Jerks who abuse HI warranty suck

Discussion in 'Himalayan Imports' started by tyr_shadowblade, Jun 14, 2009.

  1. Cpl Punishment

    Cpl Punishment

    Jan 28, 2006
    That was a Noss test. He intentionally tests blades to destruction (or as close as he can get to destroying them) to see just how much they can take. Not to say that those are things that should be done.
     
  2. HARPERSGRACE

    HARPERSGRACE

    216
    Aug 28, 2004
    Videos like that are a testament to the quality of HI blades and the ridiculousness of people who feel that type of test is necessary.
     
  3. 100eyes

    100eyes

    752
    Sep 12, 2008
    I personally feel those types of tests are necessary. Destruction tests are common in a variety of products and while you may never use it to its limit, it's nice to know where that limit is.

    Ferrari also does destruction tests on their cars, driving them like maniacs until something breaks.
     
  4. Esav Benyamin

    Esav Benyamin MidniteSuperMod

    Apr 6, 2000
    Wrong, wrong, wrong.

    Industrial "testing to destruction" is not done by "driving them like maniacs" but by driving at carefully calibrated speeds over a measured course, crashing them at known speeds into a barrier of carefully constructed durability. In other words, it is all precisely repeatable, a hallmark of scientific testing.

    noss4 just whales away with no measured force or angle, and expects us to accept his word that he treats every company's products the same. I wouldn't buy a used car from a man like that.
     
  5. Steely_Gunz

    Steely_Gunz Got the Khukuri fevah Moderator

    May 9, 2002
    Exactly:) I've been trying to convey this point for a few years now. At least Cliff Stamp had enough of a scientific mind to TRY and use measured force and angles. His science was still bad, but at least it was an effort.
     
  6. C.S. Graves

    C.S. Graves

    Jun 13, 2006
    Yeah, there's too many variables for a lot of these tests to be truly authoritative. And while a lot of folk were upset to see a 12" AK beaten on in this manner, I think it did pretty darn good considering that the kamis don't have access to all the whiz-bang industrial tools and supersteels used in some of the production blades reviewed.
     
  7. noss4

    noss4

    Jul 7, 2006
    So you work for Ferrari or something. ? :rolleyes:

    Here is a link to Ferrari Panamerican 20,000: Torture Test. Yes they drove them like maniacs at times.

    http://www.roadandtrack.com/article.asp?section_id=7&article_id=4702

    :D
     
  8. KEmSAT-Survival

    KEmSAT-Survival

    Sep 23, 2008
    holy crap...talk about Lazarus rising from the grave... :D
     
  9. Ryan M

    Ryan M

    360
    Aug 18, 2001
    IIRC, I was exaggerating some, which no one seemed to get (I may've been drunk posting, as well). Mainly just, I don't see any need to baby an HI blade when using it, or to leave something unchopped just because it's in close proximity to a rock or something. I've yet to have incidental edge to rock/metal/concrete contact damage any of my HIs beyond my own ability to repair with the chakma and 5 minutes with sandpaper.

    In any case though, the real warranty is basically unchanged.
     
  10. 100eyes

    100eyes

    752
    Sep 12, 2008
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zWuGGsgfUnI

    Yep, that's real hallmark of scientific testing right there. :cool:
     
  11. Azraell

    Azraell

    214
    Dec 27, 2006
    Clearly, you don't know much about how testing is done. Sorry to burst your bubble, but scientific measurement when applied to things like cars and knives don't require perfect force measurements, nor hours in a lab number crunching.

    Noss' test serve a basic function in showing what a person can expect from a knife. It isn't published in a journal stating, "This is how a production knife will always function, no matter what." Since we're dealing with a line of products and aren't constructing an airtight theory, perfect measurement of every single swing, stab, and bend are unnecessary.
     
  12. MacHete

    MacHete Hair Cropper & Chipmunk Wrangler

    Apr 7, 2000
    Well, I happen to know quite a bit about industrial testing, having worked in the manufacturing and automotive industries for more than half of my life, and having been directly involved in Quality Assurance and Quality Improvement for most of that time.

    Yes, you can say "I'm gonna hit this thing with a hammer and see if it breaks" and call that a "test", but how valuable will that "data" be? How much more could you learn about a product's material or system durability if you hit it in a specific place with a hammer of a measured weight, shape and length with consistent force and counted the number of hits it took to do a specific amount of damage? -And perhaps then changed each of the above variables one at a time and compared the results? THEN you would have an idea of how much "punishment" your product could take, and also be able to identify design or production flaws so they might be corrected.

    I am sorry to burst your bubble, but the overwhelming majority of manufacturers who are interested in turning out a quality product approach their testing methods the way Esav describes them, not the way Noss does them.
     
  13. Cpl Punishment

    Cpl Punishment

    Jan 28, 2006
    I think the real statement that Noss' test of the AK is that all he was able to do was break the handle and bend the blade. If you do anything close to sane with these blades, you're not going to break them.

    I think that's the most data that can be gleaned from the test.
     
  14. killa_concept

    killa_concept

    May 19, 2009
    **Sorry in advance for the long post, but I felt I needed to get my opinion across**

    Definitely agreed. While it would be silly to claim Noss' test to be "scientific" by any meaning of the word, it is still a test and there is still information to be had from simply beating away at a knife.

    While it bothers me to see such abuse put to something handmade and with so much tradition behind it (as opposed to the other simply mass produced knives he's tested), the knife WAS made for purchase by the kami. Once the kami has received the money for that knife, I don't see why WE should have any qualms with what the buyer does with the knife (so long as there is no attempt to abuse the warranty - which could certainly affect the rest of us).

    Despite the unease I felt from seeing such high levels of abuse, I did feel that it served a purpose. Not only do I feel much more confident in my blade, but I know that viewers of the video out there will see how capable a blade it is and perhaps make a purchase!

    Instead of posting negative responses to the test on youtube, why don't we all post about how Himilayan Imports makes a Chiruwa model which probably would not have succumbed to the same fate? Himilayan Imports was founded to help out the kamis back in Nepal, so why scare away potential customers?
     
  15. Bladite

    Bladite ǝɹnsıǝן ɟo uɐɯǝןʇuǝb Moderator

    Feb 28, 2003
    The only thing I'll say about the testing, is that even after all that torture, he broke the handle off, he bent the knife, but he did NOT destroy the blade. looks like that knife passed a more stringent test than a Master's Blade to me ;)

    and all that damage would not cripple the knife being fixed up in the field, and continue to be useful. back home, i imagine a clever person could actually fix that khukri back to new. that's pretty damn good imho.

    and that's all i'm saying ;)


    Bladite
     

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