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It followed me home (Part 2)

Discussion in 'Axe, Tomahawk, & Hatchet Forum' started by Steve Tall, Jun 12, 2014.

  1. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    The Holzaxt is defiantly a specific thing and unique at that. Certainly not “Dutch”, North American in origin but the name comes from the Deutschland community in Pennsylvania.
     
  2. rjdankert

    rjdankert Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    That's what I got from Google Translate. Searching for "holzaxt" it seems to be in current use by German sellers for just that: an axe for wood (i.e. not a specialized axe).

    Curious where he got that. I don't have access to that book to see his references.

    Kauffman has one in American Axes (original copyright date 1972):

    [​IMG]

    Looks like Kauffman got the term from Mercer (though apparently not the spelling ;)).

    Ancient Carpenters' Tools
    Henry C. Mercer
    Originally published in 1929:

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    https://books.google.com/books?id=uRXCAgAAQBAJ&pg=PA21&lpg=PA21&dq=henry+c+mercer+holzaxt&source=bl&ots=e635yOYSDJ&sig=ACfU3U2rMmnSyVv2bj6dnTWJzQrPapc7qw&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwic38egsc7kAhWKqp4KHQZhDjsQ6AEwDXoECAkQAQ#v=onepage&q=henry c mercer holzaxt&f=false

    Bob
     
    Miller '72, Fmont, jake pogg and 6 others like this.
  3. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    That is awesome!!! Thanks for the resources. I have Kauffman and didn’t even look. LoL. It’s cool that those examples also have the “beak” shape to the bit.
     
    Miller '72, Fmont, Agent_H and 2 others like this.
  4. Meek1

    Meek1

    174
    Aug 11, 2019
    Another excellent take. What is the big vise? It's a beast! I saw a rock island today that was about that big. But I had my arms full already LOL.
     
  5. Meek1

    Meek1

    174
    Aug 11, 2019
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Square_peg

    Square_peg Gold Member Gold Member

    Feb 1, 2012
    Holzaxe simple means "forest axe" or "wood axe". The term definitely came to America with many immigrants. Any woodsman's axe can rightly be called a holz axt.
     
    A17, Hairy Clipper, rjdankert and 2 others like this.
  7. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    Only in the colloquial usage.
    The axes like mine shown by Mercer and Kauffman are a specific form. They are writing about a very unique pattern for splitting. Clearly specialized in form and function with the extended poll. Or as Mercer wrote “The Holzaxt is a rare tool which the writer, after years of search, thus far has failed to find it anywhere in the United States except among the Pennsylvania Germans....”
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2019
  8. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
  9. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    Yet again, I need to thank @Yankee Josh for helping facilitate this purchase for me. Good looking out! It’s a 3lb 1889 patent Perfect with the fullest bit that I have ever seen on one.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Yankee Josh

    Yankee Josh Gold Member Gold Member

    Mar 31, 2018
    Man that is a beauty...
    I got few new things. The screw driver and hammer(planishing?) were again from the dump. Ever since I found the S&N there I make sure and check whenever I have demo to drop off. 20190914_151129.jpg The cleaver was from an antique store. Got it for $20 which isn't too bad considering it's condition. Stil has the factory edge on it! 20190914_151141.jpg
    I know what the -8 is for. It's 8" long. I'd like to know what the 81 is though. Anybody know?
     
    Square_peg, Miller '72, Meek1 and 6 others like this.
  11. Hairy Clipper

    Hairy Clipper Basic Member Basic Member

    215
    Feb 28, 2009
    That is one handsome axe! If Paul Bunyan didn't have such a strong desire to use a forehand and backhand swing to utilize both sharp edges on his double bit axe I could see him using an axe like that!

     
    Meek1, Fmont, Yankee Josh and 2 others like this.
  12. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    That’s an axe prize right there!
     
    Miller '72, Meek1, Fmont and 4 others like this.
  13. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    Mar 2, 2013
    When Mercer wants to do his updated version he could look around Salzburg for traces of this axe.
    Kliebhacke is cleaving axe if there were any question, holzaxt is so vague it make no sense and Dutch is English.[​IMG]
     
  14. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    Well, Henry Mercer died in 1930 if I’m not mistaken.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Chapman_Mercer

    He was a paleontologist among many things, native to Pennsylvania, and attributed the tool’s shape to early Pennsylvania German Immigrants. The German Immigrants called it as such based on his contact with them during the era they made them there and used them.

    Much like the Dutch occupation of Sud Afrika giving spawn to the Afrikaner culture and it’s own Language, they likely had simplified or local words for items. I don’t know if appealing to the publisher to revise it to “Klienhacke” would be necessary?

    More interesting to me is it’s age, condition, the great handle on it, being locally smith made, and the prospect of it potentially being a piece of Pennsylvania history.

    Similar to the Pennsylvania-made breitbeil that are considered quite valuable in regards to others given the relatively short time span they where made in comparison to those of the Mother Land. No better in form or function - just interesting from a historical perspective.
     
  15. Ernest DuBois

    Ernest DuBois

    Mar 2, 2013
    All very interesting. Did you happen to pick out the relevant example, center bottom row ? Mercer states, " The holzaxt is a rare tool which the writer after years of search has failed to find anywhere in the United Stated except among the Pennsylvania Germans, or to trace to Europe." So, confusing as the sentence is, the display board including, das "Salzburger Kleibhacke", promotion material from the Himmelberger Zeughammerwerk, demonstrates the connection to Europe Mercer seemed to be looking for. Unless, since the axes from the promotion board are recent someone would argue for a kind of reverse migration but that would be an unlikely stretch I think.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2019
    Yankee Josh and Hairy Clipper like this.
  16. rjdankert

    rjdankert Gold Member Gold Member Basic Member

    Mar 10, 2011
    It is not clear to me that Mercer was actually looking for a connection to Europe.


    Bob
     
  17. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    I did read what what you presented (as always) and also immediately recognized the kliebhacke (quite a refined example there on the advertisement board). It is assumed it was influenced by German immigrants. The whole display is quite neat in my opinion. There is no argument as to reverse migration for the pattern - if so, that would make it an "American" invention...
    Though, many of the patterns presented there look like many others that may have developed elsewhere or are variations on a theme as well, but were refined and offered to the public.

    Mercer cited German immigrants as the users of the axe and was not able to ascertain the base form's origin, or they were not willing/able to share with him. Maybe generational lapses left "Holz axt" as "wood-splitter" or "processsing axe". A "woodpile axe" to make stove-sized pieces from larger ones.

    I jump at the "Holz axt" being considered the wrong term with us here. "Holzaxe" is what the American German immigrants called that style, regardless of resulting forged forms.

    It's all semantics in the way of talking about the significance of the tool that he shared in reference to where it comes from.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2019
  18. Agent_H

    Agent_H Gold Member Gold Member

    Aug 21, 2013
    [​IMG]
     
    Meek1, Yankee Josh and Hairy Clipper like this.
  19. junkenstien

    junkenstien

    783
    Feb 15, 2017
    That ugly sob reminded me of another ugly sob name of Charles who surely would have been honored to have something named after him you could call it the Krauthammer. That perfect is beautiful .Anyway to measure how deep the bevels are?
     
  20. ithinkverydeeply

    ithinkverydeeply Gold Member Gold Member

    980
    Dec 17, 2018
    LoL. I don’t have the best gauge to measure them but I’ll see if I can get some idea... There seems to be some variance. This one is only 3lb but the larger Dayton Perfect has deeper bevels and a heavier ridge between them.
     

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