwest Firecraft

    Midwest Firecraft

    293
    Sep 16, 2012
  4. Cobalt

    Cobalt Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 23, 1998
    Hey, but I could be wrong, lol, it has been many scotch bottles since I measured the thickness. maybe it is 0.165
     
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  5. DunRanull

    DunRanull

    32
    Sep 9, 2011
    That knife has a style to it! Looks suspiciously like a kitchen knife (made in France) that resides in my counter-top block. Probably much thinner than that example tho.
     
  6. Cobalt

    Cobalt Gold Member Gold Member

    Dec 23, 1998
    Yes estimates put it at between 1/4" and 3/8". Length estimates vary from 9" to 11" blade.
     
  7. deltablade

    deltablade Gold Member Gold Member

    Jul 29, 2006
  8. 22-rimfire

    22-rimfire Gold Member Gold Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    Bowie is a rather loosely used knife pattern.
     
  9. afishhunter

    afishhunter

    Oct 21, 2014
    I think the original "sand bar" knife was a modified butcher knife.

    From what I understand, the original "sand bar" knife either no longer exists, or is long, long lost, so we'll never know for sure.
    (and even if it were located and proven beyond a doubt to be the knife used by Bowie on the sand bar, too many people would refuse to believe, because it does not match what they picture in their "minds". (note quotes)
    Sad fact:
    "Tis easier to believe a lie, than to admit one was wrong or mistaken about something for most of their lives."
     
    Last edited: Dec 28, 2019
  10. Lesknife

    Lesknife Platinum Member Platinum Member

    744
    Mar 31, 2018
    I think the Hudson Bay knives didn’t get as much press because it’s hard to get a story out of mundane chores and regular life activities. Where as the Bowie became known and associated with fightin! A bloody knife fight sounds a lot more interesting than doing mundane chores. Just my humble observation and opinion.
     
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  11. herisson

    herisson Apple slicing rocking chair dweller Platinum Member

    Mar 11, 2013
    The Hudson Bay knife is a tool and the Bowie knife is a myth... Both are great patterns, in the end it depends what you're gonna do with them...
     
  12. cbrstar

    cbrstar Gold Member Gold Member

    920
    Sep 7, 2015
    I'm a Canadian and I've yet to see a Hudson Bay knife in person, but I've seen tons of Bowies over the years.

    Bowie was publicized in 1827 after Mississippi Vidalia Sandbar Duel. And English manufacturers in Sheffield stepped in pretty soon after and started producing copy's. They were a popular go to in the Civil War which I think made them even more legendary. Where as it sounds like the Hudson Bay camp knife wasn't made until the 1850's also by Sheffield. And it was never really used in War.

    Just goes to show you that even over 100 years ago Tacticool still out sold Bushcraft :D
     
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  13. herisson

    herisson Apple slicing rocking chair dweller Platinum Member

    Mar 11, 2013
    @cbrstar To see a Hudson Bay knife in person, and available, check out the Condor catalogue. They have been making them for quite some years. There's also a guy specialized in reenactment knives who makes one. PM me for the link if you are interested. As to the application, the original Bowie (or the first...) was definitely intended as a fighting knife. The Hudson Bay knife was intended as a camp knife, supposed to combine the utility of a knife and a hatchet.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2019
  14. Sidehill Gouger

    Sidehill Gouger

    Dec 29, 2007
    Hudson Bays seem to be a lot later pattern than some think. Not really a "mountain man" knife.
     
  15. herisson

    herisson Apple slicing rocking chair dweller Platinum Member

    Mar 11, 2013
    From the guy's website :
    [I researched the Original Hudson Bay for an article in Tactical Knives Magazine. I saw, measured and studied several originals at museums. These knives were called "the knives with the eyes" by the Canadian Indians who were the original targeted market for the first trade in the 1800s. This one has an 8 inch inch blade of 1/4 inch steel. It is blade heavy for doing heavy camp chores and eliminating the need for a belt axe. The Working Man's version has three rivets/side; the Chief's Grade has the front brass scale and two large rivets.]
     
  16. herisson

    herisson Apple slicing rocking chair dweller Platinum Member

    Mar 11, 2013
    I easily see the mountainmen preferring their Green River butcher knives and their hatchet to the Hudson Bay knife. As with all "jack of all trades" it's a bit mediocre at everything. I didn't like mine : too heavy, not a great slicer, not a great chopper and not a great splitter.
     
  17. Mikael W

    Mikael W Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 21, 2007
    Well, I have yet to put the HBC to any real world use, before I can form an opinion.
    I have always prefered the Bowie style, but the HBC is a historic model and nice to have in the collection.

    Here's the Odin with a recently made Red Deer handle.
    IMGP6561.jpg
    The idea was to keep it as close as possible to a mid 19th century style.
    Background pic is from Norm Flayderman's book"The Bowie Knife".

    Regards
    Mikael
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2019
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  18. herisson

    herisson Apple slicing rocking chair dweller Platinum Member

    Mar 11, 2013
    That's beautiful ! I definitely see the Volcano with such a handle. Awesome !
     
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  19. Mikael W

    Mikael W Gold Member Gold Member

    Apr 21, 2007
    That's certainly just as possible to do as on the NL's! :thumbsup:
    As good Sambar Stag are getting harder to find, I have switched to localy sourced European Red Deer antlers.
    No regrets as Red Deer Stag can be real nice in its own right.

    Regards
    Mikael
     
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  20. Sidehill Gouger

    Sidehill Gouger

    Dec 29, 2007
    It kind of depends on how you define the term "mountain man" but the Green River knives came after the beaver trade. During the 1820-40 period they mostly used I Wilson and other English brands.
     
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